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HIIT: is the fitness scene’s biggest fad doing more harm than good?

What will make a difference to your fitness is incorporating movement throughout the day. It’s not difficult: set an hourly reminder to get up from your desk and walk around the office for five minutes; choose (or maybe accept!) to stand on your commute; take the stairs and avoid the lift or escalator. Try taking your trainers to work and get off 1 or 2 stops early on your way back, to walk or run the rest of the way home.

My belief is that everyone should try to train like athletes do. I don’t mean the same training frequency and intensity as athletes, I mean the mentality and the approach. Having trained as a competitive sprinter for four years, I learned to take every aspect of my life into account: sleep, rest days, nutrition and weaknesses. I learnt to listen to my body. Some days I would wake up feeling tired and fatigued, so on those days I wouldn’t train hard. I would do something less intense and focus on recovery.

Remember: burning calories isn’t the be all and end all of fitness and good health. Yes, HIIT may burn more calories than any other form of exercise, but it’s no use if it leads to injury or illness. Overtraining is a real danger: it can ruin your immune system, cause insomnia, affect your appetite and release cortisol, which in turn can make you more likely to put on fat.

Article source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health-fitness/body/hiit-fitness-scenes-biggest-fad-harm-good/

The Chinese lawyer who vanished two years ago and the only man who’s seen him since

Human rights lawyer Wang Quanzhang – who had not been seen or heard from since he was detained in a crackdown two years ago – is in good health in a Tianjin facility, according to a lawyer who claims to have visited him.

While Wang’s wife, Li Wenzu, was relieved to know where he was, she said she was angry that he had been detained without trial since July 10, 2015.

Tianjin prosecutors told Li early this year that Wang had been indicted on charges of “inciting subversion of state power”, but there had been no information about any trial since then.

Isolated, tortured and mentally scarred … the plight of China’s persecuted human rights lawyers

Wang’s relatives as well as lawyers and international human rights groups have repeatedly appealed to the Chinese authorities for his release and for information on his well-being.

He had also been denied access to lawyers. However, Zhejiang-based lawyer Chen Youxi on Wednesday announced on social media that he had met Wang in a Tianjin detention facility and that he was in good health.

“I met him in person and he is doing well physically and mentally,” Chen later told the South China Morning Post.

But Li remains worried about her husband, saying that lawyers appointed by the family had not been allowed to see Wang.

“This is some sort of confirmation [that he is still alive], but I am very worried about his health and whether he’s been tortured,” Li said.

In a statement issued late on Tuesday, Li said she had been approached by two lawyers in the past 10 days who claimed to have met Wang.

“My lawyers have tried their best to gain access to Wang in over 40 attempts over the past two years but they’ve been barred by the authorities,” Li said. “I’m very angry and do not wish to be approached by any more government-appointed lawyers.”

Human rights lawyer swept up in ‘709 crackdown’ to face court in Tianjin for subversion

Chen said on social media that he was informed by the Tianjin judicial authorities on July 12 that Wang had requested Chen as his lawyer. He said he arrived the next day and met Wang, but the detained rights lawyer changed his mind and decided to defend himself instead.

The post included an appointment letter purportedly signed by Wang and a photo of Chen posing outside the Tianjin No 2 Detention Centre.

Wang has represented a number of defendants in rights cases including Jiangsu-based Falun Gong practitioner Zhu Yanian in 2013.

Prominent Chinese rights lawyer gets suspended jail term in closed trial

He has said he was assaulted by police in Heilongjiang province in 2014 during a rally for other lawyers who had been beaten and persecuted at a detention centre in the city of Jiamusi.

Some 300 lawyers, legal assistants and dissidents were detained in a crackdown on legal activists that began on July 9, 2015. Most of them were released but nine were convicted and at least five, including Wang, are still in custody without trial, according to the China Human Rights Lawyers Concern Group.

