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Kaiser Permanente Helps Oakland International Airport Passengers Reduce Stress and Maintain Good Mental Health

“Our work with the Port of Oakland is a natural extension of our mission to improve the health of the communities we serve,” said Janet Liang, president, Kaiser Permanente Northern California. “We understand people have an opportunity to experience good health habits where they live, work, play and in this case, travel. Our airport expression is another example of our commitment to creating positive environments throughout the Bay Area community Kaiser Permanente has called home for almost 75 years.”

The new features at OAK Terminal 2 include:

The living wall: Taking up the entire west wall of the security checkpoint area, the wall contains 34 unique plant species, including 13 that, according to a NASA study, help clean indoor air naturally and improve the ambient environment.

Bringing the outdoors in: Travelers are greeted by large white clouds suspended from the checkpoint and atrium ceiling. Soothing sounds of nature can be heard from speakers strategically placed near the checkpoint area. Messages on panels throughout the checkpoint encourage passengers to “breathe in,” “relax” and “thrive.”

H2O to go: Passengers will be able to refill their reusable bottles at new hydration stations, installed just past the security checkpoint. The stations dispense premium purified drinking water to help keep passengers hydrated before and during their flight.

These elements are all aimed at alleviating the anxiety, frustration and fear commonly felt by travelers, and they are part of a much broader effort by Kaiser Permanente to improve mental health and wellness in the communities it serves. This larger effort includes, but is not limited to, the Find Your Words public service campaign to de-stigmatize depression and Kaiser Permanente’s Thriving Schools Program, which includes efforts to improve the emotional and social well-being of students and staff. 

“Support for emotional health and well-being is built into Kaiser Permanente’s overall approach to total health,” said Don Mordecai, MD, the national leader for mental health and wellness at Kaiser Permanente. “Our goal with transforming Terminal 2 is to help improve the travel experience for people and to help them find a bit of calm in what can often be a stressful environment.”

“We are thrilled to welcome Kaiser Permanente’s contribution to the ongoing transformation of Terminal 2 at Oakland International Airport. This uplifting introduction at the screening checkpoint positively influences the early stages of the passenger experience,” said Bryant L. Francis, Port of Oakland director of aviation. “This addition at OAK creates a more relaxing environment for outbound travelers as well as the hundreds of employees based in Terminal 2.”

About Kaiser Permanente
Kaiser Permanente is committed to helping shape the future of health care. We are recognized as one of America’s leading health care providers and not-for-profit health plans. Founded in 1945, Kaiser Permanente has a mission to provide high-quality, affordable health care services and to improve the health of our members and the communities we serve. We currently serve more than 12.2 million members in eight states and the District of Columbia. Care for members and patients is focused on their total health and guided by their personal Permanente Medical Group physicians, specialists and team of caregivers. Our expert and caring medical teams are empowered and supported by industry-leading technology advances and tools for health promotion, disease prevention, state-of-the-art care delivery and world-class chronic disease management. Kaiser Permanente is dedicated to care innovations, clinical research, health education and the support of community health. For more information, go to: kp.org/share.

About Oakland International Airport
Oakland International is the fourth busiest airport in California and second busiest in the San Francisco Bay Area. Serving over 13 million travelers annually, OAK is the closest airport to the region’s top business and tourism venues. It is also the closest airport for most local residents. Oakland’s air service roster to over 60 nonstop destinations is offered on 12 different airline brands. The vision of Oakland International Airport is to offer customers a world-class experience and be the airport of choice for Bay Area residents and visitors alike. OAK is operated by the Port of Oakland, which also oversees the Oakland seaport and 20 miles of waterfront. Together with its business partners, the Port supports more than 73,000 jobs in the region and nearly 827,000 jobs across the United States.

For more information, contact:
Marc Brown, Marc.T.Brown@kp.org, 510-271-6328
Kari Clark, Kari.Clark@creation.io, 408-768-2889

SOURCE Kaiser Permanente

Related Links

http://www.kaiserpermanente.org

Article source: https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/kaiser-permanente-helps-oakland-international-airport-passengers-reduce-stress-and-maintain-good-mental-health-300751879.html

Sucking on your baby’s pacifier to clean it may be good for their health, study says

The study suggests babies may receive “healthy oral bacteria that will affect the early development of their child’s immune system,” when a pacifier is cleaned in this way.

