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A 95-year-old shares eight tips for good health in old age

I stop eating when I feel full. It's the simplest way to maintain weight Joy Chappell says.

“I stop eating when I feel full.” It’s the simplest way to maintain weight Joy Chappell says.

New research has revealed New Zealand’s average life expectancy is continuing to climb among both men and women.

While Kiwis are living longer it’s not to say we’re living better quality lives.

A study published in The Lancet this week reveals that across the developed world life expectancies continue to climb, pushing above 90 for the first time. South Korean women born in 2030 are expected to live to 90.82 on average. 

Joy Chappell enjoys good health at 95-years-old thanks to a positive outlook, exercise and a hearty breakfast.

Joy Chappell enjoys good health at 95-years-old thanks to a positive outlook, exercise and a hearty breakfast.

New Zealand men born in 2030 rank 6th with an expected life of 83.6 on average, while Kiwi women place 16th with an average life expectancy of 86.

READ MORE:
*Life expectancy study shows many to live beyond 90 by 2030
Are we really ready to live to 100?
NZ life expectancy among world’s best
The secrets to ageing well

 

“We may be living longer, but it’s worthwhile asking if we’re living better. There will likely be more people living with some kind of disability or illness,” says University of Otago professor Tim Wilkinson. 

“While we expect the average age to level off at some point it shows no sign of doing so.” he says.

If 90 is going to become the new norm then what can we do to maintain good health in our twilight years?

Mt Maunganui resident Joy Chappell is 95-years-old and enjoys a healthy, active lifestyle. She attributes her longlife and health to a number of long-held routines and habits. 

8 TIPS TO A HEALTHILY LIFE AT 90 

* Have a positive outlook.”I think the outlook we have is a big part of it. If I ever have any aches or pains I think ‘o well they’ll go away’, and they do.”

* Exercise regularly at any age. ”I exercise once a week at the Get Fit class held at my retirement village. Up until recently I had a mini trampoline in my bedroom and most mornings I’d get out of bed and jump on it to get the blood flowing.”

* Avoid alcohol. “I have never drunk spirits in my life and don’t really drink any other kind of alcohol, I have no desire for it. A lot of people I know drink alcohol at night and I don’t think that’s great for your health.”

* Don’t over-eat. “I stop eating when I feel full.” It’s the simplest way to maintain weight, she says. 

* Eat a healthy breakfast. “I have porridge every morning with a seed mix and turmeric sprinkled over top and i’ll have some fruit too.”

* Stay hydrated. “I drink a lot of water. There’s always a glass beside my bed.”

* Keep your brain active. Chappell enjoys Scrabble and looks forward to playing with her friend several times a week. She also plays Sudoku. 

* Take supplements where needed. “I take fish oil and calcium capsules daily and sometimes i’ll have a spoonful of molasses or cod liver oil if I’m feeling under the weather.”


 - Stuff

Next Teach Me story:

Smart kids more likely to smoke cannabis

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Article source: http://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/well-good/teach-me/89730977/a-95yearold-shares-eight-tips-for-good-health-in-old-age

Let’s not turn good health into an obsession

Every morning, I take vitamins with an enticing label that promises to boost longevity. My late husband, a frugal guy, purchased multiple jars during a sale — and then stashed them in the basement.

The irony certainly isn’t lost on me — because he downed these pills faithfully and exercised daily — and still succumbed to a fatal heart attack at 55.

We bought organically grown foods when we could afford them, leaned toward products with “natural” stamped on their packages — and researched substances that the internet gods promised would miraculously extend our life spans.

Red wine, green tea, dark chocolate and coconut oil top the list — and don’t forget blueberries, kale and garlic.

Still, my experience has shown me that, yes, good health is a fine goal — but don’t turn its pursuit into an obsession.

I mean, if you prefer milk over dark chocolate, don’t fret because you’re missing out on those mysterious antioxidants that lurk within cocoa beans.

And if — like me — you can’t bear the taste of kale, cross it off your shopping list — because life is too short to consider every meal a vitamin pill.

Admittedly, I take long walks and watch my weight — but ever since my husband’s death, I’ve embraced the obvious fact that nothing will fend off the Grim Reaper forever.

