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Travel medicine health tips

The world is becoming more globalised, with the number of people traveling each year on the rise. US residents are taking nearly two billion leisure trips and almost 500 million business trips (2016), with UK residents making 70.8 million visits overseas last year (2016), an 8% increase to the previous year (2015).

With travel visits increasing year on year on a worldwide scale, it is no wonder travel medicine is an area also growing quickly to match activity and demand.

So, what are some of best and useful travel health tips for those traveling?

We asked a number of experts committed to the promotion of healthy and safe travel, from physicians, nurses, and pharmacists, to public health officials at The 15th Conference of the International Society of Travel Medicine (CISTM15) this year, what their top travel health tips were.

Featured image credit: Ocean by Clem Onojeghuo. CC0 public domain via UnSplash.

Article source: https://blog.oup.com/2017/07/travel-medicine-health-tips/

Shirtless ‘Outlander’ Star Sam Heughan Shares Workout Tips With ‘Men’s Health South Africa’

5 hours ago

Fans of “Outlander” are not unaccustomed to seeing Sam Heughan’s shirtless physique in his passionate love scenes with co-star Caitriona Balfe, and now he’s demonstrating the kind of work he puts into maintaining that physique, courtesy of a short video for the South African edition of Men’s Health.

In a video the magazine shared on its Instagram page, the 37-year-old can be seen pumping iron and working out with a heavy kettle bell, sans shirt, as he demonstrates the kind of extreme effort he puts into staying ripped for those “Outlander” boudoir scenes.

RELATED: Sam Heughan Shirtless In South Africa For My Peak Challenge

“Our cover guy @samheughan shares the training plan that got him in TOP shape for his role in @outlander_starz – and chats about his awesome philanthropy work with @mypeakchallenge,” notes the caption accompanying the video.”

Apparently there’s more to come, with the mag’s Instagram post also telling fans to “keep an eye on our Facebook page later this week for a BRUTAL workout video series we shot with Sam and his trainer.” Watch:

ON SALE TOMORROW! August issue coming in HOT

Article source: http://etcanada.com/news/242861/shirtless-outlander-star-sam-heughan-shares-workout-tips-with-mens-health-south-africa/

Watertown Daily Times | Carthage hospital offers tips at health fair

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CARTHAGE — Molly Kell tries to take care of herself. The 59-year-old Carthage resident watches what she eats, exercises, belongs to a Facebook support group and regularly drinks a protein drink.

And she attended a community health fair, sponsored by Carthage Area Hospital, on Saturday.

She went to the event at Carthage Park to learn about the programs the hospital offers to help keep people healthy.

“Strong is the new sexy, baby,” she said.

She and her mother, Ruth Christman, 83, also of Carthage, joined dozens of people who stopped at a series of tables set up in a park pavilion that offered information about such subjects as behavioral health, dental sealants, nutrition and women’s health.

Ms. Christman suffers from diabetes, high blood pressure and a thyroid problem.

“At our age, you’re going to have health problems,” she joked.

But the third annual health fair, called “Passport to Health,” will help her take better care of herself, she said.

Taylour Scanlin, the hospital’s marketing director, said the first “Passport to Health” was held on June 20, 2015, the same date that Carthage Area Hospital celebrated its 50th anniversary.

During Saturday’s event, dietician Susie Kim talked about healthy portions that people should eat. She also brought with her replicas of what body fat and muscle feel like. She also gave out apples.

“An apple a day keeps the doctor away,” she said.

Dental hygienist Donna M. Farney, who travels to seven area schools to teach second- and third-graders about dental sealants, gave away toothbrushes, toothpaste and flossing material.

The hospital recently received a five-year grant extension to continue the dental program, which offers the service to children for free through the state Department of health. Dental sealants — plastic molds placed on the surface of back teeth — help prevent cavities.

“They are the best thing to fight cavities,” she said.

Cancer survivor Penny Ellis stopped by because she wanted to acknowledge all the good work that the hospital offers. Cancer free for six years, she hoped to use the information she learned to help her make decisions about what she eats and exercising.

“I want to make sure the hospital stays in our community,” she said.

After stopping at each of the tables at the health fair, attendees received a sticker to show that they had their passports filled out from the various stations and then given a special gift. They also were provided a cookout of hot dogs, hamburgers and macaroni and potato salads.