Article source: http://www.scmp.com/news/china/policies-politics/article/2104246/missing-human-rights-lawyer-good-health-tianjin

The FDA did a good thing for digital health today — even skeptics agree

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Dr. Scott Gottlieb, FDA Commissioner.

On Thursday, FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb announced a pilot program to look into a “pre-certification” for medical software start-ups.

And even the FDA’s harshest critics are excited about it.

“I guess I’ve grown cynical in my old age, as I’ve watched administrations come and go,” said Bradley Merrill Thompson, an FDA expert and lawyer with the firm Epstein, Becker Green, in an email to CNBC. “[But] I think the idea of a pilot program is brilliant.”

The agency is hoping to fast-track the approval process for medical software start-ups and products that are less risky for patients than a traditional medical devices. The idea is that these companies could submit less information than is currently required — or none at all.

The FDA will let up to 9 companies sign up for this pilot. After that, fast-track approval could become the norm.

Thompson praised Gottlieb’s agenda a month ago when the FDA announced plans for a digital health innovation plan. At that time, he was hoping that the agency would move ahead with a pilot program or sorts, so it could gather feedback from the industry.

“This stuff is really hard to figure out in the abstract,” he said. “It’s really only by working with companies and tinkering and experimenting that we can truly identify the best model.”

The agency also shared an action plan with timelines on how it intends to regulate digital health companies.

“Historically, healthcare has been slow to implement disruptive technology tools that have transformed other areas of commerce and daily life,” acknowledged Gottlieb, a doctor and former venture capitalist, in a blog post.

“One factor that’s been cited, among many, is the regulation that accompanies medical products,” he wrote. “But momentum toward a digital future in healthcare is advancing.”



FDA's Scott Gottlieb: Opioid addiction is FDA's biggest crisis now


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To Your Good Health: Yogurt is an effective preventative for reader’s recurrent UTIs

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Article source: http://www.roanoke.com/life/columns_and_blogs/columns/to_your_good_health/to-your-good-health-yogurt-is-an-effective-preventative-for/article_08b3db25-196d-5b7b-a956-3fc2211b4de8.html

From political power to the power of good health

The old Brookhaven Town Hall building, once the center of impactful political decisions, is now officially an influential destination for health and wellness.

Northwell Health Physician Partners, a multispecialty doctors’ office at 205 South Ocean Avenue, opened for business July 10 in the stately brick structure completed in 1926.

The 14,000-square-foot facility offers primary specialty care services covering cardiology, gastroenterology, pulmonary, nephrology, rheumatology and ophthalmology within its 16 rooms and can provide services to more than 130 patients per day, with 11 physicians and 33 support staff. It’s open Monday to Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

For Patchogue historians, features like the Brookhaven Town Hall lettering etched into its façade, the old phone booth and the gorgeous, spiral marble staircase remains. So does the copper beech tree.

According to Northwell Health spokesperson Jason Molinet, the Patchogue office underwent a $4.7 million multiyear renovation; Northwell worked with the Town of Brookhaven to preserve the historic value of the building. The lease is for 10.5 years.

Brookhaven Supervisor Ed Romaine commented that the building sat vacant for 17 years.

“As supervisor, it was my desire to sell it,” he said. “It was a nonperforming asset and we made a major effort. We didn’t realize a lot of profit [as it sold for $850,000] because of the asbestos remediation, but now it will be an asset to Patchogue Village and the town.” The stairway mural, a Native American scene, was removed and transferred to Town Hall. “We paid $20,000 to have it removed,” Romaine said. “But it talks to the history of the town.”

Dr. Thomas McGinn, senior vice president and executive director of medicine for Northwell Health, commented on their entry into the area. “This is like a flagship for us sitting in Patchogue,” he said. “We’ve had some scattered practice sites, but the concept is that this would be a place people would want to come to, and really get the big bulk of primary specialties conveniently in one building with the electronic data shared by our doctors. We’re able to do stress testing, nuclear imaging, anti-coagulating monitoring, and a lot of new endoscopic procedures.”

McGinn said the Patchogue model was one of the first Northwell Health is attempting to establish in communities.