And frankly, I find it hilarious when some 100-year-old guy makes headlines — and then confesses he eats bacon and drinks whiskey everyday.

Despite our yearning to master things — weight control, birth control, mind control — we don’t determine our life span, nor the circumstances of our deaths.

We do, however, shape our attitudes and the ways we treat other people. And a beautiful song by Tim McGraw touts two traits for a good life — which aren’t diet and exercise.

“Go to church ‘cause your mamma says to; Visit grandpa every chance that you can; It won’t be wasted time; Always stay humble and kind.”

I’m not advocating smoking cigarettes, gobbling down doughnuts and refusing to leave our La-Z-Boy recliners — but so many people waste precious time on food fads and treadmill treks.

They fervently head to the gym, monitor calories with Fitbits — but somehow can’t show up for church on Sunday.

Truth be told, we can eat low-fat, sugar-free, vitamin-enriched meals, drink filtered water, run ourselves ragged in various marathons — and still die young.

As Jesus put it, “Keep watch, because you don’t know the day or the hour.” And he also asked, “Can any one of you by worrying add a single hour to your life?”

At some point, death sneaks in, like a thief in the night — and we can’t vanquish it with firm biceps and abs of steel.

I’ve never read an obituary about how religiously Mr. Jones went jogging and swam laps — or how Mrs. Smith fit into a size 2 after decades of dieting.

The best eulogies describe down-home folks who sacrificed for their families, prayed hard in church on Sunday and remained — in the words of that song — humble and kind.

They didn’t make headlines, nor did they take first prize in any sport — but as St. Paul said, they “fought the good fight … finished the race … and kept the faith.”

They also kept their sanity, because they acknowledged that, when it comes to life and death, God is at the helm.

Lorraine Murray has written a trilogy of fun-filled, church mysteries, most recently, “Death Dons a Mask.” Her email is lorrainevmurray@yahoo.com.


Article source: http://www.myajc.com/lifestyles/religion/let-not-turn-good-health-into-obsession/vJiv0hqCKNsSX02K2bdawO/

Trade Me in good health, analyst says

Trade Me is in sound financial health but its revenue and profit growth is affected by economic conditions in New Zealand, Morningstar analyst Gareth James says.

The company reports its financial results this morning.

Consequently, a slowdown or an economic downturn could cause a decline in activity across Trade Me’s key businesses.Trade Me’s brand image and credibility could be affected in the case of a breach of privacy or fraud, which could affect the confidence of its users, undermining revenue in the process.

“Trade Me is also at risk of failing to navigate and adapt to changes in online consumer habits and preferences. The company boasts a strong management team and the departure of key management personnel in quick succession would be detrimental.”

Trade Me had struggled with margin contraction in recent years, with earnings before interest and tax (ebit) margin contracting from 79% in the 2011 financial year to 56% in 2016, Mr James said in a research note.

The contraction was attributed to the maturity of the general items division, as well as to reinvestment of profits to address competitive pressures. However, capital expenditure requirements were likely to decline following a period of elevated investments, enabling margins to stabilise.

Revenue had grown at a compound annual growth rate (cagr) of 12% during the past five years and Morningstar was forecasting a cagr of 7% for the next five years, underpinned by growth in the classifieds business.

Signs of earnings improvement were evident in the 2016 financial result, with ebit growth improving from a 0.3% fall in the first half to 4.3% growth in the second half. Automotive classifieds were expected to be a key driver of growth in the 2017 financial year, he said.

“Trade Me’s balance sheet is in good shape thanks to the capital-light nature of the business model and we expect to stay that way.”

Net debt was only $102 million at June 30, 2016, with the net debt/operating profit ration “very manageable” at 0.7 times and expected to fall to 0.6 times by the end of the financial year.

Cash conversion (operating cash flow less capital expenditure/net profit after tax) usually exceeded 100% although the first half could be weak due to the seasonality of some payments, such as tax, Mr James said.

 

Market responses

THE BULLS SAY

Trade Me commands strong brand equity and its online marketplace business has a strong network effect.

• Increased online penetration, spurred on by faster internet speeds, will likely result in higher e-commerce activity and solid revenue momentum for Trade Me.