The study suggests babies may receive “healthy oral bacteria that will affect the early development of their child’s immune system,” when a pacifier is cleaned in this way.
(iStock)

Could sucking on your baby’s pacifier reduce their risk of developing asthma and allergies? According to a new study, it just might.

In a study released Friday by the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit, Mich., researchers found babies had a “lower level” of the antibody Immunoglobulin E, or IgE, when their parents sucked on their pacifier to clean it. IgE is “linked to the development of allergies and asthma,” according to the study.

BOY WHO LOST LEGS TO MENINGITIS AS A NEWBORN LEARNS TO WALK ON PROSTHETIC LIMBS

While more research is needed, and experts caution parents not to conclude that sucking on the pacifier is a sure way to prevent the development of allergies or asthma in their child, the study suggests babies may receive “healthy oral bacteria that will affect the early development of their child’s immune system” when a pacifier is cleaned in this way.

To come to this conclusion, researchers with the Henry Ford Health System asked 128 different mothers how they cleaned their baby’s pacifier. Of those 128, 53 said they cleaned it with soap and water, 30 said they sterilized it either using the dishwasher or boiling water, while nine said they sucked on the pacifier to clean it.

Then, after comparing their babies’ IgE levels at different stages of life — birth, six months and then 18 months — researchers found babies whose pacifiers were cleaned by the sucking method had a “significantly” lower IgE level at 18 months of age compared to the other babies.

“Although we can’t say there’s a cause and effect relationship, we can say the microbes a child is exposed to early on in life will affect their immune system development,” Eliane Abou-Jaoude, an allergist fellow with the health system and the study’s lead author, said in an online statement.

DOC: 2 BOYS KILLED IN NJ OUTBREAK WERE IN ‘IRREVERSIBLE SHOCK’ WHEN THEY ARRIVED AT HOSPITAL

“From our data, we can tell that the children whose pacifiers were cleaned by their parents sucking on the pacifier, those children had lower IgE levels around 10 months of age through 18 months of age,” she added.

As the Henry Ford Health System researchers note, their findings parallel a 2013 Swedish study. At that time, researchers in Sweden also concluded the “parental sucking of their infant’s pacifier may reduce the risk of allergy development, possibly via immune stimulation by microbes transferred to the infant via the parent’s saliva.”

Article source: https://www.foxnews.com/health/sucking-on-babys-pacifier-to-clean-it-may-be-good-for-their-health-study-says

Is Queen Elizabeth II in Good Health?

Queen Elizabeth II is wearing a blue suit dress and a hat. Queen Elizabeth II | Alan Crowhurst/Getty Images

Queen Elizabeth II has been England’s monarch for more than six decades so it’s hard to imagine a time when she will no longer be on the throne. However, the public is well aware that Her Majesty is in her ’90s and that is why there’s always chatter and concerns over her health especially when she unexpectedly misses a royal event or outing.

We know she has scaled back on public outings and some royal duties in recent years but in November 2018, when she was missing from a photo many expected to see her in, rumors about her health made headlines again.

Here’s more on why she wasn’t in that important photo, plus what we know about the state of Queen Elizabeth II’s health and what the palace believes she will die from.

How healthy is Queen Elizabeth II?

At the end of 2016, concerns over the queen’s health were high when it was reported that she had a “heavy cold” and missed several traditional holiday events. Since then though, Queen Elizabeth II reportedly has had a clean bill of health.

Something to note is that she never smoked although several members of her family did. “Both her father and her sister smoked, but it never attracted her. It was something that just didn’t appeal,” her former press secretary, Dickie Arbiter, told the BBC.

Many of her relatives died from smoking-related illnesses which could be one of the reasons the queen never picked up the habit.