Article source: http://www.watertowndailytimes.com/news03/carthage-hospital-offers-tips-at-health-fair-20170722

4 nutrition tips to honor your health without dieting

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Nutrition can feel very confusing and overwhelming. It seems that everyone has an opinion and claims absolute truth with their eating style or diet plan.

Add to that possible health concerns, needing to accommodate many different appetites within a family and the societal pressures on body image, and it’s easy to choose one of two things: throw your hands up in despair or go on a diet.

That all-or-nothing attitude (not the food) is really your worst enemy when it comes to eating. That’s why I like to help people live more in the gray, something that feels more moderate and flexible while also taking responsibility for their health and well-being. Here are four tips for how you can honor your health without it feeling overwhelming, obsessive or preoccupying.

Balanced Meals

Diet culture would teach you to cut out foods or food groups, which only results in unsatisfying meals. This is particularly true for carbohydrates and fats — two food groups often villainized. However, including carbs and fats, along with protein and a fruit and/or vegetable will help to stabilize blood sugar levels, reduce cravings and prevent you from getting overly hungry. Balanced meals will give you the sustainable energy you need to push away from the table to live your life for a few hours without needing to think about food.

This means an omelet at breakfast will feel more satisfying with a piece of toast with avocado or butter. Your sandwich at lunch will keep you full longer if you use bread instead of a lettuce wrap, adding a fruit or a vegetable as a side instead. Adding rice or a potato to your chicken and vegetables at dinner will likely result in less nighttime snacking than if you had gone without them.

It’s easy in the nutrition culture we live in to equate healthy eating with restrictive eating, but I definitely maintain that healthy eating is actually flexible eating and inclusive of a wide variety of foods. When your eating patterns have variety and are flexible, you’re less likely to behave in chaotic ways around food. Feeling full and satisfied from your meals and snacks is your solution. Not feeling full and satisfied is what leads to problematic behaviors.

Listen to Hunger/Fullness Cues

We are all born with tools to self-moderate food choices. This is largely done by listening to the way our body communicates its needs to us through hunger and fullness signals. Too often we get too busy to listen or we quit listening because we listen to some sort of external indicator instead like a clock, a diet, food rules or even a well-meaning caretaker that tells us when to eat or stop eating.

However, even if you have ignored those signals, they never actually leave you. With practice, you can redevelop the ability to hear and respond to hunger and fullness cues. I would recommend being intentional about doing that, by actually recording your level of hunger before eating and your level of fullness after eating. You may find that you are actually really good at knowing when and how much to eat as you gain practice with listening to, respecting and responding to hunger and fullness cues. Here is a hunger scale to help — try to stay in the green zone most of the time.

Eat Regularly

Hunger and fullness cues could feel unreliable at first, especially if eating habits have been haphazard or chaotic. You should be intentional about checking in on your level of hunger every three to four hours. On occasion, you could probably go five hours, beware of getting overly hungry, which leaves you less than level-headed about food choices.

It’s important to be proactive in meeting your needs, especially as you are learning new ways to behave around food. Getting overly hungry could lead to chaotic eating, which would only reinforce the belief that you can’t self-moderate without rules. Keeping a somewhat regular pattern of eating each day will create more positive experiences with food where you are more likely to feel confident in your ability to meet your needs. Essentially, you’re avoiding becoming reactive with food by being more proactive.

Meal Plan

Lastly, I would recommend having a plan for meals throughout the week. It doesn’t need to require a lot of prep work or hours in the kitchen, but I do think it’s wise to plan ahead. What most people are looking for in a diet is a plan, structure and more predictability, which we can reproduce without the diet. Everyone’s meal planning techniques are different and you can work with a registered dietitian to ensure your meals and snacks are balanced, adequate and realistic for you.

Article source: http://www.connectstatesboro.com/news/article/12930/

Watertown Daily Times | Carthage hospital offers tips at health fair

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CARTHAGE — Molly Kell tries to take care of herself. The 59-year-old Carthage resident watches what she eats, exercises, belongs to a Facebook support group and regularly drinks a protein drink.

And she attended a community health fair, sponsored by Carthage Area Hospital, on Saturday.

