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As Cost Of US Health Care Skyrockets, So Does Pay Of Health Care CEOs

Vicki Reid, right, holds a likeness of John Martin, who was then CEO of the pharmaceutical company Gilead Sciences. Reid and others were protesting high drug prices in front of the conference on retroviruses and opportunistic infections — a meeting held at the World Congress Center in Atlanta in March 2013.

John Amis/AP Images for AIDS Healthcare Foundation


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John Amis/AP Images for AIDS Healthcare Foundation

Vicki Reid, right, holds a likeness of John Martin, who was then CEO of the pharmaceutical company Gilead Sciences. Reid and others were protesting high drug prices in front of the conference on retroviruses and opportunistic infections — a meeting held at the World Congress Center in Atlanta in March 2013.

John Amis/AP Images for AIDS Healthcare Foundation

In the seven years since the Affordable Care Act was passed, CEOs of U.S. health care companies have made a lot of money.

Their compensation far outstrips the wage growth of nearly all Americans, according to reporter Bob Herman, who published an analysis this week of “the sky-high pay of health care CEOs” for the online news site, Axios.

Based on corporate financial filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Herman did research on 113 heads of 70 of the largest U.S. health care companies in the last seven years. Cumulatively, he says, these CEOs have earned $9.8 billion since the ACA was first enacted. Only four of the 113 CEOs were women, he notes, and only two are right now in charge of major health care companies.

The top earner was John Martin, the former CEO of the pharmaceutical company Gilead Sciences, who took home nearly $900 million, Herman says. Gilead makes, among other things, medicines to treat HIV and AIDS, as well as two leading drugs to treat hepatitis C.

Several other executives topped $250 million.

Robert Siegel, host of NPR’s All Things Considered, spoke with Herman about his analysis. Excerpts of the interview follow, edited for length and clarity.

Interview Highlights

Who are these CEOs and why are they earning so much money — on average, $20 million per year, you say?

We looked at a wide array of different companies. They include pharmaceutical companies, health insurers, hospitals, pharmacies — it really spans the gamut. And we found that since the Affordable Care Act went into effect in 2010, their pay has really gone up. So the ACA hasn’t really hurt their earnings, per se. And a lot of the money that they’re earning is coming in the form of vested stocks.

Of course, an underlying issue behind all the talk about Obamacare is not just how we pay for health care and who gets insurance (and in what form) to pay for health care, but how much we pay for health care. What do these CEOs’ earnings say about health care costs in the United States?

For the longest time, health care inflation has really blown away the rate at which the rest of the economy is growing. And a big reason why is because health care executives are not paid to slow spending. Because so much of their pay comes in the form of stock, their incentive is to do whatever it takes to make that stock go up. So that means selling more drugs; raising prices above inflation; performing more procedures; getting more people into the hospital. And those are the exact opposite things that health policy experts believe would benefit the broader system: lower prices; eliminating unnecessary care and drugs; coordinating better care.

But from 2010 (when the Affordable Care Act was signed) through 2015, the Dow Jones went up from under 11,000 to almost 18,000. Wouldn’t executives in most sectors of the economy be making huge gains on stocks and stock options during the period that is also the lifetime of Obamacare?

The stock market really has been doing quite well since the Affordable Care Act has gone into effect, but the reason why this matters even more for health care is a sixth of our economy is devoted to health care. And that continues to grow more every year. So if the most influential executives of these companies are being paid to keep that trajectory up, that’s money that’s being taken away from education or infrastructure or other parts of the economy that may not be growing as quickly, and maybe that we’d want to grow more quickly.

Can a health care executive argue that the Affordable Care Act brought a lot of people into coverage who haven’t had it before? We’ve heard this anecdotally — that lots of people are getting treatment for things that they were skipping when they couldn’t afford it. So, more people are going to the doctor; they’re getting more prescriptions.

There is some effect there, but that doesn’t account for everything. The underlying incentives still really push these companies to do more — even if it’s unnecessary. There’s still this big issue of all these services that people are getting, are they necessary? And I think that’s one of the questions that still need to be answered.

Are there any proposals on the table now — either in Republican bills or in Democratic proposals — that would actually reduce health care costs significantly and reverse this trend?

In the health care debate right now, none of the proposals in Congress address this whatsoever. A lot of what’s being proposed merely tinkers with the financing of health care and who gets health insurance. Nothing is being addressed about drug prices, for example. Nothing’s being addressed about the actual costs of the system. The debate right now is still bickering over how to finance the system — not around how much the system itself costs, which I think is a big issue.

NPR editors Renita Jablonski and Gisele Grayson, and producer Ian Stewart contributed to this story.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/07/26/539518682/as-cost-of-u-s-health-care-skyrockets-so-does-pay-of-health-care-ceos

Senate Soundly Rejects Repeal-Only Health Plan

But even that narrow bill could have a significant impact on the nation’s health care system. Democrats on Wednesday night released a Congressional Budget Office analysis of the effects of repealing several provisions that could be part of a “skinny” repeal measure. The analysis found that the number of uninsured people would increase by 15 million next year compared with current law, and Democrats said they were told that premiums would be roughly 20 percent higher.

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But the point of the narrow repeal measure would not be to enact it. Instead, Republicans are simply trying to get some measure to bring to negotiations with the House.

“I think people would look at it not necessarily based on its content, but as a forcing mechanism to cause the two sides of the building to try to solve it together,” said Senator Bob Corker, Republican of Tennessee.

Photo

Senator Chuck Schumer of New York and Senator Claire McCaskill of Missouri on Wednesday after the Senate rejected a measure that would repeal major parts of the Affordable Care Act.

Credit
Stephen Crowley/The New York Times

Senator Chuck Schumer of New York, the Democratic leader, called that “a ruse to get to full repeal” and warned that hard-line Republicans in the House would apply pressure to reluctant moderate Republicans in the Senate.

A scaled-down bill would fall far short of what Senate leaders had aspired to pass. But if 50 senators could agree, with Vice President Mike Pence breaking any tie, such a bill would keep alive the effort to repeal the Affordable Care Act, under which about 20 million people have gained coverage.