Six exam rooms, physicians’ offices, a nuclear testing suite, an echocardiography and vascular laboratory and stress echocardiography-testing suite take up the first floor. The second floor, with 10 exam rooms, has physicians’ offices and suites for specialized ophthalmology testing and pulmonary-function testing.

Donna Garambone, administrative director of medical services at Northwell Health Physician Partners, led the tour on the second floor, pointing out some cutting-edge additions. “The pulmonary-function testing is state of the art,” she said. “With it we use nitrogen. It’s a lot less expensive and cleaner than using helium and it’s smaller equipment.”

Several chairs near a window with computers provided a compact workstation for medical assistants and RNs. “I love these chairs,” she said. “They’re ergonomically correct and you can stand or sit.”

“There are little things we did, like an all-in-one keyboard that lights up, saves space and enables the doctor to record or check information and sit and face the patient as opposed to having their backs to them,” Garambone added.

Light blue walls and framed pictures of Long Island water and beach scenes hang in the hallways. Garambone said the stairway’s original chandelier was being installed later in the day and the staircases’ marble was being refinished.

According to Terry Lynman, chief public relations officer and senior vice president at Northwell Health, Suffolk County has been a major target, but historically they’d been in western Suffolk. “We’ve been expanding east with Huntington and Southside hospitals and Peconic Bay Medical Center,” he said. “We also have Northwell Go-Health Urgent Care locations.”

Patchogue Mayor Paul Pontieri, who was an eyewitness to the building’s metamorphosis, conducted a walk-through a couple of weeks ago.

“They did a beautiful job,” he said. “It flows well and is a great re-use of the facility and it goes back onto the tax roles. We’re very fortunate in the village to have Northwell Health with their services and Brookhaven Memorial Hospital Medical Center nearby. There are larger areas in the county that do not have the coverage we have.”

Northwell Health, formerly North Shore-LIJ, has 18 hospitals in their network that includes Long Island, Manhattan, Staten Island and Westchester County.

Some history on Old Town Hall

The walls of the spiral staircase are awash in fresh paint, with light from new windows pouring in on a tour this week. But it was a mess in July 2012.

The Native American mural was removed to Town Hall and now graces the second-floor balcony area, thanks to efforts by the current administration. They paid for asbestos remediation and interior gutting.

In a former interview, Brookhaven Town historian Barbara Russell stated that the old Brookhaven Town Hall property was purchased on March 10, 1925; it was built a year later with a dedication in the town justice hall on June 5, 1926. 

Two wings, a WPA project, were completed in 1939, said Patchogue Mayor Paul Pontieri. 

Stan Allan, patriarch of The Gateway family, was town clerk and the last staffer to leave the building on April 26, 2004. He took his chair with him.

“There are beautiful vaults in the basement from when the town clerk’s office was there,” said senior building inspector Peter Sarich. “They’re very decorative and from another time.”

Pontieri commented that initially, the property had a covenant that when the town no longer used the building as a government facility, it would revert back to the village. 

But it was a white elephant, much too big for village uses. There was vigilance to ensure it wasn’t vandalized, but not much else. There were efforts by former town councilman Tim Mazzei to establish a senior citizen center there, but that would have cost in excess of $5 million, and former congressman Tim Bishop had expressed interest to move his office there before settling on Oak Street. 

Renovation work was completed methodically and with care. Sarich confirmed that John Caffrey, a Hauppauge-based entrepreneur whose expertise is financial planning and real estate, is the owner with investors of Old Town Hall via 201-205 South Ocean Realty LLC.

The space was leased to Northwell Health last year.

Article source: https://www.longislandadvance.net/4649/From-political-power-to-the-power-of-good-health

UPDATE: Four plane crash victims declared in good health


KOIN 6 NEWS - Four people were injured in this Sunday plane crash in Sandy.