• A pristine balance sheet and excellent free cash flow will enable Trade Me to make generous distributions to shareholders.

THE BEARS SAY

• Price increases in property classifieds are proving difficult and several agents have migrated to a competing website, resulting in lower listings and audience share.

• A rapidly changing internet landscape may be disruptive to Trade Me’s business model. Increased competition from international firms such as Amazon, Google and Yahoo cannot be ruled out, given their large pool of highly engaged audiences.

• Trade Me’s margins in the near term could come under pressure as it seeks to invest in other business to drive revenue growth.

• Trade Me healthy but economy affects profit.

Article source: https://www.odt.co.nz/business/trade-me-good-health-analyst-says

Eight reasons why KISSING is so good for your health | Daily Mail …

Kissing can be many things: sweet, loving, intense, passionate.

But did you know it could also benefit your health? Kissing can also be a hormone releaser, a mini-workout and a mood relaxer.

Scientists have proven that smooching can trigger a whole spectrum of physiological processes to boost your immunity and improve your connection with your partner.

We take you through each one and explain just how beneficial a lip lock can be.

Scientists have proven that smooching can trigger a whole spectrum of physiological processes to boost your immunity and improve your connection with your partner

Scientists have proven that smooching can trigger a whole spectrum of physiological processes to boost your immunity and improve your connection with your partner

1. IT’S GOOD FOR YOUR TEETH

According to dentist Dr Heidi Hausauer, kissing increases saliva flow. This in turn keeps the mouth, teeth and gums healthy by removing food particles.

The extra saliva helps to wash bacteria off the teeth and reduce plaque buildup.

Some experts even claims that the mineral ions in saliva can promote repair of small lesions in tooth enamel.

2. GIVES IMMUNE SYSTEM A BOOST 

Just as saliva can help oral hygiene, it can also give your immune system a boost. 

There are more than 700 types of bacteria inside a human mouth – with no two alike. 

Therefore, exchanging saliva can introduce the body to new bacteria.

Studies have shown that having a diverse amount of bacteria in our bodies correlates with better health – specifically when it comes to our microbiota, or the collection of microorganisms living inside us.

A 2014 Dutch study found that a 10-second French kiss can exchange up to 80 million bacteria between us and our partner.

And while a single kiss isn’t enough to change a person’s microbiota, the researchers found that couples who kissed longer had similar microbiota, meaning that they would be better prepared to fight off similar infections and digest similar foods.

3. LOWERS ANXIETY

Kissing has been shown to decrease the stress hormone cortisol and increase serotonin – a chemical responsible for maintaining mood balance – levels in the brain. 

It has also been shown to have similar benefits to meditation, mainly from its ability to release oxytocin, also known as the ‘love’ hormone.

Oxytocin can act like a psychological buffer and induces a sense of calm and bonding in humans.

Experts say we experience a surge of the hormone during orgasm but kind words or a gentle touch can also drive oxytocin levels up. This enhances the experience of what we identify as love and trust.

4. LESSENS ALLERGIC REACTIONS 

Dr Hajime Kimata, who specializes in allergology at a clinic in Japan, won an Ig Nobel Prize for revealing how 30 minutes of kissing can reduce the effect of allergic reactions.

In 2006, his team studied 24 patients with two types of allergies: mild atopic eczema (a skin allergy) and mild allergic rhinitis (a nasal allergy). The patients were looked at before and after kissing their partners for 30 minutes while listening to soft music.

Specifically, they smooched along to Celine Dion’s My Heart Will Go On with the belief that the soft ballad would set a romantic mood.

The researchers found that kissing reduced the body’s production of IgE, which is the body’s way of reacting to an allergen. 

5. LOWERS BLOOD PRESSURE

Because our lips are made up of blood vessels, kissing can lower blood pressure by dilating them and therefore allowing blood to flow to the vital organs.

Plastic surgeon Dr Ryan Neinstein told Glamour: ‘The blood is then directed toward the face and away from the rest of the body so the demand on the heart goes down, resulting in lower blood pressure.’

As explained above, kissing lowers cortisol levels, which not only lowers anxiety, but also blood pressure.

