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EXCLUSIVE: ‘Toilet Talk’ and Healthy Living with Wendy Williams

There isn’t much that Wendy Williams won’t discuss. The legendary television host and former radio personality is no stranger to controversy. On her syndicated live daytime talk show, The Wendy Williams Show, she welcomes guests with open arms, urging them to display their shoes on her shoe cam before diving head first, tea cup in hand, into the nit and grit of their lives.

Williams has been in the game since the late ’80s, so the grind of the entertainment business has become ingrained into who she is. Still, her poignant quips and jaw-dropping opinions aren’t the only hot topics Williams has a handle on. She also refuses to shy away from what goes down in the bathroom.

Her Toilet Talk campaign, in partnership with the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) and Allergan and Ironwood Pharmaceuticals, is about…bowel movements.

“I don’t shy away from talking about taboo topics, and talking about number two, isn’t any different,” Williams said. Recently, we sat down with the talk show host to discuss Toilet Talk, her plant-based lifestyle and her Hunter Foundation.

EBONY.com: When we think about health in general, we don’t often consider colon health or what goes on in the restroom. Why was it important for you to join the Toilet Talk campaign and open up a dialogue about this?

Wendy Williams: I’ve never been shy to talk about anything. Colon cancer runs in my family so when I turned 50 three years ago, I went for my first colonoscopy. Also, it’s very important for me to go to the bathroom, turn around and inspect before flushing. Not enough people do that. There are over 60 million Americans affected by Irritable Bowel Syndrome. I’ve never been one of them, but oh god can you imagine?!

EBONY.com: It sounds horrible.

WW: There are three different types. There’s Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) with constipation, IBS with diarrhea, and then there’s chronic idiopathic constipation, which we don’t really know what the cause is.

EBONY.com: Are there other tips and tricks that people should know about when it comes to their colon health?

WW: I’ve got two great websites that they can check out, TheToiletTalk.com and AboutYourGut.com. That looking thing is also really important. Don’t just go, wipe, and flush. Go and then turn around and look at it. What does it look like? If you’re having a problem, consult your medical professional.

EBONY.com: You’re an extremely busy woman, but you’ve really focused on living a healthy lifestyle. So many people, especially Black women don’t take the time to take care of themselves. Why is living a healthy lifestyle so important to you?

WW: Well, it’s worked really well for me because my husband, son and I all eat the same. I’m a pescatarian. I eat an occasional piece of fish. But besides that, no meat, no meat, no meat. Our son is a total plant-based diet person. He’s on beans and rice and stuff like that; my husband goes between the two. It’s really easy for me because I’m surrounded by people who also eat clean like me. Why is it important? Because I want to live on the other side of 50. I’ve got another 50 years, but I want them to be good. I don’t eat collard greens with ham hocks anymore. I don’t even eat collard greens with turkey wings, but I like collard greens and hot sauce. If you have that collard green cabbage mix and then put some hot sauce on it with some nice seasoning— seasoning is important. There are so many great brands that make good plant-based meat. There are mushrooms that taste like oysters; there are mushrooms that taste like chicken. It’s been two years since me and my family have been eating this way, and I have to say … that um … I go regularly.

EBONY.com: Along with health, you’ve also focused on the Hunter Foundation. What inspired that partnership and what have you learned about yourself from the girls who’ve benefited from the foundation?

WW: Since joining the Hunter Foundation, it really has smacked home. I’ve already thought about my next life being philanthropy. I just never dreamed that I’d have my own foundation. This is like a dream come true. We try to help people. So far the most impacted have been the girls that we send away to summer camp. A foundation is a very difficult thing to start up. Once you get it up and running, the world is your oyster, you know? I think the first summer, years ago, there were maybe eight [girls]. This summer we’re sending 40 girls to a camp. The one with the mosquitoes that don’t have viruses. We’re sending to the good camp [Laughs].

EBONY.com: Why did you want to provide a camp experience?

WW: I went to camp during the summer. As a young person, I think camp is so important. You stay away from your home. That prepares you for those four years of college, so you’re not a scaredy cat and want to live in your bedroom. I went every summer since I was like three years old. Literally. Eventually, I would like to have a community center, and I would like to have after school help for young people, who need help with their homework and qualified people that I could hire to help them with their homework. I would like to help men and women get back into the workforce. Everybody screws up at some point in life, but everybody deserves a second chance. I grew up in a house of service. My parents still to this day, that’s what they do — they do service.