“What we need to do in the Senate is figure out what the lowest common denominator is — what gets us to 50 votes so that we can move forward on a health care reform legislation,” Tom Price, the secretary of health and human services, said on CNBC.

That strategy would require conservative senators like Rand Paul of Kentucky, Ted Cruz of Texas and Mike Lee of Utah to vote for a measure that leaves the basic structure of the Affordable Care Act in place, hoping that House-Senate negotiations could produce a more ambitious repeal. Such senators have argued that far broader replacement legislation did too little to eradicate the health law.

Graphic

How Many People Across America Are at Risk of Losing Their Health Insurance?

A state-by-state look at who could lose insurance under the proposed Republican health care plans.


And cracks are already showing.

“The skinny plan is not a replacement of Obamacare,” Senator Lindsey Graham, Republican of South Carolina, said. “Would it be better than Obamacare? Yeah. But that’s not the goal. The goal is to replace Obamacare.”

In a letter on Wednesday, 10 governors — five Republicans and five Democrats — urged the Senate to reject a “skinny” repeal measure. The Blue Cross Blue Shield Association, a major insurance trade group, warned senators about the consequences of repealing the mandate that most people have health coverage without otherwise incentivizing people to get and maintain coverage.

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“A system that allows people to purchase coverage only when they need it drives up costs for everyone,” the association said.

With two legislative approaches having been rejected by Republicans — the comprehensive measure and then the repeal-only measure — Democrats were left wondering what exactly Republican leaders were cooking up, and how they could reasonably expect senators to vote on that legislation in just a day or two. Republican leaders have been plotting strategy and drafting legislation largely behind closed doors, with a final vote likely by Friday.

Video

The G.O.P.’s Health Care Hail Mary: ‘Skinny Repeal’

Margot Sanger-Katz, a New York Times correspondent, explains the implications of a new, more modest health care bill Republicans are working on.


By ROBIN STEIN, NATALIE RENEAU and ROBIN LINDSAY on Publish Date July 26, 2017.


Photo by Gabriella Demczuk for The New York Times.

Watch in Times Video »

Republicans are seeking to pass a repeal bill under special budget rules that limit debate to 20 hours and preclude a Democratic filibuster.

Senate Republican leaders, including the majority leader, Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, have emphasized that senators would be free to offer any amendments they see fit. But Senator Ben Cardin, Democrat of Maryland, highlighted a major challenge that he and other senators face: How can they prepare amendments to legislation without knowing what they are amending?

“What is the bill that we are considering?” he asked. “It’s not the bill that Senator McConnell brought forward because that bill was defeated. It’s not the ‘repeal and we’re starting from a blank slate’ because that was defeated.”

Just a week ago, Mr. McConnell seemed to have failed in putting together a health bill that could pass the Senate. But he managed to persuade enough of his reluctant members to agree on Tuesday to vote for a procedural motion to take up the repeal bill that passed the House in May, and on Wednesday, he vowed to press forward with the repeal effort.

How Each Senator Voted on Obamacare Repeal Proposals

A plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act and a partial repeal plan failed in the Senate.


The vote on the repeal-only measure showed the changing political dynamics that Republicans have grappled with this year on health care. With Mr. Obama in the White House, they could pummel his health law, with their words and with their votes, but his veto pen still loomed.

The Senate passed a similar repeal-only bill in 2015, and only one current Republican senator, Susan Collins of Maine, voted against it at the time. But that measure was vetoed by Mr. Obama, while senators are now trying to pass a bill that will actually become law.

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But the Congressional Budget Office said last week that the repeal-only legislation would increase the number of people who are uninsured by 17 million next year and by 32 million in 2026 compared with current law.

Senator Lamar Alexander of Tennessee, the chairman of the Senate health committee, was among the Republican senators who voted against the measure on Wednesday. He said he did not believe his constituents would like the idea of “canceling insurance” for millions of Americans and then “trusting Congress to find a replacement in two years.”

“Pilots like to know where they’re going to land when they take off,” Mr. Alexander said, “and we should too.”


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Article source: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/26/us/politics/senate-rejects-repealing-obamacare-without-replacement-trump.html

Senate Health Care Vote: Narrow Repeal Measure Takes Shape

Then there’s the question of what would come next. Republican leaders are assuring senators that the narrow repeal would be merely a vehicle to begin negotiations with House Republicans on a broader compromise to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. But some senators worry that they are being asked to vote for legislation they don’t like on a promise that it won’t become law — but they have no guarantee that the House won’t take it up and pass it.

Parliamentarian takes another scalp.

Senate Republicans also would have liked the “skinny repeal” to include a measure that would make it much easier for states to waive federal requirements that health insurance plans provide consumers with a minimum set of benefits like maternity care and prescription drugs.

Then the Senate parliamentarian stepped in. The parliamentarian, Elizabeth MacDonough, objected on Thursday to the waiver provision, saying it appeared to violate Senate rules being used to speed passage of the bill to repeal much of the Affordable Care Act.

Republicans want to make it easier for states to get waivers for two reasons: State officials can regulate insurance better than federal officials, they say, and the federal standards established by the Affordable Care Act have driven up insurance costs.

But Republicans are learning the limits of the fast-track rules they are using. The Senate is considering the repeal bill under special procedures that preclude a Democratic filibuster, but the procedures also limit what can be included in the bill.

“The function of reconciliation is to adjust federal spending and revenue, not to enact major changes in social policy,” said Senator Bernie Sanders, independent of Vermont. “The parliamentarian’s latest decision reveals once again that Republicans have abused the reconciliation process in an attempt to radically change one-sixth of the American economy by repealing the Affordable Care Act.”

The Senate bill would give states sweeping new authority to opt out of federal insurance standards established by the Affordable Care Act. It builds on a section of the law that allows states to obtain waivers for innovative health programs. But it would relax many of the requirements for such waivers that Democrats put into the law, signed by President Barack Obama in 2010.