She went to the event at Carthage Park to learn about the programs the hospital offers to help keep people healthy.

“Strong is the new sexy, baby,” she said.

She and her mother, Ruth Christman, 83, also of Carthage, joined dozens of people who stopped at a series of tables set up in a park pavilion that offered information about such subjects as behavioral health, dental sealants, nutrition and women’s health.

Ms. Christman suffers from diabetes, high blood pressure and a thyroid problem.

“At our age, you’re going to have health problems,” she joked.

But the third annual health fair, called “Passport to Health,” will help her take better care of herself, she said.

Taylour Scanlin, the hospital’s marketing director, said the first “Passport to Health” was held on June 20, 2015, the same date that Carthage Area Hospital celebrated its 50th anniversary.

During Saturday’s event, dietician Susie Kim talked about healthy portions that people should eat. She also brought with her replicas of what body fat and muscle feel like. She also gave out apples.

“An apple a day keeps the doctor away,” she said.

Dental hygienist Donna M. Farney, who travels to seven area schools to teach second- and third-graders about dental sealants, gave away toothbrushes, toothpaste and flossing material.

The hospital recently received a five-year grant extension to continue the dental program, which offers the service to children for free through the state Department of health. Dental sealants — plastic molds placed on the surface of back teeth — help prevent cavities.

“They are the best thing to fight cavities,” she said.

Cancer survivor Penny Ellis stopped by because she wanted to acknowledge all the good work that the hospital offers. Cancer free for six years, she hoped to use the information she learned to help her make decisions about what she eats and exercising.

“I want to make sure the hospital stays in our community,” she said.

After stopping at each of the tables at the health fair, attendees received a sticker to show that they had their passports filled out from the various stations and then given a special gift. They also were provided a cookout of hot dogs, hamburgers and macaroni and potato salads.

Article source: http://www.watertowndailytimes.com/news03/carthage-hospital-offers-tips-at-health-fair-20170722

Vernon County Health Department offers tips to cope with floods …

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Email notifications are only sent once a day, and only if there are new matching items.

Article source: http://lacrossetribune.com/vernonbroadcaster/news/local/vernon-county-health-department-offers-tips-to-cope-with-floods/article_9d11b153-dbcd-5280-86c3-a30b3665effd.html

HHS issues tips to protect health in extreme heat – News – The Miami …

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) reminds local residents about steps they should take to protect their health from the extreme heat.

EASTERN OKLAHOMA – Following the heat advisory and excessive heat warning issued by the National Weather Service for a large portion of eastern Oklahoma, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) reminds local residents about steps they should take to protect their health from the extreme heat.

People suffering from heat stress may experience heavy sweating; weakness; cold, pale, and clammy skin; fast, weak pulse; and nausea or vomiting. Early signs include muscle cramps, heat rash, fainting or near-fainting spells, and a pulse or heart rate greater than 100.

People suffering from heat stress should be moved to a cooler location to lie down. Apply cool, wet cloths to the body especially to head, neck, arm pits and upper legs near the groin area where combined 70 percent of body heat can be lost; and have the person sip water. They should remain in the cool location until recovered with a pulse heart rate well under 100 beats per minute.

Signs of the most severe heat-related illness, heat stroke, include a body temperature above 103 degrees Fahrenheit; hot, red, dry or moist skin; rapid and strong pulse; and altered mental status which can range from confusion and agitation to unconsciousness. Call 911 immediately and take steps to cool the person.

While children are especially vulnerable to heat illnesses, they may be unable to explain what is wrong but may act differently than usual. In extreme heat, consider changes in a child’s behavior to be heat stress.

Similarly, people with communication-related disabilities may have difficulty expressing a heat-related problem. In extreme heat, look for a change in behavior as a sign of heat stress.