Article source: http://www.ebony.com/life/exclusive-wendy-williams-on-her-toilet-talk-campaign-plant-based-lifestyle-hunter-foundation

Educating children on healthy living

The “Alex’s Buddy Clinic” tent allows children to bring a stuffed animal or doll to the clinic so their pal can have a checkup. 

Article source: http://bismarcktribune.com/mandannews/community/educating-children-on-healthy-living/article_5593a409-9da0-521c-afe5-83de491cf88e.html

Healthy Living: Father of six receives first meniscus replacement in San Diego

SAN DIEGO (KUSI) — 40-year old Justin Marchand is one active dad. Surfing, mountain biking and paddle boarding are just some of his passions.  The father of six also works as a pool technician spending a lot of time on his feet.  Despite two surgeries to repair a torn meniscus in his left knee,  he’s still in a lot of pain.

As his family wishes him well from the waiting room, Justin gets ready to become the first person in San Diego to receive a meniscus replacement.  He’s participating in a clinical trial underway at Grossmont Orthopedic Medical Group, one of only 10 sites in the country involved in the study.

Dr. Scott Hacker, a physician for the U.S. Olympic team will be performing the surgery.

“The pain after a meniscal injury can be very debilitating, it often feels like someone’s stabbing you in the knee with a knife,” said Dr. Hacker.

The meniscus is a cushion that sits between the thigh and leg bone, a shock absorber.

“So today we will be inserting an artificial meniscus that basically mimics the way a normal meniscus would work into Justin’s knee to replace that cushion and shock absorber and prevent his knee from developing arthritis as time goes on.”

Dr. Hacker says the hi-tech nu-surface implant is made of plastic that mimics the way a normal meniscus works. As with all implant surgeries, rejection or infection are possible complications.

The device has been used in Europe since 2008 with promising results. 

“This is the treatment that patients come in asking for to put in between bones to cushion the joint and help me avoid knee replacement surgery and this is exactly that,” said Dr. Hacker “It’s a new option for younger, active patients with significant knee damage.

Dr. Hacker says Justin’s surgery went perfectly. He faces six weeks of physical therapy before he can return to his active lifestyle, hopefully pain free.

For more information in how to participate in the meniscus replacement study visit www.sun-trial.com or call (844) 680-8951.

Article source: http://www.kusi.com/story/35992151/healthy-living-father-of-six-receives-first-meniscus-replacement-in-san-diego

Network of Care event promotes healthy living | News …

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Article source: http://www.independenttribune.com/news/network-of-care-event-promotes-healthy-living/article_74721751-3698-565b-949c-d8210abdba19.html

St. Tammany Healthy Living for July 26, 2017

STPH NEUROSCIENCE: St. Tammany Parish Hospital has opened a neuroscience unit, including a four-bed neuro critical care unit and a 10-bed neuro medical surgical care unit. In partnership with Ochsner Health System, STPH expanded neurosciences in 2016 with the addition of Ochsner neurologists and neurosurgeons. STPH opened a larger operating suite in January to accommodate the neurosurgeries being performed.

MALL WALKERS: North Shore Square Mall, 150 Northshore Blvd., Slidell, will open for walkers at 7 a.m. Wednesday, July 26, through a partnership with Slidell Memorial Hospital to encourage people to walk with the advantages of the mall’s security, air conditioning and water fountains. For information, call (985) 280-8529.

ME AND MY TOT TIME: Parents and grandparents will discuss child development issues and parenting tips while their children enjoy playtime with others Wednesday, July 26, in the Community Outreach Center, second floor, Slidell Memorial Hospital Wellness Pavilion, 501 Robert Blvd. The 9:30 a.m. session is for toddlers up to 30 months, and the 11 a.m. session is for ages 31 months to preschool. For information, call (985) 280-8529.

NEWBORN CARE: Feeding, diapering, swaddling and bathing are among the topics to be covered during a newborn care class from 7  p.m. to 9  p.m. Thursday, July 27, in the Magnolia Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. To make a reservation, call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

BABY AND ME: Parents of babies who are not yet walking will share issues and insights about parenting at 10  a.m. Thursday, July 27, in the Community Outreach Center on the second floor of the Slidell Memorial Hospital Wellness Pavilion, 501 Robert Blvd. For information, call (985) 280-8529.