KOIN 6 NEWS - Four people were injured in this Sunday plane crash in Sandy.Four St. Helens residents sustained non-life threatening injuries after the airplane they were in crash-landed at the Sandy Kiwanis 60th Annual Fly-In Cruise-In on Sunday, July 23. The small aircraft clipped its left wing then fell nose-first into the ground upon arrival at McKinnon Airpark, 12960 S.E. Ten Eyck Road.

Sandy Fire crews standing by at the fundraising event responded immediately. Two women on board were transported and examined for further injuries at a local trauma center. The pilot’s and another passenger’s injuries did not require hospitalization.

Officials with the Federal Aviation Administration, which is working with the National Transportation Safety Board to investigate the incident, declined to release the victims’ names. Sandy Fire Chief Phil Schneider said he spoke with the pilot on Monday, July 24, and the two women were given a clean bill of health and discharged earlier that day.

“Any time there’s a traumatic event like that they enter you into the trauma center,” Schneider said. “It is fortunate everyone is doing well.”

An incident such as this is unprecedented at the annual fundraiser. Sandy Kiwanis Vice President Kole Pearson said although it was unfortunate, “It could have been worse, and we’re very fortunate it was what is was.”

The crash took place in a sparsely populated, open area of the venue and did not directly affect festival attendees or infrastructure.

“I don’t believe it affected the rest of the event,” Pearson said, though the event coordinators updated participants when the victims were declared in good health. “We’re grateful everyone in the plane and on the ground is OK.”

Article source: http://pamplinmedia.com/sp/68-news/367364-248953-update-four-plane-crash-victims-declared-in-good-health

To Your Good Health: Compartment syndrome is an emergency situation

DEAR DR. ROACH: Two months ago, my husband fell down a flight of stairs and fractured six ribs and a vertebra in his neck. He is 65 years old and was in good health before this accident. He was hospitalized in a level 1 trauma center and was doing well until 10 days after the accident, when his abdomen became very swollen. He was rushed to the emergency room and was diagnosed with abdominal compartment syndrome; he needed emergency surgery to address the swelling of his major organs. He had an ileostomy and later needed another three major surgeries, including one for a collapsed lung. Breathing issues have been a major problem; he had a breathing tube inserted for three weeks. His voice has changed. No more surgery is planned, and he is now in rehab. What causes the abdominal compartment syndrome that did so much damage, and how could it have been prevented? — B.E.

ANSWER: A “compartment syndrome” is when the pressure inside a closed system becomes high enough to affect the contents of the compartment. A compartment is a section of the body walled off by anatomic structures.

I am most familiar with compartment syndromes of an extremity. For example, there are different compartments of the arm and leg. Severe damage to a muscle can cause it to swell, increasing the pressure in the compartment so much that not enough blood can get to the injured muscle. It is a surgical emergency, requiring the opening of the compartment.

The abdomen itself is a compartment, with the anatomic structure being the lining of the abdomen. There are many possible causes for abdominal compartment syndrome. Trauma, such as what your husband suffered falling down the stairs, is among the most common. Surgery, sepsis, severe liver disease and burns also may cause ACS. ACS can cause compression of the lung, as you note. With poor blood supply to the intestine, it can lead to tissue death.

ACS is hard to diagnose, as it most commonly happens in critically ill people who cannot communicate. The physical finding of a tense, distended abdomen suggests ACS but may have many other causes, so the physicians do not always think of this condition. It’s not common; only 1 percent of trauma patients have the condition.

ACS is diagnosed by measuring the pressure in the abdomen. The easiest way to do this is by measuring the pressure of the bladder. Treatment is to open the abdomen to relieve the pressure, and the abdomen usually is left open while the organs recover. The earlier the syndrome is considered and diagnosed, the better the chances of recovery without permanent organ damage.

DEAR DR. ROACH: When at the office for a routine checkup with an appointment, how long should a patient be kept in a room waiting for the doctor? My doctor thinks it is OK to be 20 to 30 minutes past the appointment time. My last office visit was 30 minutes over time, making me late for another appointment. Do patients have any recourse or a patient bill of rights? — G.G.