6. DELAYS SIGNS OF AGING

Because kissing increases blood flow to the face, it stimulates the production of collagen – an abundant and important protein found in our bodies, according to Dr Neinstein. 

‘In order to move your lips, your whole face has to get involved, which increases elasticity,’ he said.

‘Have you seen face yoga, or facercises? There are yogis, estheticians and dermatologists training women to do exercises for their face to stimulate collagen and reduce the need for a face lift. 

‘Passionate kissing can lead to firming the face, especially the bottom half of the face.’

Kissing with tongue - which uses all the muscles in your face - can burn up to 26 calories per minute, experts say

Kissing with tongue – which uses all the muscles in your face – can burn up to 26 calories per minute, experts say

7. BURNS CALORIES

Depending on which study you look at, kissing can burn anywhere between two and six calories per minute. However, kissing with tongue – which uses all the muscles in your face – can burn up to 26 calories per minute.

Andréa Demirjian, author of Kissing: Everything You Ever Wanted to Know about One of Life’s Sweetest Pleasures, told CNN it wouldn’t compare to a workout session at the gym, but it would still do its job.

‘Kissing and lovemaking can be a vigorous exercise if you’re fully engaged.You need to have a passionate kiss [in order to burn those calories], but it doesn’t have to be a 10-hour makeout session,’ she said.

Researchers also say we use 30 muscles while kissing, which helps keep your cheeks tight.

8. INCREASES SEX DRIVE

Kissing prompts your brain to release a happy elixir of feel-good chemicals like serotonin, dopamine, and oxytocin. 

Additionally, testosterone – the hormone responsible for sex drive in both women and men – is released into saliva during prolonged kissing. 

‘Male saliva has trace amounts of testosterone – and testosterone is an aphrodisiac,’ Gallup says. ‘So passing saliva during open-mouth kissing over extended periods might help raise her testosterone levels and affect her sex drive,’ Dr Gordon Gallup, a psychologist at the University at Albany, told Men’s Health

Article source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-4242810/Eight-reasons-KISSING-good-health.html

Imagine if we all could catch good health – The Daily Tribune



Is it reasonable to consider a good thing as contagious? Isnt it widely accepted, for example, that laughter can be infectious?

What would be the beneficial implications of viewing health as catching?

For one thing, instead of viewing health as fragile, we could find a sturdier sense of health that is, health that is not just the absence of disease or infirmity, as pointed out by the World Health Organization.

This, in turn, could help us confront fear in the face of news reports of the flu and other forms of contagion. Such reports, in this newspaper and others, can help us be informed, alert and wise.

Unfortunately, they can also make us fearful.

Back when Dr. Margaret Chan, director-general of the WHO, was addressing the Ebola outbreak, she said fear was spreading faster than the virus. And early last year, discussing the Zika virus, she said, The level of alarm is extremely high.

Tackling fear is important.

Health reformer Mary Baker Eddy said, People believe in infectious and contagious diseases, and that any one is liable to have them under certain predisposing or exciting causes. This mental state prepares one to have any disease whenever there appear the circumstances which he believes produce it. If he believed as sincerely that health is catching when exposed to contact with healthy people, he would catch their state of feeling quite as surely and with better effect than he does the sick mans.

All of this makes me think of an example from the Bible in which Jesus touched a leper. Instead of Jesus catching leprosy, the leper was cured (KJV Matthew 8:2-3).

Could that touch have been an assertion of a different view of what health is and where it comes from an assertion that the source of health is superior to the source of disease?

There is a biblical basis for this idea: the Lord God omnipotent reigneth and I will restore health unto thee … saith the LORD. (Revelation 19:6, Jeremiah 30:17).

Several winters ago, when I took my car in for a repair, this higher view of health helped me out. After waiting there for about an hour and a half, when my car was ready and I went to the counter to pay for the repair, the receptionist said something like, You really dont want to be here; we pretty much all have the flu and several our staff members are out with it.

My first thought was, thats something you should probably tell me at the beginning instead of after Ive been here for over an hour. But just after that not-so-helpful thought, I remembered Eddys statement about viewing health as catching. And I said to the receptionist, Dont worry, you can all catch health from me. Perhaps understandably, she didnt quite know what to say to that, but it calmed my fears. And, over the ensuing days and weeks, I did not come down with the flu.