Older adults face additional risk of heat stress and heat stroke, for a variety of reasons. A National Institute on Aging fact sheet advises that each year, most people who die from hyperthermia are over 50 years old. Health problems that put you at greater risk include:

Heart or blood vessel problems
Poorly working sweat glands or changes in your skin caused by normal aging
Heart, lung, or kidney disease, as well as any illness that makes you feel weak all over or results in a fever
Conditions treated by drugs, such as diuretics, sedatives, tranquilizers, and some heart and high blood pressure medicines; may make it harder for your body to cool itself
Taking several prescription drugs; ask your doctor if any of your medications make you more likely to become overheated.
Being very overweight or underweight
Drinking alcoholic beverages

To help prevent heat-related illness:

Spend time in locations with air-conditioning when possible.
Drink plenty of fluids. Good choices are water and diluted sport electrolyte drinks (1 part sport drink to 2 parts water) unless told otherwise by a doctor.
Choose lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothing
Limit outdoor activity to morning and evening hours

As air conditioning use increases, electrical grids can become overwhelmed causing power outages. In power outages, people who rely on electricity-dependent medical devices, like oxygen concentrators, may need assistance so check on family members, friends, and neighbors who use this type of equipment.

Community organizations and businesses can help local emergency managers and health departments plan for the community’s health needs amid the summer heat – and other emergency situations that cause power outages – using the HHS emPOWER Map. The HHS emPOWER Map provides the monthly total number of Medicare beneficiaries’ claims for electricity-dependent equipment at the national, state, territory, county, and zip code levels.

For more information about how to prevent heat-related illnesses visit the HHS public health emergency preparedness website at http://emergency.cdc.gov/disasters/extremeheat/.

Article source: http://www.miamiok.com/news/20170722/hhs-issues-tips-to-protect-health-in-extreme-heat

Carthage hospital offers tips at health fair

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CARTHAGE — Molly Kell tries to take care of herself. The 59-year-old Carthage resident watches what she eats, exercises, belongs to a Facebook support group and regularly drinks a protein drink.

And she attended a community health fair, sponsored by Carthage Area Hospital, on Saturday.

She went to the event at Carthage Park to learn about the programs that the hospital offers to help keep people healthy.

“Strong is the new sexy, baby,” she said.

She and her mother, Ruth Christman, 83, also of Carthage, joined dozens of people who stopped at a series of tables set up in a park pavilion that offered information about such subjects as behavioral health, dental sealants, nutrition and women’s health.

Ms. Christman suffers from diabetes, high blood pressure and a thyroid problem.

“At our age, you’re going to have health problems,” she joked.

But the third annual health fair, called “Passport to Health,” will help her take better care of herself, she said.

Taylour Scanlin, the hospital’s marketing director, said the first “Passport to Health” was held on June 20, 2015, the same date that Carthage Area Hospital celebrated its 50th anniversary.

During Saturday’s event, dietician Susie Kim talked about healthy portions that people should eat. She also brought with her replicas of what body fat and muscle feel like. She also gave out apples.

“An apple a day keeps the doctor away,” she said.

Dental hygienist Donna M. Farney, who travels to seven area schools to teach second- and third-graders about dental sealants, gave away toothbrushes, toothpaste and flossing material.

The hospital recently received a five-year grant extension to continue the dental program, which offers the service to children for free through the state Department of health. Dental sealants — plastic molds placed on the surface of back teeth — help prevent cavities.

“They are the best thing to fight cavities,” she said.

Cancer survivor Penny Ellis stopped by because she wanted to acknowledge all the good work that the hospital offers. Cancer free for six years, she hoped to use the information she learned to help her make decisions about what she eats and exercising.

“I want to make sure the hospital stays in our community,” she said.

After stopping at each of the tables at the health fair, attendees received a sticker to show that they had their passports filled out from the various stations and then given a special gift.

They also were provided a cookout of hot dogs, hamburgers, and macaroni and potato salads.

Article source: http://www.watertowndailytimes.com/news03/carthage-hospital-offers-tips-at-health-fair-20170722

Tips on staying safe when you’re hiking in Maine

Appalachian Trail in Maine

Source: Maine Appalachian Mountain Club/Tony Barrett

I was reading an article on the Appalachian Trail Conservancy website about how overall trail usage is on the rise when I noticed there’s been an increase in flip floppers. My intent with this blog post is to pass along some hiking safety tips, so the term flip floppers caught my eye right away. I was thinking who on Earth would wear flip flops when they were hiking the Appalachian Trail or any hiking trail for that matter?