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Insurers come off sidelines with warning.

The health insurance lobby, America’s Health Insurance Plans, came off the sidelines on Thursday to warn Senate leaders against repealing the Affordable Care Act’s mandate that most Americans have insurance without approving some mechanism to pressure people to maintain their coverage.

“We would oppose an approach that eliminates the individual coverage requirement, does not offer continuous coverage solutions, and does not include measures to immediately stabilize the individual market,” the group wrote.

AHIP played a major role in getting the Affordable Care Act passed in 2010 but has been reluctant to intervene in the fight over its repeal. On Wednesday, the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association, a narrower insurance lobby, weighed in with a similar warning.

Both groups were pulled into the fray by expectations that the Senate could end up voting in the early morning hours of Friday on a narrow bill that repeals a few important parts of the Affordable Care Act but leaves much of the law in place. Two of the pieces that would be repealed are the mandates that individuals have health insurance and that large employers cover their employees. The Senate had intended to repeal those mandates but create a new rule that anyone who allows coverage to lapse would have to wait six months before getting a new policy.

That lock out period was supposed to be enough to convince people not to simply wait until they were sick to buy insurance, a prospect that could send insurance markets into a tailspin, since only sick people would have insurance.

But it looks certain that any bill that can emerge from the Senate would not have the lock out provision, a deep concern to insurers who say that without it, insurance premiums would soar.

The American Medical Association piles on.

The American Medical Association, by far the largest physicians’ advocacy group, has stood firmly against each of the bills to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Now the A.M.A. has come out against the “skinny repeal.”

“There has been considerable speculation regarding a so-called ‘skinny package’ that would primarily eliminate penalties related to the individual and employer mandates and provide tax cuts to device manufactures and the health insurance industry. Eliminating the mandate to obtain coverage only exacerbates the affordability problem that critics say they want to address. Instead, it leads to adverse selection that would increase premiums and destabilize the individual market.

“We again urge the Senate to engage in a bipartisan process – through regular order – to address the shortcomings of the Affordable Care Act and achieve the goal of providing access to quality, affordable health care coverage to more Americans.”

Oh, and so does AARP.

Protesters make their voices known.

Across the Capitol on Thursday, supporters of the Affordable Care Act tried to reach out to senators, sometimes through mass protests, sometimes through their stories.

Graphic

How Many People Across America Are at Risk of Losing Their Health Insurance?

A state-by-state look at who could lose insurance under the proposed Republican health care plans.


“I had epilepsy as a kid. I would not have been able to be covered under what you’re proposing,” one man told Senator Richard Shelby, Republican of Alabama.

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The senator replied: “I think we need to have — not just for you but for any group that is underserved medically — we ought to protect them.”

Vigils broke out throughout the Capitol and around lawmakers’ offices.

Protesters in the Senate gallery chanting “kill the bill” disrupted proceedings on Tuesday just before the Senate voted, 51-50, to begin the health care debate. Democrats, including Senator Cory Booker of New Jersey, spoke to crowds on the steps of the building. Hundreds of protesters flooded the lawns outside the Capitol.

“The message was: we are not backing down,” Nora Franco, campaign organizer at Planned Parenthood, said in the Capitol. She added, “Now is not the time to throw in the towel. Now is the time to literally be harassing your senators.”

Seven years ago, similar scenes unfolded before the votes on the Affordable Care Act, but then, the passion came from the opponents. Those voices now are little in evidence.

Has Alaska’s delegation crossed Trump?

President Trump went after Senator Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, who was one of only two Republicans to vote against starting debate on health care this week, with a Twitter post on Wednesday.

But that might not be the end of it.

Ryan Zinke, the Interior secretary, called both Ms. Murkowski and Alaska’s other senator, Dan Sullivan, “letting them know the vote had put Alaska’s future with the administration in jeopardy,” The Alaska Dispatch News reported. Mr. Sullivan, also a Republican, voted in favor of beginning debate.

“I’m not going to go into the details, but I fear that the strong economic growth, pro-energy, pro-mining, pro-jobs and personnel from Alaska who are part of those policies are going to stop,” Mr. Sullivan said, according to the newspaper.

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But the leverage goes both ways.

Ms. Murkowski is the chairwoman of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, which has oversight of the Interior Department. She is also the chairwoman of the Senate Appropriations subcommittee with jurisdiction over the department.

She likely can do more to Mr. Zinke than he can do to her.

Tracked down by reporters on Capitol Hill, Mr. Sullivan called for the administration and Alaska’s small but powerful congressional delegation to “get back to cooperation.”

No word yet from Ms. Murkowski.

Where did the Senate leave off on Wednesday?

Wednesday’s big vote was on a measure to repeal major parts of the existing health law — but without swapping in something new.

Republicans have struggled to agree on the contents of a replacement for the law, so a “clean repeal” bill seemed like a good alternative to some of them.

But the measure was soundly rejected. Seven Republicans — including Senator Lamar Alexander of Tennessee, the chairman of the Senate health committee — joined Democrats in voting against it.

The repeal-only measure was expected to fail. But the episode demonstrated the problem facing Republican leaders: They don’t have enough votes to pass a broad replacement of the health law. They also don’t have the votes to simply repeal major parts of it.

Graphic

The Outcomes of the Many Republican Health Plans Are Not So Different

Comparing how the plans would affect key measures like the number of uninsured and the deficit.


What happens on Thursday?

Senate Republicans have been trying to push through a repeal by using special budget rules that limit debate to 20 hours. That time is expected to be exhausted on Thursday.

After it expires, the Senate will move into what is known as a “vote-a-rama” — a marathon series of votes on amendments.

Photo

Senator Chuck Schumer, the minority leader, leaving the Senate chamber after lawmakers on Wednesday rejected a proposal to repeal the health care law.

Credit
Stephen Crowley/The New York Times

Typically, Democrats would be expected to offer a barrage of amendments. But on Wednesday night, the minority leader, Chuck Schumer of New York, said Democrats would not offer any amendments until Mr. McConnell revealed the final bill he wants the Senate to consider.