Her Majesty does drink, however, not heavily as previously reported and she can thank her mother, who lived to be 101, for good genes.

The Queen Mother and Queen Elizabeth II The Queen Mother and Queen Elizabeth II | GERRY PENNY/AFP/Getty Images)

“If you have parents and grandparents who made it into their eighties and nineties there is a chance you have inherited good genes.,” said Professor Sarah Harper from the Oxford Institute of Population Ageing. “You are more likely to have a strong immune system and are less likely to develop chronic diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular problems.”

How the palace thinks she will die

Despite this, the palace does think she will die after battling an illness.

The Guardian noted that plans for her death have already clearly been laid out and Buckingham Palace officials envision her to die in her bed, surrounded by her loved ones, after suffering from a short illness. They also hope in her final hours that she will be able to say goodbye to those dear to her.

When the queen’s mom passed away in 2002, at the Royal Lodge in Windsor, she had time to call her friends a final time and even spoke about which of them she was giving away some of her horses to.

Why Queen Elizabeth wasn’t in the photo

The palace released precious family portraits just ahead of Prince Charles 70th birthday. In addition to the Prince of Wales, Prince William, Kate Middleton, Prince George, Princess Charlotte, Prince Louis, Prince Harry, Meghan Markle, and Camilla Parker Bowles were all featured smiling in the photo. However, Queen Elizabeth was missing from the family picture leaving many to speculate about why.

Two new photographs of The Prince of Wales and his family have been released to celebrate HRH’s 70th birthday. The photos were taken by @chrisjacksongetty in the garden of Clarence House.

A post shared by Clarence House (@clarencehouse) on Nov 13, 2018 at 2:04pm PST

People figured Her Majesty would be in the photo to mark her son’s milestone birthday. So why wasn’t she?

Well, there is no reason to think she was missing because she was ill. In fact, she hosted a party for Charles hours after that portrait was taken in which she gave a touching speech to her son.

The reason she was not in the family portrait may have been her way of passing the baton and reminding everyone about who the future monarchs will be.

Read more: Does Queen Elizabeth II Have Any Close Friends?

Check out The Cheat Sheet on Facebook!

Article source: https://www.cheatsheet.com/entertainment/is-queen-elizabeth-ii-in-good-health.html/

People Living with HIV: Take the ‘Good Health Is More Than Health Care’ Quiz!

SPRINGFIELD, Ill.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Nov 15, 2018–As part of a continuing effort to assist people living with HIV who are affected by social determinants of health, Illinois HIV Care Connect today introduced “ Good Health Is More Than Health Care” web content to support the “ Good Health Is More Than Health Care” Quiz. People living with HIV are encouraged to review the content and take the quiz.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20181115005556/en/

People Living with HIV: Take the ‘Good Health Is More Than Health Care’ Quiz! (Graphic: Business Wire)

The content and a link to the quiz can be found at https://hivcareconnect.com/good-health. The quiz can be found at https://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/4562185/Good-Health-Is-More-Than-Health-Care-Quiz.

For people living with HIV, regularly seeing a doctor and taking anti-HIV medications are very important. But research shows that the social and economic conditions in which they live, learn and work have a tremendous impact on their health, as well. The “Good Health Is More Than Health Care” campaign is designed to help people living with HIV to manage these conditions, which are known as “social determinants of health.”

These determinants include things such as food insecurity, health care costs, housing instability, language barriers, lack of access to dental and mental health care, child care responsibilities, substance abuse, transportation needs, utility stress, and more.

For example:

— The U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates that one of eight Americans – 42 million people, including 13 million children – lack consistent access to enough food for an active, healthy life.

— People living with HIV sometimes risk falling behind on payments and losing their housing due to increased medical costs and having a reduced ability to work.

— According to the American Hospital Association, more than 3.6 million people in the United States do not obtain medical care because they lack a vehicle, access to public transportation, or the money to buy a ticket. Missed or delayed health care appointments result in poorer health outcomes and higher costs.