ANSWER: I think a doctor should be on time, unless there is a medical emergency. A patient’s time is valuable, and I think being habitually late is unprofessional. Getting the first appointment of the day is sometimes helpful, but your ultimate recourse is to find a doctor who will treat your needs more respectfully.


Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell.edu or request an order form of available health newsletters at 628 Virginia Dr., Orlando, FL 32803. Health newsletters may be ordered from www.rbmamall.com.

Article source: http://www.dcourier.com/news/2017/jul/26/your-good-health-compartment-syndrome-emergency-si/

Missing human rights lawyer ‘in good health in Tianjin facility’

Human rights lawyer Wang Quanzhang – who had not been seen or heard from since he was detained in a crackdown two years ago – is in good health in a Tianjin facility, according to a lawyer who claims to have visited him.

While Wang’s wife, Li Wenzu, was relieved to know where he was, she said she was angry that he had been detained without trial since July 10, 2015.

Tianjin prosecutors told Li early this year that Wang had been indicted on charges of “inciting subversion of state power”, but there had been no information about any trial since then.

Isolated, tortured and mentally scarred … the plight of China’s persecuted human rights lawyers

Wang’s relatives as well as lawyers and international human rights groups have repeatedly appealed to the Chinese authorities for his release and for information on his well-being.

He had also been denied access to lawyers. However, Zhejiang-based lawyer Chen Youxi on Wednesday announced on social media that he had met Wang in a Tianjin detention facility and that he was in good health.

“I met him in person and he is doing well physically and mentally,” Chen later told the South China Morning Post.

But Li remains worried about her husband, saying that lawyers appointed by the family had not been allowed to see Wang.

“This is some sort of confirmation [that he is still alive], but I am very worried about his health and whether he’s been tortured,” Li said.

In a statement issued late on Tuesday, Li said she had been approached by two lawyers in the past 10 days who claimed to have met Wang.

“My lawyers have tried their best to gain access to Wang in over 40 attempts over the past two years but they’ve been barred by the authorities,” Li said. “I’m very angry and do not wish to be approached by any more government-appointed lawyers.”

Human rights lawyer swept up in ‘709 crackdown’ to face court in Tianjin for subversion

Chen said on social media that he was informed by the Tianjin judicial authorities on July 12 that Wang had requested Chen as his lawyer. He said he arrived the next day and met Wang, but the detained rights lawyer changed his mind and decided to defend himself instead.

The post included an appointment letter purportedly signed by Wang and a photo of Chen posing outside the Tianjin No 2 Detention Centre.

Wang has represented a number of defendants in rights cases including Jiangsu-based Falun Gong practitioner Zhu Yanian in 2013.

Prominent Chinese rights lawyer gets suspended jail term in closed trial

He has said he was assaulted by police in Heilongjiang province in 2014 during a rally for other lawyers who had been beaten and persecuted at a detention centre in the city of Jiamusi.

Some 300 lawyers, legal assistants and dissidents were detained in a crackdown on legal activists that began on July 9, 2015. Most of them were released but nine were convicted and at least five, including Wang, are still in custody without trial, according to the China Human Rights Lawyers Concern Group.

Article source: http://www.scmp.com/news/china/policies-politics/article/2104246/missing-human-rights-lawyer-good-health-tianjin

To Your Good Health: Yogurt is an effective preventative for reader’s …

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Article source: http://www.roanoke.com/life/columns_and_blogs/columns/to_your_good_health/to-your-good-health-yogurt-is-an-effective-preventative-for/article_08b3db25-196d-5b7b-a956-3fc2211b4de8.html

Canadians’ Strong Health Literacy Scores Tied to Good Health Status, But Navigating Health System Remains a …

Today Marks International Self-Care Day – New Survey on Canadians and Health Literacy

OTTAWA, July 24, 2017 /CNW/ – According to a new survey by Consumer Health Products Canada (CHP Canada), Canadians with higher health literacy scores tend to enjoy better health. Overall, the health literacy of Canadians compares well with Europeans in terms of health knowledge and disease prevention, though Canadians struggle more with navigating the healthcare system, while finding it a little easier to judge their different treatment options.