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“We ought to see it soon, in broad daylight, not at the 11th hour,” Mr. Schumer said.

The vote-a-rama could begin late in the day on Thursday. If Democrats do offer a blizzard of amendments, it could stretch overnight. But it remains unclear when, exactly, Mr. McConnell plans to reveal his legislation.

Republicans seem increasingly likely to try to pass a slimmed-down bill that would repeal only a small number of the existing health law’s provisions. By passing a so-called “skinny” repeal bill, Senate Republicans would keep the repeal effort alive long enough to try to negotiate a broader compromise bill with the House of Representatives.


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Article source: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/27/us/politics/senate-health-care-vote.html

The 5 Habits That Actually Contribute To Longterm Health, According To Science

To look around at all the health articles, tips, tricks, listicles and books, you’d think health was an extraordinarily complicated matter—and must arise from some elusive combination of interval training, crossword puzzles, and avocados. But it’s not actually that complicated. In fact, what science knows to contribute to health is just a simple handful of things: We should exercise, eat well, sleep enough, avoid toxins, and take care of our mental health. All the other bits of advice generally fall within these five categories. Of course, there are some things that are outside of our control, like genetic predisposition and autoimmune disease. But of the part that we do have control over, the behaviors that define health aren’t all that complex.

Shutterstock

And it’s why public health experts are so frustrated with all the extraneous and needlessly complicated information floating around these days. “There are so many false narratives today (fake health news) that people genuinely are confused,” says David L. Katz, founding director of the Prevention Research Center at Yale University and the True Health Initiative. Some people may not know what to do, and others, even if they know what to do, may not have the means to do it. “There are people living with such constant daily challenges,” adds Katz, “that they never even think about health until it becomes the most urgent crisis du jour.”

Here’s a rundown of the five main habits that contribute to health, and why they actually do this. How to help people implement them is again the harder question.

 

Move your body

Most people are generally aware that exercise is good for them, but may not be clear on exactly why this is. It’s not just a method of staying thin or getting fitwhere exercise is really powerful is in its effects on the risk of chronic disease. Exercise has been shown to contribute to heart health in a number of ways, from helping reduce blood pressure to affecting the vasculature in our bodies to helping maintaining our cholesterol balance (the “good”-to-”bad” ratio), and increasing insulin sensitivity. Regular exercise also benefits the immune system, reducing inflammatory markers like CRP, IL-6 and TNF, which are known to be associated with chronic disease. Exercise is also well known to reduce cancer risk, for multiple types of cancer. And it’s excellent for the brain: It helps treat mental health disorders like depression, boosts the production new neurons in the hippocampus, and regulates the endocrine system, including stress response and the cascade of hormones that underlie it. Importantly, exercise is also linked to a reduced risk of brain diseases like Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia.

On the flip side, being sedentary is linked to a host of ill effects, from Alzheimer’s disease to heart disease to cancer to premature death. Both observational studies—in people who get regular exercise and in people who don’t—and lab studies that illuminate the cellular and molecular mechanisms show that exercise is one of the central things we can do for our health.

Eat a plant-based diet

This one has been illustrated again and again in various ways. Large-scale epidemiological studies have shown that people who eat a largely plant-based diet are less prone to disease and live longer than people who eat other types—you don’t have to be vegetarian or vegan, but a diet that’s based largely on plants does seem necessary. A study a couple of years ago even showed that switching diets (from a typical meaty American diet to a plant-based rural South African diet and vice-versa) altered the microbiome and the inflammatory markers involved in colon cancer risk in a relatively short amount of time. Other research has shown that a plant-based diet reduces the risk of heart disease, dementia, cancer, metabolic disease, overweight and obesity, and diabetes.

The star of diets in recent years has been the Mediterranean diet, or a version of it, like the MIND diet. These diets include copious amounts of vegetables and fresh fruits (although the MIND diet excludes fruits, because of their relatively high sugar content), whole grains, nuts, legumes, fish, and healthy fats like olive oil. It limits dairy, meat, processed foods, alcohol (though a little red wine is ok) and, importantly, sugar. The research in the last decade has highlighted the fact that sugar actually presents a much larger health risk than fats; in fact, there’s no formal upper limit on fats anymore, assuming that they’re healthy ones. Cutting out processed foods including sugar, and eating as many foods in their natural form, or close to it, as we can, is probably one of single best changes we can make for long-term health.

 

Sleep

The purpose of this mysterious nightly behavior eluded researchers for many years, but it’s starting to become clearer. Sleep serves a number of purposes, particularly for the brain, which can’t survive without it. While we’re sleeping, the brain actively prunes connections that we don’t need anymore, and perhaps even more crucial than this, it clears out the “gunk” that contributes to Alzheimer’s disease—by the same token, sleep deprivation is linked to a heightened risk of Alzheimer’s. Sleep loss, and the stress and hormone dysregulation that comes of it, is linked to a host of other problems, including weight gain, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, inflammation, depression, stroke and heart disease.

Aiming for between seven and nine hours per night for adults is generally a good rule of thumb. (If you’re getting or need much less or much more than this, it might be a sign of a health problem, so this should be checked out.)

 

Make your mental health a real priority 

This is one of the most fascinating ones, as it underlines how big an influence our mental health has on our physical health. It actually contains a couple of points, which are separate but related. The first part is taking care of your own internal mental health, and treating mental health disorders when they arise. Depression, anxiety, addiction and chronic stress all raise the risk of other diseases and the risk of early mortality.

Also under the umbrella of mental health is staying socially connected. An almost 80-year long Harvard study has found that a key indicator of a person’s health and longevity was whether he or she had rich social connections. This may work for a couple of reasons: We’re social creatures by nature, and being around other people is a huge stress relief and mood booster. Additionally, having a social network, including a partner, may also make it more likely that you’ll take better care of yourself along the way, and seek medical care when problems arise. 