Illinois HIV Care Connect can help enrollees to overcome social and economic obstacles

People living with HIV who enroll in Illinois HIV Care Connect may qualify for programs that may provide assistance in overcoming some of these social and economic obstacles. Among these programs are Medicaid, Medicare, the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, the ADAP Medication Assistance Program (MAP), the CHIC Premium Assistance Program (PAP), Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA), and others.

“The ‘Good Health Is More Than Health Care’ campaign encourages people living with HIV to enroll in Illinois HIV Care Connect while reminding those already enrolled of the program’s benefits,” said Michael Maginn, HIV project manager for the Illinois Public Health Association, which manages the Illinois HIV Care Connect program with funding from the Illinois Department of Public Health.

Depending on a person’s needs and income level, these benefits may include access to medical, dental and mental health care, including child health care and treatment for substance abuse; assistance paying health insurance premiums or purchasing HIV medications; and obtaining necessary food, housing, utilities, and medically related transportation. An Illinois HIV Care Connect case manager helps enrollees to determine which benefits they quality for.

People living with HIV in Illinois may contact the closest of seven regional offices to learn more about how Illinois HIV Care Connect can help them live healthy with HIV. Not all services may be available, and the nature of services may vary, by regional office.

WAND-TV, WSIU-TV and the State Journal-Register have completed stories featuring the “Good Health Is More Than Health Care” Quiz.

About Illinois HIV Care Connect

Illinois HIV Care Connect is a statewide network providing medical case management, health care and support services to people living with HIV. About 45,000 Illinois residents are estimated to be living with HIV. Illinois HIV Care Connect lead agency offices located in Rockford, Peoria, Springfield, Belleville, Murphysboro, Champaign and Chicago serve people living with HIV in all of Illinois’ 102 counties. https://hivcareconnect.com

View source version on businesswire.com:https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20181115005556/en/

CONTACT: Media contact:

Ray Valek

ray@valekco.com

708-352-8695

KEYWORD: UNITED STATES NORTH AMERICA ILLINOIS

INDUSTRY KEYWORD: WOMEN EDUCATION OTHER EDUCATION HEALTH AIDS DENTAL FITNESS NUTRITION INFECTIOUS DISEASES OTHER HEALTH CONSUMER GAY LESBIAN MEN MANAGED CARE

SOURCE: Illinois HIV Care Connect

Copyright Business Wire 2018.

PUB: 11/15/2018 09:19 AM/DISC: 11/15/2018 09:19 AM

http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20181115005556/en

Article source: https://www.apnews.com/399a5cd3807e4f42b8a7ae5fafd082ef

Your Good Health: Screening fails to reduce pancreatic cancer deaths

Dear Dr. Roach: It is my understanding that there is no early-screening test for pancreatic cancer, and it is typically not diagnosed until it is very advanced, hence the high mortality rate. My late loved one’s case was confirmed only after having a CT scan; not even an MRI revealed the tumours. A prominent person’s case was found early enough to be successfully treated only because she was a colon cancer survivor and a routine CT scan that was done as part of her follow-up revealed an early and treatable tumour in her pancreas. Why can’t CT scans be done routinely to check for pancreatic tumours?

S.C.

It’s a very good question, and one I am often asked, not only about cancer of the pancreas but also about ovarian cancer. The answer is that pancreatic cancer is uncommon (one to two people per 10,000 per year), and there are very few cases where the cancer can be found early enough to make a difference. Every study done so far on screening for pancreatic cancer has shown no reduction in the rate of death from pancreatic cancer. Even when found early by CT, ultrasound or blood testing, it usually is already too late for most. While I rejoice for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, to whom I think you refer, she was one of the lucky few.

A reasonable follow-up might be: Even if screening only saves a few people, isn’t it worth doing? Unfortunately, there are downsides to screening. There are dollar costs of the tests. CT scans in particular have radiation, which if repeated, over time can increase the risk of developing other kinds of cancers. More importantly, scans can show findings that appear to be cancer or another abnormality, but on surgical biopsy turn out to be nothing important. This causes people to be operated on unnecessarily. So far, the harms of screening, even though they seem small, outweigh the much smaller chance of finding a curable cancer.