Wouldnt it be great if we read the newspaper tomorrow and see reports of widespread health?

Bob Cummings of Milford is an Oakland Press community blogger and spokesman for Christian Science in Michigan, writing about spirituality and health. See more at csinmichigan.com, follow him on Twitter @CSinMichigan, or email him at michigan@compub.org.

Article source: http://www.dailytribune.com/lifestyle/20170221/imagine-if-we-all-could-catch-good-health

Health apps could be doing more harm than good, warn scientists

Fitness trackers and mental health apps could be doing more harm than good because they are not based on sound science, researchers have warned, comparing some health app developers to “snake oil salesmen of the 1860s”.

Greg Hager, professor of computer science at Johns Hopkins University, said that in the absence of trials or scientific grounding it was impossible to say whether apps were having the intended effect.

“I am sure that these apps are causing problems,” he told the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting in Boston. Hager cited the one-size-fits-all targets provided by some fitness trackers, such as the Fitbit, which sets users a goal of taking 10,000 steps a day.

Hager claimed the 10,000 steps target dated back to a 1960s Japanese study that showed there were health benefits for men who burned at least 2,000 calories per week through exercise – roughly equivalent to 10,000 steps each day. An early pedometer was known as the manpo-kei, which means “10,000-step meter” in Japanese.

“But is that the right number for any of you in this room?” Hager asked. “Who knows. It’s just a number that’s now built into the apps.”

“We have an incredible number of apps in the wild basically being downloaded by people who may or may not understand what they are actually telling them or what the context for that is,” he said. “Until we have evidence-based apps you could amplify issues. I mean, imagine everyone thinks they have to do 10,000 steps but you are not actually physically capable of doing that, you could actually cause harm or damage by doing so.”

However, others suggested that the fears had been overblown.

Prof John Jakicic, of the University of Pittsburgh, whose team last year found that fitness trackers did not help people lose weight, said: “We need to be careful about relying solely on these devices. However, there is a place for these, and so we need to be careful not to throw the baby out with the bathwater, in my opinion.”

Simon Leigh, a health economist at the University of Liverpool, said that of far greater concern were health apps that made recommendations about medication, such as adjusting insulin dosage.

“These have the huge opportunity for error,” he said. “Exercise apps on the whole may result in a small number of incidents, but in general they are promoting healthy behaviours. So the opportunity for damage, although increased for some, such as diabetics who suddenly up their exercise, is likely to be minimal.”

Fitbit ambassador and former Olympian, Greg Whyte, said: “As 10,000 steps equates to around five to six miles, which will take around two hours, it is a daily target and not necessarily a single exercise session target.”

He added that over reliance on wearable tech could be a problem. “Remember, your tech works for you, not the other way around,” he said.

The Fitbit website states that the 10,000 target was designed to match the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) recommendation that adults should exercise for at least 150 minutes each week, and also notes that this target might not be suitable for those new to exercise.

The number of healthcare apps has soared in recent years, with more than 165,000 health-related apps available on the Apple store, including ones that offer to monitor blood pressure, calculate insulin doses for diabetics and encourage mindfulness exercises.

“Very few of them are science-based in the tradition of how we would think of doing science-based medicine,” said Hager.

Steve Flatt, director of the Psychological Therapies Unit in Liverpool, said that while some mental health apps were well researched and could offer benefits, the field as a whole was “in the equivalent stage of the 1860s wild west”

“Everyone sees a gravy train and are not hesitating to jump on board even if there is little of no evidence of utility, on the basis that there is a vast amount of money to be made,” he said. “This field is currently in its infancy and can be likened to the snake oil salesmen of the 1860s,” he added. “Originally, snake oil was an effective Chinese remedy for aching joints and inflammation. Then it was ripped off by unscrupulous fraudsters.”

Article source: https://www.theguardian.com/science/2017/feb/21/health-apps-could-be-doing-more-harm-than-good-warn-scientists

Dunsmuir girl found, said to be ‘in reasonably good health’

The Siskiyou County Sheriff’s Office reported Monday that missing 15 year old Victoria Lara was located Saturday and is expected to be reunited with her family soon.