There are other, more specific elements that fall under this category—for instance, having a life purpose outside yourself is also linked to a significantly longer life and to improved inflammatory gene expression. And staying cognitively active by engaging in hobbies, crossword puzzles, and brain games may help, but the research is a little more mixed there.

                                                                                                                                                                   

Avoid taking in harmful chemicals, and critters, as much as possible

This one includes the big carcinogen, which still kills way too many people about the globe—tobacco. It also covers drinking, which, if you’re going to do it, should probably fall into the “light” category. The tobacco literature speaks for itself, but the research on alcohol is only just becoming clearer. Some researchers believe that moderate drinking is ok and even beneficial for reducing disease risk, but recent studies have suggested that even light drinking confers some level of cancer risk. Therefore, very light drinking is probably the best advice, and not to start drinking for the health benefits if you don’t currently.

This category also includes exposure to other toxins, carcinogens and endocrine disruptors, from smog to beauty products to plastics. There are lots of “bad chemicals” out there and it’s impossible to avoid everything; but cutting down where we can is probably smart. The use of OTC meds like acetaminophen and ibuprofen should probably be sparing, since they’ve also been shown to have some long term risks.

Finally, also in this category is trying to reduce our exposure to bacteria and viruses—within reason. This includes everything from practicing safe sex to washing your hands regularly to getting vaccinated. The antibacterial craze has largely backfired, so you don’t have to go crazy with antibacterial soap and wipes. Let your kids play in the dirt and with the pets. A little exposure to germs (again, within reason) can actually be a good thing.

* * *  

Again, a healthy lifestyle is not really all that complicated. It boils down to just a handful of behaviors. But this is also what makes it so difficult—that these things are, in the end, all behaviors, which means it’s up to us to be aware of them and to see them through.

And, of course, the relevant organizations need to agree on what the healthy behaviors actually are, and not get swayed by big food, lobbyists, and advertising. The trick then is how to make these basic habits common knowledge. Says Katz, “if we actually could rally our culture to clarity about where ‘there’ is, we might devote more resources to getting there from here. And we might be less complacent about such hypocrisies as lamenting the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in children, while introducing the attached new products as part of every kid’s ‘complete breakfast.’ There should be collective outrage—but there isn’t.”

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Article source: https://www.forbes.com/sites/alicegwalton/2017/07/27/the-5-habits-that-really-define-longterm-health-according-to-science/

AF extends Health Professions Loan Repayment Program

/ Published July 27, 2017

JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO-RANDOLPH, Texas (AFNS) —
Application packages for the Air Force’s Health Professions Loan Repayment Program will now be accepted until Sept. 1, 2017. Active-duty Biomedical Sciences Corps and Nurse Corps officers are eligible to apply. 
  
HPLRP provides an incentive for current active-duty medical personnel to extend their active duty commitment through the repayment of professional educational loans, provided they are in the selected career fields and otherwise eligible.
 
“We want our people to be able to balance their commitment to serve their country and support their families,” said Maj. Connie Converse, a Biomedical Sciences Corps utilization officer at the Air Force Personnel Center. “This initiative helps alleviate some of the financial burden of student loans, instilling greater confidence about their futures and allowing greater flexibility for families.”
 
The maximum loan repayment is $40,000 per year for up to two years, minus about 28 percent in federal income taxes, which are taken out prior to lender repayment. 

“The loan repayment counts as income,” Converse said. “We encourage officers with questions about the tax effects to consult with their tax expert prior to applying for the program.” 

Repayment may consist of loan amounts for principal, interest and reasonable educational and living expenses, and are sent directly to the lending institution on behalf of the HPLRP participant. 

Officers may use HPLRP to repay any qualified loans obtained for their qualifying degree that allows them to hold their Air Force Specialty Code. 

“The Air Force Officer Classification Directory on myPers is the source document that provides the type of qualifying degree the member requires in order to obtain their commission,” Converse said. “The expense to obtain that degree is what the Air Force considers eligible debt for this program.” 

The service commitment for HPLRP is a minimum of two years, Converse said. 

Find additional information about the application requirements and process on myPers. Select “Active Duty Officer” from the dropdown menu and search “HPLRP.”
 
For more information about Air Force personnel programs, go to myPers. Individuals who do not have a myPers account can request one by following these instructions.

AFPC

Biomedical

health professionals

JB San Antonio-Randolph

loan repayment

MDG

MyPers

science

taking care of people

Article source: http://www.af.mil/News/Article-Display/Article/1260068/af-extends-health-professions-loan-repayment-program/

To Your Good Health: Yogurt is an effective preventative for reader’s recurrent UTIs

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Article source: http://www.roanoke.com/life/columns_and_blogs/columns/to_your_good_health/to-your-good-health-yogurt-is-an-effective-preventative-for/article_08b3db25-196d-5b7b-a956-3fc2211b4de8.html

From political power to the power of good health

The old Brookhaven Town Hall building, once the center of impactful political decisions, is now officially an influential destination for health and wellness.

Northwell Health Physician Partners, a multispecialty doctors’ office at 205 South Ocean Avenue, opened for business July 10 in the stately brick structure completed in 1926.

The 14,000-square-foot facility offers primary specialty care services covering cardiology, gastroenterology, pulmonary, nephrology, rheumatology and ophthalmology within its 16 rooms and can provide services to more than 130 patients per day, with 11 physicians and 33 support staff. It’s open Monday to Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

For Patchogue historians, features like the Brookhaven Town Hall lettering etched into its façade, the old phone booth and the gorgeous, spiral marble staircase remains. So does the copper beech tree.

According to Northwell Health spokesperson Jason Molinet, the Patchogue office underwent a $4.7 million multiyear renovation; Northwell worked with the Town of Brookhaven to preserve the historic value of the building. The lease is for 10.5 years.

Brookhaven Supervisor Ed Romaine commented that the building sat vacant for 17 years.

“As supervisor, it was my desire to sell it,” he said. “It was a nonperforming asset and we made a major effort. We didn’t realize a lot of profit [as it sold for $850,000] because of the asbestos remediation, but now it will be an asset to Patchogue Village and the town.” The stairway mural, a Native American scene, was removed and transferred to Town Hall. “We paid $20,000 to have it removed,” Romaine said. “But it talks to the history of the town.”