It is possible that breakthroughs in treatment will lead to a new era for pancreatic cancer, where formerly incurable disease can be successfully treated. If (hopefully when) that happens, screening then may be re-evaluated.

I should note that this discussion applies to people with no known risk factors for pancreatic cancer. Perhaps 10 to 15 per cent of pancreatic cancer has a familial component. People with a strong family history of pancreatic cancer or those with a genetic condition that predisposes to pancreatic cancer (such as BRCA2 or BRCA1) should consider enrolling in a study or finding a centre with expertise in screening high-risk people for pancreatic cancer, where testing is more likely to have benefit.

Dear Dr. Roach: I have mandibular tori. What in the world got this started? Was it medication or something catching, like from the dentist? I am 92 and don’t want it to get worse.

I.L.

The mandible is the lower jaw, and a torus is a bony growth. They usually are present on both sides, so they are called tori. A torus also can be present on the hard palate. They may grow slowly over time.

It’s not clear where they come from, but they are more common in men and in people who grind their teeth, so they are thought to arise from stress in the bone. They are of no concern and do not need to be treated unless they are bothering you. Occasionally, they get so big that they interfere with eating or speech. If that’s the case, they can be treated surgically. Tori are quite common, but I have never referred a patient with a torus for surgery.

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell.edu.

 

Article source: https://www.timescolonist.com/life/health/your-good-health-screening-fails-to-reduce-pancreatic-cancer-deaths-1.23498232

Good Health: Whole grains and type 2 diabetes

While eating whole grains is healthy for you, research has discovered another benefit to eating more natural wheat


Copyright 2018 by WDIV ClickOnDetroit – All rights reserved.

Article source: https://www.clickondetroit.com/health/good-health/good-health-whole-grains-and-type-2-diabetes

Your Good Health: Should a transplant patient get Shingrix?

Dear Dr. Roach: My son is a kidney transplant recipient. Is it safe for transplant recipients to get the new Shingrix vaccine?

J.O.

Because the Shingrix vaccine is not a live vaccine, it is thought to be safe. It is licensed for immunocompromised people, like your son, but transplant recipients were not included in the published trials.

As such, the U.S. Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has not made an official endorsement as of this writing.
However, many experts do recommend the vaccine for people on the kind of immune-suppression drugs used for solid-organ transplant recipients.

People with profound immune system disease, such as those receiving chemotherapy or people with very advanced HIV disease, may not respond to the vaccine.

People taking lower-dose immune system modifying drugs (such as a dose of prednisone that’s 20 mg or less a day, low-dose methotrexate or azathioprine) generally should receive the vaccine, but the jury is still out for people with diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, who are taking biologic therapies such as rituximab (Rituxan) or adalimumab (Humira).

Studies are ongoing, and the ACIP and other advisory groups will make new recommendations as data become available.

Until then, your son should talk with his transplant doctors about the vaccine.

Dear Dr. Roach: I am a 58-year-old male who has never had chickenpox. Ten years ago, after bloodwork to confirm no exposure to chickenpox, my doctor gave me the required two sets of the chickenpox vaccine in order to build immunity.

My question is this: Since you can get shingles only if you have had chickenpox in the past, should I consider getting the new Shingrix vaccine?

Or would this be a waste of money? I also should say that I am HIV positive for 22 years with no symptoms, and no opportunistic infections.

B.D.

Unfortunately, people who have not had chickenpox but who have had the varicella vaccine (the live vaccine usually given to children to prevent chickenpox) still may get shingles.

The risk is low: For every 50 people given the varicella vaccine, about one person will get shingles in 20 years. However, the risk in someone with HIV infection would be expected to be somewhat higher, even in someone who has been as well-controlled as you have.

You definitely should consider the Shingrix vaccine. Whether it’s a waste of money is hard to say. It reduces your risk of shingles from fairly small to very small.

You, personally, have possibly less risk because you had the weakened vaccine strain of chickenpox rather than “natural” or “wild-type” chickenpox, but then you have a slightly higher risk due to your HIV infection.