But the article wasn’t talking about the kind of flip flops that popped into my head. Pardon my ignorance!  Flip flopping on the Appalachian Trail means using alternate or non-traditional thru-hiking trails to avoid crowds of hikers during the busiest times of the year. The Conservancy has been promoting the practice and in 2016 the number of flip-flop thru-hikers increased 22 percent compared to 2015. The number of people who hike sections of the trail also increased — 26 percent. The Trek also has some interesting stats about hiking the Appalachian Trail.

The Appalachian Trail is considered “the longest hiking-only footpath in the world.” It’s 2100 miles long and stretches from Springer Mountain in northern Georgia to Mount Katahdin in central Maine. The Maine section is widely regarded as one of, if not the most, difficult stretches of the trail.

Peter Roderick at Baxter State Park on the summit of The Owl peak

Hiking in Baxter State Park on the summit of The Owl peak

Peter Roderick is an avid hiker and a member of the Maine Appalachian Trail Club. No matter what trail he’s on, when he’s hiking, he’s in his element. He loves the woods, but he really loves being in the mountains. “I guess there’s more of a challenge there and more of a sense of accomplishment,” he told me. It’s one no matter what you do, but you just feel a little more of an accomplishment when you summit a mountain.”

When I asked him for some safety tips for hikers he said “The first thing I would think about is footwear. You can go up to Baxter and watch people climbing Katahdin in some pretty amazing outfits. One example: Flip flops.”  (Can you believe it? People actually do try to hike in flip flops!)

Next on Peter’s list is proper clothing. “We have a saying in the hiking world,” he explained. “Cotton kills. If you wear cotton and it gets wet, either through rain or perspiration, it’s not going to dry out until you get home and long after probably. Cotton just doesn’t dry quickly whereas synthetic fabrics do because they have a wicking capacity.”

Third: “Hydration. Carry enough water or whatever you like to drink [not alcohol] to get you up and down.”

Another piece of advice from Peter is to plan ahead. “Some people say oh, let’s go hiking,” he said. “I’m dressed the way I’m dressed and I’m wearing what I’m wearing and I’ll be fine. Oftentimes, there are no adverse consequences to that, but when there are, that’s when we hikers shake our heads and ask what were they thinking, anyway?”

Hiking safety tips

Here’s a list of things you should be thinking about if you’re going out on a short or a day hike.

  • Wear proper footwear (not flip flops).
  • Wear proper clothing (no cotton).
  • Consider dressing in layers in case the weather changes. Pack a rain jacket.
  • Bring plenty of water or sports drinks.
  • Don’t hike alone.
  • Know where you’re going and let someone else know.
  • Bring a lighter or matches.
  • Bring a flashlight and extra batteries if you’ll be out after dark.
  • Bring a multi purpose knife (my husband always carries his Leatherman).
  • Bring a simple first aid kit. Don’t forget sunscreen and insect repellent.
  • Pack some healthy snacks.
  • Don’t overreach. Know your limits.
  • Bring a waterproof trail map and/or a compass (know how to use the compass).

If you’re really into hiking or want to give it a try or you simply enjoy the outdoors in Maine, you should think about joining 1000+ hikers who’ll be gathering in Waterville August 4-11. The Maine Appalachian Trail Club is co-hosting the national Appalachian Trail Conservancy Conference at Colby College. There’ll be a week full of workshops, guided hikes, guest speakers and celebration of all things wonderful about the Appalachian Trail. Online registration has closed but you can just show up and register at the event. Click here for more information.

Peter is managing all 240+ hikes that are being offered at the conference. “Everything from very gentle walks within a couple miles from the Colby campus to pretty challenging sections of the Appalachian trail and everything in between.”

Can’t make it to the conference, but you’re itching to take a hike? The Maine Appalachian Trail Club has a long list of hiking and camping resources. I also found some other resources for tracking down awesome places to hike throughout the state.

Maine Trailfinder: A free online resource for people-powered four-season trails in the state of Maine.

Act Out With Aislinn: Blogger Aislinn Sarnacki is the queen of one-minute hikes in Maine.

Maine Mountain Guide: Carey Kish, who writes the blog Maniac Outdoors (among other things), is busily working on the next edition.

Hiker Carey Kish on Mount Katahdin, the northern end of the Appalachian Trail

Hiking Mount Katahdin, the northern end of the Appalachian Trail

Carey has hiked the entire Appalachian Trail twice. I’m going to let him have the last word on the joys and benefits of hiking in Maine.