Dr. Thomas McGinn, senior vice president and executive director of medicine for Northwell Health, commented on their entry into the area. “This is like a flagship for us sitting in Patchogue,” he said. “We’ve had some scattered practice sites, but the concept is that this would be a place people would want to come to, and really get the big bulk of primary specialties conveniently in one building with the electronic data shared by our doctors. We’re able to do stress testing, nuclear imaging, anti-coagulating monitoring, and a lot of new endoscopic procedures.”

McGinn said the Patchogue model was one of the first Northwell Health is attempting to establish in communities.

Six exam rooms, physicians’ offices, a nuclear testing suite, an echocardiography and vascular laboratory and stress echocardiography-testing suite take up the first floor. The second floor, with 10 exam rooms, has physicians’ offices and suites for specialized ophthalmology testing and pulmonary-function testing.

Donna Garambone, administrative director of medical services at Northwell Health Physician Partners, led the tour on the second floor, pointing out some cutting-edge additions. “The pulmonary-function testing is state of the art,” she said. “With it we use nitrogen. It’s a lot less expensive and cleaner than using helium and it’s smaller equipment.”

Several chairs near a window with computers provided a compact workstation for medical assistants and RNs. “I love these chairs,” she said. “They’re ergonomically correct and you can stand or sit.”

“There are little things we did, like an all-in-one keyboard that lights up, saves space and enables the doctor to record or check information and sit and face the patient as opposed to having their backs to them,” Garambone added.

Light blue walls and framed pictures of Long Island water and beach scenes hang in the hallways. Garambone said the stairway’s original chandelier was being installed later in the day and the staircases’ marble was being refinished.

According to Terry Lynman, chief public relations officer and senior vice president at Northwell Health, Suffolk County has been a major target, but historically they’d been in western Suffolk. “We’ve been expanding east with Huntington and Southside hospitals and Peconic Bay Medical Center,” he said. “We also have Northwell Go-Health Urgent Care locations.”

Patchogue Mayor Paul Pontieri, who was an eyewitness to the building’s metamorphosis, conducted a walk-through a couple of weeks ago.

“They did a beautiful job,” he said. “It flows well and is a great re-use of the facility and it goes back onto the tax roles. We’re very fortunate in the village to have Northwell Health with their services and Brookhaven Memorial Hospital Medical Center nearby. There are larger areas in the county that do not have the coverage we have.”

Northwell Health, formerly North Shore-LIJ, has 18 hospitals in their network that includes Long Island, Manhattan, Staten Island and Westchester County.

Some history on Old Town Hall

The walls of the spiral staircase are awash in fresh paint, with light from new windows pouring in on a tour this week. But it was a mess in July 2012.

The Native American mural was removed to Town Hall and now graces the second-floor balcony area, thanks to efforts by the current administration. They paid for asbestos remediation and interior gutting.

In a former interview, Brookhaven Town historian Barbara Russell stated that the old Brookhaven Town Hall property was purchased on March 10, 1925; it was built a year later with a dedication in the town justice hall on June 5, 1926. 

Two wings, a WPA project, were completed in 1939, said Patchogue Mayor Paul Pontieri. 

Stan Allan, patriarch of The Gateway family, was town clerk and the last staffer to leave the building on April 26, 2004. He took his chair with him.

“There are beautiful vaults in the basement from when the town clerk’s office was there,” said senior building inspector Peter Sarich. “They’re very decorative and from another time.”

Pontieri commented that initially, the property had a covenant that when the town no longer used the building as a government facility, it would revert back to the village. 

But it was a white elephant, much too big for village uses. There was vigilance to ensure it wasn’t vandalized, but not much else. There were efforts by former town councilman Tim Mazzei to establish a senior citizen center there, but that would have cost in excess of $5 million, and former congressman Tim Bishop had expressed interest to move his office there before settling on Oak Street. 

Renovation work was completed methodically and with care. Sarich confirmed that John Caffrey, a Hauppauge-based entrepreneur whose expertise is financial planning and real estate, is the owner with investors of Old Town Hall via 201-205 South Ocean Realty LLC.

The space was leased to Northwell Health last year.

Article source: https://www.longislandadvance.net/4649/From-political-power-to-the-power-of-good-health

UPDATE: Four plane crash victims declared in good health


KOIN 6 NEWS - Four people were injured in this Sunday plane crash in Sandy.

KOIN 6 NEWS - Four people were injured in this Sunday plane crash in Sandy.Four St. Helens residents sustained non-life threatening injuries after the airplane they were in crash-landed at the Sandy Kiwanis 60th Annual Fly-In Cruise-In on Sunday, July 23. The small aircraft clipped its left wing then fell nose-first into the ground upon arrival at McKinnon Airpark, 12960 S.E. Ten Eyck Road.

Sandy Fire crews standing by at the fundraising event responded immediately. Two women on board were transported and examined for further injuries at a local trauma center. The pilot’s and another passenger’s injuries did not require hospitalization.

Officials with the Federal Aviation Administration, which is working with the National Transportation Safety Board to investigate the incident, declined to release the victims’ names. Sandy Fire Chief Phil Schneider said he spoke with the pilot on Monday, July 24, and the two women were given a clean bill of health and discharged earlier that day.

“Any time there’s a traumatic event like that they enter you into the trauma center,” Schneider said. “It is fortunate everyone is doing well.”

An incident such as this is unprecedented at the annual fundraiser. Sandy Kiwanis Vice President Kole Pearson said although it was unfortunate, “It could have been worse, and we’re very fortunate it was what is was.”

The crash took place in a sparsely populated, open area of the venue and did not directly affect festival attendees or infrastructure.

“I don’t believe it affected the rest of the event,” Pearson said, though the event coordinators updated participants when the victims were declared in good health. “We’re grateful everyone in the plane and on the ground is OK.”