The downside of getting it is a sore arm (less likely is a more severe reaction) and some money (though most insurances cover it in the U.S.).

The upside is that you’d have a lower risk of getting shingles, which is painful and unpleasant, and which in the rare case can cause serious disease.

You also reduce your risk of post-herpetic neuralgia, a potentially devastating complication that lasts weeks to months (sometimes years) and dramatically reduces quality of life.

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell.edu.

 

Article source: https://www.timescolonist.com/life/health/your-good-health-should-a-transplant-patient-get-shingrix-1.23496625

To Your Good Health: Organ transplant, HIV-positive: Who should get Shingrix?

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Article source: https://www.roanoke.com/arts_and_entertainment/to_your_good_health/to-your-good-health-organ-transplant-hiv-positive-who-should/article_8bbcce8a-1680-5465-b960-558ebf87633d.html

Your Good Health: Woman with aches, pains has high iron levels

Dear Dr. Roach: I’m a 70-year-old woman. Last October, during my annual physical, blood tests showed that my iron levels were extremely high.

My doctor did additional blood tests for hemochromatosis and concluded that I didn’t have it.

She suggested that I donate blood every three months to keep the iron levels down, which I have been doing for a year.

Every time I donate, they comment on how high my iron levels are and ask if I’m taking iron supplements (I’m not) or eating a lot of iron-rich foods (no).

I am otherwise healthy, except for aches and pains, and being tired all the time.

Should I be concerned about the iron levels?

I know that with hemochromatosis, the iron is deposited in vital organs and causes damage.

Could this be happening to me?

P.C.

Hemochromatosis is a common but often unrecognized genetic condition caused by an inability to regulate iron absorption.

Iron is absorbed as much as possible, all the time, even if the body doesn’t need it.

You are right that the iron can affect many tissues of the body, particularly damaging the heart and liver, but also predisposing to certain infections and to diabetes.

Your aches and pains also are concerning for joint symptoms, common in hereditary hemochromatosis.

Women who are menstruating have a degree of protection from iron overload, since women lose a quantity of blood each month in menses.

Often, women do not become symptomatic until years after menopause. However, this protection is not perfect and there are clearly cases of severe disease in young women.

I don’t have enough information to comment on how likely it is that you might have hemochromatosis.

Blood tests can lead a doctor to suspect the diagnosis, and in some cases, can make the diagnosis with high certainty, such as in a person with iron overload by blood testing (a high ferritin level, and a high percentage of bound iron in the blood) combined with a positive genetic test.

The diagnosis also can be made by liver biopsy.

I am concerned that the frequent blood donations may have made it harder to make the diagnosis in you, and I’d recommend a consultation with a hemochromatosis expert.

I have known both gastroenterologists and hematologists with particular expertise in diagnosing this condition. Treatment is removing the blood, often through donation.

My first patient with this condition required 70 units of blood to be removed before his iron levels came back into the normal range.

Dear Dr. Roach: What is your opinion on a diet that tells you what to eat according to your blood type?

C.T.

There have been no good studies to show better outcomes for a particular type of diet based on blood type.

No matter your blood type, most people do better with fewer processed foods, less red meat, more fruits, vegetables and legumes, and for people who like them, fish and nuts.

The majority of grains should be whole grains, and simple sugars should be minimized.

Some of the dietary advice I have read suggesting individualized diet based on blood type are still better diets than a typical Western diet.

So changing a diet may not be bad, but I still would recommend choosing a diet based on preference rather than blood type.

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell.edu.