“Maine has thousands of miles of trails with hikes to suit every interest and ability, from easy woodland and beach strolls to moderate hill climbs to rugged mountain rambles, along the scenic salty coastline to the spruce-scented North Woods. Invite friends and family, grab a pack and a trail lunch, lace up your boots, and go! There’s nothing like a day outside on Maine’s trails for some beautiful views, good fun and healthful exercise.”

Just don’t do anything foolish and don’t wear flip flops.

Do you have favorite hiking spot in Maine? Share it with us. Better yet, share a picture on the Catching Health Facebook page.

Article source: http://catchinghealth.bangordailynews.com/2017/07/21/fitness/hiking-safety-maine/

Tips to protect health in extreme heat – York Dispatch

The U.S. Department of Health Human Services issued the following advisory Thursday:

Following the heat advisory issued by the National Weather Service for your local area, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) reminds local residents about steps they should take to protect their health from the extreme heat.

People suffering from heat stress may experience heavy sweating; weakness; cold, pale, and clammy skin; fast, weak pulse; and nausea or vomiting. Early signs include muscle cramps, heat rash, fainting or near-fainting spells, and a pulse or heart rate greater than 100.

More: Heat advisory issued for York County

People suffering from heat stress should be moved to a cooler location to lie down. Apply cool, wet cloths to the body especially to head, neck, arm pits and upper legs near the groin area where combined 70 percent of body heat can be lost; and have the person sip water. They should remain in the cool location until recovered with a pulse heart rate is well under 100 beats per minute.

Signs of the most severe heat-related illness, heat stroke, include a body temperature above 103 degrees Fahrenheit; hot, red, dry or moist skin; rapid and strong pulse; and altered mental status which can range from confusion and agitation to unconsciousness. Call 911 immediately and take steps to cool the person.


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Friday, June 9, 2017--The Penn Park Splash Pad openedAmir Medina, 9, of York City, jumps over a fountainJudy Torres, 3, empties a water pistol on Jacob Delgado,Rocky Williams, 8, of York City, reacts to a splashFriday, June 9, 2017--The Penn Park Splash Pad openedJunior Williams, 6, of York City, reacts to a splashAmir Medina, 9, left, and Junior Williams, 6, bothTianna Williams, 11, of York City, gets a splash atNana Williams, 8, of York City, gets dripping wet atFriday, June 9, 2017--The Penn Park Splash Pad opened

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Red Lion councilman, borough at odds over splash pad operations

Older adults face additional risk of heat stress and heat stroke, for a variety of reasons. The National Institute on Aging’s fact sheet explains more about how extreme heat can affect seniors.

To help prevent heat-related illness:

  • Spend time in locations with air-conditioning when possible.
  • Drink plenty of fluids. Good choices are water and diluted sport electrolyte drinks (1 part sport drink to 2 parts water) unless told otherwise by a doctor.
  • Choose lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothing
  •  Limit outdoor activity to morning and evening hours

As air conditioning use increases, electrical grids can become overwhelmed causing power outages. In power outages, people who rely on electricity-dependent medical devices, like oxygen concentrators, may need assistance so check on family members, friends and neighbors who use this type of equipment.

Community organizations and businesses can help local emergency managers and health departments plan for the community’s health needs amid the summer heat – and other emergency situations that cause power outages – using the HHS emPOWER Map. The HHS emPOWER Map provides the monthly total number of Medicare beneficiaries’ claims for electricity-dependent equipment at the national, state, territory, county, and zip code levels.

For more information about how to prevent heat-related illnesses visit the HHS public health emergency preparedness website at http://emergency.cdc.gov/disasters/extremeheat/. For information about how to better prepare for disasters and other emergencies, visit www.ready.gov.

HHS’ mission is to enhance and protect the health and well-being of all Americans and fulfills its mission by providing for effective health and human services and fostering advances in medicine, public health, and social services. ASPR leads HHS in preparing the nation to respond to and recover from adverse health effects of emergencies, supporting communities’ ability to withstand adversity, strengthening health and response systems, and enhancing national health security.

Article source: http://www.yorkdispatch.com/story/news/health/2017/07/20/tips-protect-health-extreme-heat/496173001/