Article source: http://pamplinmedia.com/sp/68-news/367364-248953-update-four-plane-crash-victims-declared-in-good-health

St. Tammany Healthy Living for July 26, 2017

STPH NEUROSCIENCE: St. Tammany Parish Hospital has opened a neuroscience unit, including a four-bed neuro critical care unit and a 10-bed neuro medical surgical care unit. In partnership with Ochsner Health System, STPH expanded neurosciences in 2016 with the addition of Ochsner neurologists and neurosurgeons. STPH opened a larger operating suite in January to accommodate the neurosurgeries being performed.

MALL WALKERS: North Shore Square Mall, 150 Northshore Blvd., Slidell, will open for walkers at 7 a.m. Wednesday, July 26, through a partnership with Slidell Memorial Hospital to encourage people to walk with the advantages of the mall’s security, air conditioning and water fountains. For information, call (985) 280-8529.

ME AND MY TOT TIME: Parents and grandparents will discuss child development issues and parenting tips while their children enjoy playtime with others Wednesday, July 26, in the Community Outreach Center, second floor, Slidell Memorial Hospital Wellness Pavilion, 501 Robert Blvd. The 9:30 a.m. session is for toddlers up to 30 months, and the 11 a.m. session is for ages 31 months to preschool. For information, call (985) 280-8529.

NEWBORN CARE: Feeding, diapering, swaddling and bathing are among the topics to be covered during a newborn care class from 7  p.m. to 9  p.m. Thursday, July 27, in the Magnolia Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. To make a reservation, call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

BABY AND ME: Parents of babies who are not yet walking will share issues and insights about parenting at 10  a.m. Thursday, July 27, in the Community Outreach Center on the second floor of the Slidell Memorial Hospital Wellness Pavilion, 501 Robert Blvd. For information, call (985) 280-8529.

URINARY INCONTINENCE: Dr. Laura Desrosiers, an obstetrician-gynecologist, will discuss risk factors and treatment options for urinary incontinence at 11 a.m. Friday, July 28, in the first-floor conference room of the Slidell Memorial Hospital Founders Building, 1150 Robert Blvd. The free presentation is part of Slidell Memorial’s Lunch Learn series. To register, call (985) 280-2657.

BREAST-FEEDING CLINIC: Lactation consultants will offer support and encouragement from 9:30  a.m. to noon Saturday, July 29, in the Florida Avenue conference room at Slidell Memorial Hospital, 1025 Florida Ave., Slidell. The program is free. To register, call (985) 280-8585 or visit slidellmemorial.org

YOGA FOR CANCER PATIENTS: 5:30 p.m. Monday, July 31, Community Outreach Center, second floor, Slidell Memorial Hospital Wellness Pavilion, 501 Robert Blvd. Classes are free, but registration and medical release are required. (985) 707-4961.

GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP: Certified grief counselor Sue deRada will lead the Open Arms grief support group at 11 a.m. Wednesday, Aug. 2, at Piccadilly Cafeteria, 104 U.S. 190 Business, Slidell. The cost is $10. The next session will be Aug. 16. To register, call (985) 630-6363.

MEDICARE 101: A free presentation on the the basics of Medicare Part A, B, C and D coverage will be held from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 3, at the Slidell Library, 555 Robert Blvd. The program will be repeated from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 24, at the Causeway Library, 3457 U.S. 190, Mandeville. To register, visit www.bit.ly/stplregister or call the hosting library: Slidell, (985) 646-6470, or Causeway, (985) 626-9779.

CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP: 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m., first and third Fridays of the month, Women’s Center for Healing and Transformation, 71667 Leveson St., Abita Springs. The next meeting will be Aug. 4. (985) 892-8111.

STROKE SUPPORT GROUP: A support group for stroke survivors and their caregivers will meet from 5:30  p.m. to 6:30  p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 9, in the Magnolia Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. Topics include nutrition, social services, rehabilitation therapy and medical management. To register, call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

BASIC LIFE SUPPORT FOR HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS: Caregivers may benefit from a basic life support course to be held from 8:15  a.m. to 12:30  p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 9, in the Pelican Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. The course is designed to teach CPR for victims of all ages and use of an automated external defibrillator. Cost is $35, plus a $20 deposit for the book. Call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

LAMAZE CHILDBIRTH CLASS: Relaxation and breathing techniques for natural childbirth, signs and symptoms of labor, and postpartum care will be discussed during a Lamaze childbirth class to be held from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 17, in the Pelican Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. To reserve a spot, call (985) 867-3900 or visit www.lakeviewregional.com.

NORTHSHORE BIRTH OPTIONS: Jen Kamel, founder of VBAC Facts, will present a workshop on vaginal birth after cesareans from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 26, at Staybridge Suites, 140 Holiday Blvd., Covington. The workshop is being organized by Northshore Birth Options. The cost is $125. Participants will receive 6.6 nursing continuing education hours. For information, email options@northshorebirth.org. For tickets, visit eventbrite.com.

TOTAL JOINT CLASS: A physical therapist, surgical nurse, case manager and orthopedic nurse will discuss preoperative and postoperative care for patients undergoing total joint replacement surgery at 1  p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 30, in the Magnolia Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. To reserve a spot, call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

MEDICARE AND SOCIAL SECURITY: Representatives of the Simon Simon Group will give a presentation on Medicare and Social Security from 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 31, at the Community Center at Christwood, 100 Christwood Blvd., Covington. The presentation is part of the center’s Wisdom Wine lecture series. The cost is $5. To reserve your spot, call (985) 292-1234.

RELAY FOR LIFE: The American Cancer Society will present the Relay for Life of St. Tammany West from 11:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 9, at Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. To participate, visit Relayforlife.org/weststtammanyla or call Heidi McGrath at (985) 966-4731.