 

Article source: https://www.timescolonist.com/life/health/your-good-health-woman-with-aches-pains-has-high-iron-levels-1.23495743

Healthy Bod: Freeze your way to good health inside a Naples sauna-style cryotherapy chamber


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Derek Carlson receives whole body cryotherapy in the single room chamber on Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018, at US Cryotherapy in North Naples. Carlson has had two major injuries and says cryotherapy has helped his recovery immensely. They've put me back together, he said.Patrick Dearborn adjusts his mask before receiving whole body cryotherapy in the single room chamber on Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018, at US Cryotherapy in North Naples. Dearborn started receiving cryotherapy in August and comes in about five times a week.Patrick Dearborn leaves the single room chamber after receiving whole body cryotherapy on Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018, at US Cryotherapy in North Naples.Derek Carlson receives whole body cryotherapy in the single room chamber on Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018, at US Cryotherapy in North Naples.Chris Miller performs a localized cryotherapy treatment on Patrick Dearborn on Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018, at US Cryotherapy in North Naples.Patrick Dearborn, left, and Derek Carlson, right, receive NormaTec compression after their full body cryotherapy on Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018, at US Cryotherapy in North Naples. Carlson and Dearborn have known each other for over a decade, and Carlson is the one who pushed Dearborn to start receiving cryotherapy.

  • Derek Carlson receives whole body cryotherapy in the single room chamber on Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018, at US Cryotherapy in North Naples. Carlson has had two major injuries and says cryotherapy has helped his recovery immensely. They've put me back together, he said.1 of 6
  • Patrick Dearborn adjusts his mask before receiving whole body cryotherapy in the single room chamber on Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018, at US Cryotherapy in North Naples. Dearborn started receiving cryotherapy in August and comes in about five times a week.2 of 6
  • Patrick Dearborn leaves the single room chamber after receiving whole body cryotherapy on Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018, at US Cryotherapy in North Naples.3 of 6
  • Derek Carlson receives whole body cryotherapy in the single room chamber on Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018, at US Cryotherapy in North Naples.4 of 6
  • Chris Miller performs a localized cryotherapy treatment on Patrick Dearborn on Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018, at US Cryotherapy in North Naples.5 of 6
  • Patrick Dearborn, left, and Derek Carlson, right, receive NormaTec compression after their full body cryotherapy on Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018, at US Cryotherapy in North Naples. Carlson and Dearborn have known each other for over a decade, and Carlson is the one who pushed Dearborn to start receiving cryotherapy.6 of 6


Editor’s note: This is part of a new series looking at unique health and beauty treatments offered in Southwest Florida. 

Earlier version of the story reported US Cryotherapy uses liquid nitrogen as part of its whole body treatment, however the company only uses refrigerated cold air. 

You can rock to Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody” as subzero temps are blasted on your body inside a sauna-style, walk-in cryotherapy chamber. 

That’s what high school football coach Patrick Dearborn, 50, does about five days a week at US Cryotherapy in North Naples. Except, he chooses a different song every time. 

“When I walk out of here it’s like I’ve had five cups of coffee. I feel great, and I still sleep like a baby at night,” said Dearborn, who works in real estate and coaches at First Baptist Academy. 

He started coming to the center in August after years of suffering from pack pain, which he attributes to his days playing college rugby and serving in the Army. Dearborn does nearly every treatment provided at the center, including whole body cryotherapy. He’s also brought in many of his players after practices to recover. 

More: Healthy snacks in vending machines catches on

Dearborn was part of a steady flow of customers on a recent Thursday afternoon receiving different treatments at the health facility tucked inside the Shoppes at Vanderbilt. 

Near the entrance, a row of comfy recliners allows individuals to sit comfortably and undergo NormaTec therapy ($25 for 30 minutes), which uses a compression device around the legs designed for recovery and rehab

The whole body cryotherapy chamber ($40 per session) is visible from the front desk. There’s a private area to change clothes and two rooms for individuals to receive localized therapy (starting at $15) or facial rejuvenation ($35 per session).

“We get everyone from 11- to 12-year-olds to 90-year-olds, and both men and women,” said Michelle Nolan, co-owner of US Cryotherapy in Naples.

For the past three years, she’s owned the franchise alongside her husband, Roger. US Cryotherapy is based out of California and has nearly 30 locations nationwide. Nolan and her husband said they saw firsthand the benefits of cryotherapy and, after moving from Dallas to Naples, they wanted to bring that service here. 

In the past decade, cryotherapy, especially the whole body treatment, has grown in popularity in the U.S. 