She was found at a residence in the Orland area and transferred to the custody of Tehama County child welfare officials, according to a Sheriff’s Office news release.

Tehama County and Siskiyou County child welfare agencies are coordinating care for Lara, and her mother was notified of her safe recovery, the Sheriff’s Office reported.

Sheriff Jon Lopey states in the release, “We are tremendously relieved that Victoria was found safe and in reasonably good health. We are also grateful for the extraordinary support we received from the Chico Police Department, Tehama County Sheriff’s Office, the Orland Police Department, and Tehama and Siskiyou County child welfare agencies. We also received assistance and support from Victoria’s family, numerous news media outlets, and citizens in Chico and Orland. Virtually all federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies in the region were looking for Victoria and we appreciate that support. We anticipate that Victoria will be reunited with her family soon. Any teenager absent from their home for extended periods of time is endangered and many citizens do not realize many of these teenage runaways fall prey to human trafficking predators.”

Victoria had last been seen in the Dunsmuir area Feb. 9 and was seen Feb. 11 in the Chico area. She “appeared to have voluntarily left her home and due to a number of factors was considered ‘endangered’ by SCSO investigators,” according to the news release.

The Siskiyou County Sheriff’s Office reported that one of its Major Crimes’ Unit detectives was assigned on Saturday, Feb. 18, to coordinate a search for the missing teenager in the Chico area.

MCU detectives had been working closely with the Chico Police Department to locate the missing teenager after she was last seen in their jurisdiction, according to the release.

Siskiyou County Detective Jesus Fernandez was in the area when he received a report from the Orland Police Department that they located the missing teenager at a residence in the Orland area.

OPD said a citizen reported a sighting of the teenager and based their observations on recent news reports, according to the Sheriff’s Office. She had reportedly been staying at the Orland residence for about two days.

The Sheriff’s Office reported she was initially detained by OPD for law violations, and she initially failed to provide her true name. However, “OPD officers felt she matched the description of the recent SCSO ‘Endangered Missing Person’ bulletin and recent news media reports disseminated to local and regional media outlets.”

Detective Fernandez responded to Orland, and “with assistance from the Tehama County Sheriff’s Office and OPD, and Detective Fernandez’ confirmation, the teenager was positively identified and transferred to the custody of Tehama County child welfare officials,” the Sheriff’s Office states in its release.

Sheriff Lopey urges anyone with information about Victoria’s disappearance or her activities from Feb. 9 to 18 to contact the Siskiyou County Sheriff’s Office’s MCU at its 24-hour Dispatch Center, (530) 841-2900.

Article source: http://www.mtshastanews.com/article/20170220/NEWS/170229983

Pucker up! Eight reasons why KISSING is so good for your health – from burning calories to slowing aging

Kissing can be many things: sweet, loving, intense, passionate.

But did you know it could also benefit your health? Kissing can also be a hormone releaser, a mini-workout and a mood relaxer.

Scientists have proven that smooching can trigger a whole spectrum of physiological processes to boost your immunity and improve your connection with your partner.

We take you through each one and explain just how beneficial a lip lock can be.

Scientists have proven that smooching can trigger a whole spectrum of physiological processes to boost your immunity and improve your connection with your partner

Scientists have proven that smooching can trigger a whole spectrum of physiological processes to boost your immunity and improve your connection with your partner

1. IT’S GOOD FOR YOUR TEETH

According to dentist Dr Heidi Hausauer, kissing increases saliva flow. This in turn keeps the mouth, teeth and gums healthy by removing food particles.

The extra saliva helps to wash bacteria off the teeth and reduce plaque buildup.

Some experts even claims that the mineral ions in saliva can promote repair of small lesions in tooth enamel.

2. GIVES IMMUNE SYSTEM A BOOST 

Just as saliva can help oral hygiene, it can also give your immune system a boost. 

There are more than 700 types of bacteria inside a human mouth – with no two alike. 

Therefore, exchanging saliva can introduce the body to new bacteria.