On International Self-Care Day, the findings suggest that Canadians are well positioned to practice responsible self-care in their daily lives. “The strong association between high health literacy and good health shows how important this issue is to Canadians,” says Karen Proud, President of CHP Canada. 

The survey was based on an approach developed by the European Health Literacy Project and looked at knowledge of healthcare, disease prevention and health promotion, while also exploring information processing and health related decision making. Respondents were then grouped together into four segments, characterizing their health literacy as either excellent, sufficient, problematic or inadequate. Overall, 73% of Canadians fell into the “excellent” or “sufficient” categories, compared to 61% of Dutch, 60% of Irish, 56% of Poles and 54% of Germans.

However, the survey also shows that, like Europeans, Canadians can find it challenging to judge the reliability of health information other than the information they get from their doctor or pharmacist. Canadians also struggle in other areas:

  • 23% of Canadians find it “fairly difficult” or “very difficult” to find out where to get professional help when they are ill, compared to only 5% of Dutch, 9% of Irish, 13% of Germans and 14% of Poles;

  • 54% of Canadians found it “fairly difficult” or “very difficult” to judge when to seek a second opinion from another doctor, compared to 46% of Dutch, 45% of Germans, 38% of Irish and just 25% of Poles.

Other Statistics on Canadians and health literacy:

  • 89% of Canadians use their doctor for health advice vs 67% for pharmacists;

  • 53% of Canadians find it difficult to judge the reliability of information on health risk in the media;

  • 36% of Canadians find it difficult to find information on how to manage health problems like stress and depression;

  • 35% of Canadians find it difficult to judge different treatment options;

  • 34% of Canadians find it difficult to judge which health screenings they should have.

“On International Self-Care Day, we are encouraging Canadians to continue to practice responsible self-care and it begins with health literacy, the foundation of the seven pillars of self-care,” says Ms. Proud. 

What is Self-Care?

We all practice self-care by doing the following things for ourselves and our families: 

  • Get a good night’s sleep

  • Get regular physical activity

  • Not smoking

  • Eat a healthy diet

  • Brush our teeth

  • Apply sunscreen

  • Take a nutritional supplement, if needed

  • Treat minor ailments like allergies, coughs and colds, headaches and heartburn with home remedies or OTC medications, used as directed

  • Treat minor scrapes and bruises

What can YOU do when it comes to self-care?

  • Discuss your self-care options with your doctor or pharmacist at your next visit;

  • Look for credible sources of health information such as provincial and federal government health portals, websites associated with accredited health institutions or professions, and other evidence-based sources;

  • Always read and follow the label directions when using consumer health products;

A previous survey by CHP Canada highlighted that if 1/7 of Canadians practiced more self-care, 500,000 Canadians who currently don’t have access to a family doctor could get one.

About Consumer Health Products Canada:

CHP Canada is the industry association representing the companies that make evidence-based over-the-counter medicines and natural health products. These are the products you can find in medicine cabinets in every Canadian home.  From sunscreens and vitamins, to pain relievers and allergy medications, people use consumer health products to maintain their health and manage their minor ailments. This is a fundamental part of self-care which is vital to the health of Canadians and the sustainability of our healthcare system.

International Self-Care Day (July 24th) was developed by the International Self-Care Foundation, a UK charity with a global focus.

Consumer Health Products Canada Research
* The survey was conducted online by Redfern Research between July 5 and July 12 with a sample of 2,114 Canadians. Respondents were screened to identify those who reside in Canada and are 18 years of age or older.

 

SOURCE Consumer Health Products Canada/CHP Canada

Article source: http://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/Canadians-Strong-Health-Literacy-Scores-Tied-to-Good-Health-Status-But-Navigating-Health-System-Remains-a-Challenge-593035