People like Los Angeles Lakers basketball player LeBron James and Hollywood movie star Mark Wahlberg have publicly shared their cryotherapy recovery regimen on social media.

The first whole body cryotherapy chamber was built in Japan in the late 1970s, and it was introduced to Europe in the ’80s before coming here. 

How does whole body cryotherapy work?  

Say goodbye to palm trees and sunshine and hello to winter.

Cryotherapy, also known as cold therapy, is the use of low temperatures in medical therapy.

Whole body cryotherapy uses subzero temperatures to activate a fight-or-flight response in the individual’s central nervous system. The cold air is said to release endorphins and enhance circulation, which results in pain relief, mood elevation and anti-inflammation. 

At US Cryotherapy in Naples, the 2½- to 3½-minute treatment helps with chronic pain, athletic injury and overall wellness. 

It works by blasting refrigerated cold air on an individual standing inside the chamber. It’s so cold that small ice flurries fall from the ceiling due to the mix of humidity.

You’re asked to wear minimal clothing to get the full effects. It’s recommended men wear shorts and women a crop top and shorts. 

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The facility provides everyone with thick gloves, slippers, tube socks, a face mask and ear protection to avoid cold-related injuries.

Before going in, individuals choose a song they want to listen to, which is then blasted through speakers inside the chamber. Some people stand still or stretch during the treatment.

The center’s staff monitors their body temperatures throughout the short treatment. 

Skin temperatures average around 90 degrees prior to treatment, Nolan said. 

“As long as temperature drops between 30 and 45 degrees inside the chamber then we know the central nervous system is activated,” Nolan said. 

The amount of time a person is allotted to spend in the chamber depends on body size and mass, Nolan said. 

Once Dearborn exited the chamber, his friend Derek Carlson, 45, arrived for therapy. Also a regular customer, he suffered from juvenile arthritis and is prone to inflammation, which is why he does the whole body treatment often.

“Going through this, it’s like I come out of it with more energy. My body doesn’t hurt as much,” Carlson said.

Other cryotherapy services available

  • Localized therapy: A three-minute spot treatment on the area of pain or inflammation. While cold air is applied to the area, skin temps are monitored by staff to prevent injury. The therapy helps treat a sore neck or back and can also help migraine sufferers. 
  • Facial rejuvenation: An eight-minute cold air facial that promotes blood flow, reduces pores, and helps with fine lines and wrinkles. 
  • Cryoskin 2.0: This skin therapy helps produce slimming and toning on different parts of the body. It complements dieting and exercising. 
  • NormaTec compression: A 10- to 30-minute session of pulsating compression using sleeve systems.

Benefits of cryotherapy

Nolan said individuals come in for a variety of reasons, and some visit more often than others. 

“Some people with autoimmune disorders come in every day,” she said. 

“We have athletes that come in a couple days a week for recovery, depending how much they’re pushing themselves.

“And then we have some people who come in occasionally to add it to their well-being regimen, and it helps them to feel better. It can also help with anti-aging and sleep.”

Who shouldn’t do this

Anyone who recently had a heart attack or suffers from a seizure disorder, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or a serious cold allergy. 

Each individual is asked to sign a waiver before receiving any treatment, Nolan said, and clients have to be honest about any pre-existing conditions. 

Other cryotherapy centers in SWFL

» COOL Cryo Spa; 1575 Pine Ridge Road, Naples; 239-658-2665

» Orange Cryo Wellness; 4125 U.S. 41 N., Naples; 239-300-0841

» ApothiCare360; 6631 Orion Drive, Suite 112, Fort Myers; 239-690-7700

US Cryotherapy in Naples

Where: 2349 Vanderbilt Beach Road, Suite 504, North Naples

Hours: 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays; 10 a.m.- 4 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays

Cost: First-time specials and package and membership deals available

Info: For prices or to book an appointment, call 239-325-9050 or visit www.uscryotherapy.com/location/naples-fl/

Article source: https://www.naplesnews.com/story/news/health/2018/11/13/naples-cryotherapy-center-promotes-freezing-your-way-good-health/1774062002/