Studies have shown that having a diverse amount of bacteria in our bodies correlates with better health – specifically when it comes to our microbiota, or the collection of microorganisms living inside us.

A 2014 Dutch study found that a 10-second French kiss can exchange up to 80 million bacteria between us and our partner.

And while a single kiss isn’t enough to change a person’s microbiota, the researchers found that couples who kissed longer had similar microbiota, meaning that they would be better prepared to fight off similar infections and digest similar foods.

3. LOWERS ANXIETY

Kissing has been shown to decrease the stress hormone cortisol and increase serotonin – a chemical responsible for maintaining mood balance – levels in the brain. 

It has also been shown to have similar benefits to meditation, mainly from its ability to release oxytocin, also known as the ‘love’ hormone.

Oxytocin can act like a psychological buffer and induces a sense of calm and bonding in humans.

Experts say we experience a surge of the hormone during orgasm but kind words or a gentle touch can also drive oxytocin levels up. This enhances the experience of what we identify as love and trust.

4. LESSENS ALLERGIC REACTIONS 

Dr Hajime Kimata, who specializes in allergology at a clinic in Japan, won an Ig Nobel Prize for revealing how 30 minutes of kissing can reduce the effect of allergic reactions.

In 2006, his team studied 24 patients with two types of allergies: mild atopic eczema (a skin allergy) and mild allergic rhinitis (a nasal allergy). The patients were looked at before and after kissing their partners for 30 minutes while listening to soft music.

Specifically, they smooched along to Celine Dion’s My Heart Will Go On with the belief that the soft ballad would set a romantic mood.

The researchers found that kissing reduced the body’s production of IgE, which is the body’s way of reacting to an allergen. 

5. LOWERS BLOOD PRESSURE

Because our lips are made up of blood vessels, kissing can lower blood pressure by dilating them and therefore allowing blood to flow to the vital organs.

Plastic surgeon Dr Ryan Neinstein told Glamour: ‘The blood is then directed toward the face and away from the rest of the body so the demand on the heart goes down, resulting in lower blood pressure.’

As explained above, kissing lowers cortisol levels, which not only lowers anxiety, but also blood pressure.

6. DELAYS SIGNS OF AGING

Because kissing increases blood flow to the face, it stimulates the production of collagen – an abundant and important protein found in our bodies, according to Dr Neinstein. 

‘In order to move your lips, your whole face has to get involved, which increases elasticity,’ he said.

‘Have you seen face yoga, or facercises? There are yogis, estheticians and dermatologists training women to do exercises for their face to stimulate collagen and reduce the need for a face lift. 

‘Passionate kissing can lead to firming the face, especially the bottom half of the face.’

Kissing with tongue - which uses all the muscles in your face - can burn up to 26 calories per minute, experts say

Kissing with tongue – which uses all the muscles in your face – can burn up to 26 calories per minute, experts say

7. BURNS CALORIES

Depending on which study you look at, kissing can burn anywhere between two and six calories per minute. However, kissing with tongue – which uses all the muscles in your face – can burn up to 26 calories per minute.

Andréa Demirjian, author of Kissing: Everything You Ever Wanted to Know about One of Life’s Sweetest Pleasures, told CNN it wouldn’t compare to a workout session at the gym, but it would still do its job.

‘Kissing and lovemaking can be a vigorous exercise if you’re fully engaged.You need to have a passionate kiss [in order to burn those calories], but it doesn’t have to be a 10-hour makeout session,’ she said.

Researchers also say we use 30 muscles while kissing, which helps keep your cheeks tight.

8. INCREASES SEX DRIVE

Kissing prompts your brain to release a happy elixir of feel-good chemicals like serotonin, dopamine, and oxytocin. 

Additionally, testosterone – the hormone responsible for sex drive in both women and men – is released into saliva during prolonged kissing. 

‘Male saliva has trace amounts of testosterone – and testosterone is an aphrodisiac,’ Gallup says. ‘So passing saliva during open-mouth kissing over extended periods might help raise her testosterone levels and affect her sex drive,’ Dr Gordon Gallup, a psychologist at the University at Albany, told Men’s Health

Article source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-4242810/Eight-reasons-KISSING-good-health.html

Promoting fitness and good health in a fun way

ZANESVILLE, Ohio – To promote good health and wellness, Genesis held their yearly ‘Day of Dance’ event.