PREPARING FOR CHILDBIRTH: When to come to the hospital, pain management and complications in pregnancy are among the topics that will be discussed during a childbirth preparation program from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Monday, Sept. 11, in the Magnolia Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. To register, call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

STROKE SUPPORT GROUP: A support group for stroke survivors and their caregivers will meet from 5:30  p.m. to 6:30  p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 13, in the Magnolia Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. Discussion topics include nutrition, social services, rehabilitation therapy and medical management. To register, call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

BREAST-FEEDING CLASS: The benefits and process of breast-feeding, including positioning and latching, will be addressed during a class from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, Sept. 16, in the Magnolia Room at Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. To register, call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

TOTAL JOINT CLASS: A physical therapist, surgical nurse, case manager and orthopedic nurse will discuss preoperative and postoperative care for patients undergoing total joint replacement surgery at 1  p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 19, in the Magnolia Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. To reserve a spot, call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

GIRL TALK: Preteen and teen girls will learn about the physical, social and emotional changes of puberty during the Girl Talk session from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 19, in the first-floor conference room of the Slidell Memorial Hospital Founders Building, 1150 Robert Blvd., Slidell. Presenters will include pediatrician Alice LeBreton and dermatologist Deborah Hilton. Teens must be accompanied by an adult. The fee is $10 per family. To register, call (985) 280-2657 or visit slidellmemorial.org.

BASIC LIFE SUPPORT FOR HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS: Caregivers may benefit from a basic life support course to be held from 8:15  a.m. to 12:30  p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 20, in the Pelican Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. The course is designed to teach CPR for victims of all ages and use of an automated external defibrillator. The cost is $35 for the class, plus a $20 deposit for the book. To reserve a spot, call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

LAKEVIEW REGIONAL AUXILIARY: The Lakeview Regional Medical Center Volunteer Auxiliary will hold a Savvy Linens fundraiser from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday, Sept. 20-21, in the main entrance lobby of the hospital, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. Proceeds will benefit the auxiliary’s charities in St. Tammany Parish.

NEWBORN CARE: Feeding, diapering, swaddling and bathing are among the topics to be covered during a newborn care class from 7  p.m. to 9  p.m. Thursday, Sept. 21, in the Magnolia Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. To make a reservation, call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

TOTAL JOINT CLASS: A physical therapist, surgical nurse, case manager and orthopedic nurse will discuss preoperative and postoperative care for patients undergoing total joint replacement surgery at 1  p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 3, in the Pelican Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. To reserve a spot, call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

LAKEVIEW REGIONAL AUXILIARY: The Lakeview Regional Medical Center Volunteer Auxiliary will hold a jewelry sale Wednesday through Friday, Oct. 4-6, in the main entrance lobby of the hospital, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. Sale hours will be from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oct. 4, from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Oct. 5, and from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Oct. 6. Proceeds will benefit the auxiliary’s charities in St. Tammany Parish.

SIBLING CLASS IN COVINGTON: A class for children ages 3-8 who are about to be big brothers and sisters will be held from 10  a.m. to noon Saturday, Oct. 7, in the Magnolia Room at Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. The children will watch a video about what it will be like to have a new baby at home and will practice with dolls or stuffed animals they have brought. To register, call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

STROKE SUPPORT GROUP: A support group for stroke survivors and their caregivers will meet from 5:30  p.m. to 6:30  p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 11, in the Magnolia Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. Discussion topics include nutrition, social services, rehabilitation therapy and medical management. To register, call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

BASIC LIFE SUPPORT FOR HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS: Caregivers may benefit from a basic life support course to be held from 8:15  a.m. to 12:30  p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 11, in the Pelican Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. The course is designed to teach CPR for victims of all ages and use of an automated external defibrillator. The cost is $35 for the class, plus a $20 deposit for the book. To reserve a spot, call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

LAMAZE CHILDBIRTH CLASS: Relaxation and breathing techniques for natural childbirth, signs and symptoms of labor, and postpartum care will be discussed during a Lamaze childbirth class to be held from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 12, in the Magnolia Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. Bring a pillow and blanket. To reserve a spot, call (985) 867-3900 or visit www.lakeviewregional.com.

TOTAL JOINT CLASS: A physical therapist, surgical nurse, case manager and orthopedic nurse will discuss preoperative and postoperative care for patients undergoing total joint replacement surgery at 1  p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 17, in the Pelican Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. To reserve a spot, call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

NUTRITION: Rebecca Lee will discuss approaches to achieving a healthy weight from 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 26, at the Community Center at Christwood, 100 Christwood Blvd., Covington. The presentation is part of the center’s Wisdom Wine lecture series. The cost is $5. To reserve your spot, call (985) 292.1234.

BOO FEST: The ACCESS nonprofit for children with disabilities will be the beneficiaries of Boo Fest 2017, which will be from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 28, at Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. The gates will open at 9 a.m. for special-needs families. Admission is $2. There will be more than 70 haunted houses, costume contests, pumpkin decorating, face painting and all-abilities games. ACCESS stands for Adapting and Changing Children’s Environments with Successful Solutions. Also, the Northshore Area Board of Realtors will hold its Chili Challenge during Boo Fest. For information, visit accesslouisiana.org/boofest-2017.

FOOT CARE: Dr. Ryan Green will give a presentation, ”The Right Fit for Your Feet,” from 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 14, at the Community Center at Christwood, 100 Christwood Blvd., Covington. The presentation is part of the center’s Wisdom Wine lecture series. The cost is $5. To reserve your spot, call (985) 292.1234.

BABY AND ME TOBACCO-FREE: Slidell Memorial Hospital is holding smoking-cessation programs on Mondays and Wednesdays by appointment. For information or to request an application, call Ashlee Menke at (504) 733-5539. 

GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS: Gamblers Anonymous meets several times a week throughout the New Orleans area. Gamblers Anonymous is a fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength and hope with one another that they may solve their common problem and help others to recover from a gambling problem. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop gambling. For information, call (855) 222-5542 or visit gamblersanonymous.org.

Article source: http://www.theadvocate.com/new_orleans/news/communities/st_tammany/article_5dc1db22-6995-11e7-bca5-dbe90dd355f1.html

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Article source: http://www.independenttribune.com/news/network-of-care-event-promotes-healthy-living/article_74721751-3698-565b-949c-d8210abdba19.html