Women were invited out to Eagle Sticks for dance lessons, health screenings, a Q and A with a panel of doctors, and spa treatments. Kelley Daspit, the Director of Marketing and Public Relations for the hospital, said it’s a better way to learn about healthy living than being lecture at.

“We always have something fun. Instead of just listening to someone speak, we put our words into action and that’s why we are dancing and having spa treatments and have a fun time today,” said Daspit.

This was our tenth year that the hospital has hosted the event. Dr. Samar Khoury was one of the cardiologists in the panel and said that living a healthier lifestyle doesn’t necessary mean doing away with some of your favorite things.

“We try to tell them to exercise, to try to watch what they eat. I don’t think it is reasonable to tell people to avoid something 100%, but to be modest. Have a balance diet and lots greens, low fat, low carbs, doesn’t mean that you eliminate carbs and fats,” said Dr. Khoury.

The next big event Genesis will be having is their ‘Girls Night Out’ on April 20.

Article source: https://www.whiznews.com/2017/02/promoting-fitness-good-health-fun-way/

Sowing seeds to good health with herb garden

Tucked in a corner of the Lim Chu Kang wilderness are plots of unremarkable-looking plants with evocative names: Sabah snake grass, black-faced general, cat’s whiskers and sky-full-of-stars.

This is Mr Chew Lai Hock’s garden of medicinal herbs, which he believes can be used to treat ailments ranging from diabetes to kidney stones and even cancer. While many of these treatments are unproven by science, he is a believer.

“I am not a Chinese doctor, but I have done my research on these plants,” the 61-year-old said.

“You don’t have to believe me, but I have seen that they work.”

Mr Chew, who has worked as a carpenter all his life, first became interested in these herbs a decade ago, when he began taking tablets marketed as an all-natural health supplement. He learnt that a key ingredient was Sabah snake grass – a tropical plant formally known as Clinacanthus nutans – and obtained some to grow on his own.

That was the start of a journey that has seen him sourcing for medicinal plants from places such as Malaysia and Taiwan to cultivate in his Lim Chu Kang garden over the past five years.

They include black-faced general, a shrub with shiny dark green leaves officially called Strobilanthes crispus, and cat’s whiskers, the Chinese name of a flowering plant known as Orthosiphon aristatus.

Black-faced general is typically used to treat colon cancer, while cat’s whiskers is used by some traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) practitioners to help people get rid of kidney stones.

Mr Chew grows and sells more than 10 types of medicinal plants in his small garden, which belongs to the owner of a landscaping company in the area. The man, whom he met at a temple, told Mr Chew that he could use the land rent-free because the plants he was growing would help sick people.

“When I first started out, he told me that I could have the land for free since the whole area was full of weeds anyway,” Mr Chew recalled.

“Now, I just pay him $300 a year for water and electricity costs.”

Although the exact health benefits of these herbs have not yet been scientifically proven, Mr Chew said that his customer base has been growing steadily over the years.

“Both old and young people are buying them, to treat illnesses and as a way of staying healthy,” said Mr Chew, who earns between $1,000 and $2,000 a month by selling his produce. His bestseller is Sabah snake grass, the popularity of which can be traced back to 2008, when a Malaysian man claimed that the plant had cured his thyroid cancer.

Mr Chew sells 1kg of fresh leaves and stems for $20, or packets of assorted herbs, which can be brewed like tea, for $19.

TCM physician Gee Swee Sien, who is from Thomson Chinese Medicine, said research has shown that Sabah snake grass contains anti-tumour elements. “Though it has gained popularity in recent years, the mechanism as to how it prevents or cures cancer is still unknown. More research is needed to validate these medicinal claims.”

Mr Chew, who takes the herbal concoction himself, has no such reservations. “I used to have a lot of problems but since taking this, I haven’t needed to see a doctor in five years,” the father of three said. “When my children fall sick, I tell them that it’s there, and you can take it whenever you want.”

Article source: http://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/sowing-seeds-to-good-health-with-herb-garden