URINARY INCONTINENCE: Dr. Laura Desrosiers, an obstetrician-gynecologist, will discuss risk factors and treatment options for urinary incontinence at 11 a.m. Friday, July 28, in the first-floor conference room of the Slidell Memorial Hospital Founders Building, 1150 Robert Blvd. The free presentation is part of Slidell Memorial’s Lunch Learn series. To register, call (985) 280-2657.

BREAST-FEEDING CLINIC: Lactation consultants will offer support and encouragement from 9:30  a.m. to noon Saturday, July 29, in the Florida Avenue conference room at Slidell Memorial Hospital, 1025 Florida Ave., Slidell. The program is free. To register, call (985) 280-8585 or visit slidellmemorial.org

YOGA FOR CANCER PATIENTS: 5:30 p.m. Monday, July 31, Community Outreach Center, second floor, Slidell Memorial Hospital Wellness Pavilion, 501 Robert Blvd. Classes are free, but registration and medical release are required. (985) 707-4961.

GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP: Certified grief counselor Sue deRada will lead the Open Arms grief support group at 11 a.m. Wednesday, Aug. 2, at Piccadilly Cafeteria, 104 U.S. 190 Business, Slidell. The cost is $10. The next session will be Aug. 16. To register, call (985) 630-6363.

MEDICARE 101: A free presentation on the the basics of Medicare Part A, B, C and D coverage will be held from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 3, at the Slidell Library, 555 Robert Blvd. The program will be repeated from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 24, at the Causeway Library, 3457 U.S. 190, Mandeville. To register, visit www.bit.ly/stplregister or call the hosting library: Slidell, (985) 646-6470, or Causeway, (985) 626-9779.

CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP: 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m., first and third Fridays of the month, Women’s Center for Healing and Transformation, 71667 Leveson St., Abita Springs. The next meeting will be Aug. 4. (985) 892-8111.

STROKE SUPPORT GROUP: A support group for stroke survivors and their caregivers will meet from 5:30  p.m. to 6:30  p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 9, in the Magnolia Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. Topics include nutrition, social services, rehabilitation therapy and medical management. To register, call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

BASIC LIFE SUPPORT FOR HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS: Caregivers may benefit from a basic life support course to be held from 8:15  a.m. to 12:30  p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 9, in the Pelican Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. The course is designed to teach CPR for victims of all ages and use of an automated external defibrillator. Cost is $35, plus a $20 deposit for the book. Call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

LAMAZE CHILDBIRTH CLASS: Relaxation and breathing techniques for natural childbirth, signs and symptoms of labor, and postpartum care will be discussed during a Lamaze childbirth class to be held from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 17, in the Pelican Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. To reserve a spot, call (985) 867-3900 or visit www.lakeviewregional.com.

NORTHSHORE BIRTH OPTIONS: Jen Kamel, founder of VBAC Facts, will present a workshop on vaginal birth after cesareans from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 26, at Staybridge Suites, 140 Holiday Blvd., Covington. The workshop is being organized by Northshore Birth Options. The cost is $125. Participants will receive 6.6 nursing continuing education hours. For information, email options@northshorebirth.org. For tickets, visit eventbrite.com.

TOTAL JOINT CLASS: A physical therapist, surgical nurse, case manager and orthopedic nurse will discuss preoperative and postoperative care for patients undergoing total joint replacement surgery at 1  p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 30, in the Magnolia Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. To reserve a spot, call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

MEDICARE AND SOCIAL SECURITY: Representatives of the Simon Simon Group will give a presentation on Medicare and Social Security from 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 31, at the Community Center at Christwood, 100 Christwood Blvd., Covington. The presentation is part of the center’s Wisdom Wine lecture series. The cost is $5. To reserve your spot, call (985) 292-1234.

RELAY FOR LIFE: The American Cancer Society will present the Relay for Life of St. Tammany West from 11:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 9, at Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. To participate, visit Relayforlife.org/weststtammanyla or call Heidi McGrath at (985) 966-4731.

PREPARING FOR CHILDBIRTH: When to come to the hospital, pain management and complications in pregnancy are among the topics that will be discussed during a childbirth preparation program from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Monday, Sept. 11, in the Magnolia Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. To register, call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

STROKE SUPPORT GROUP: A support group for stroke survivors and their caregivers will meet from 5:30  p.m. to 6:30  p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 13, in the Magnolia Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. Discussion topics include nutrition, social services, rehabilitation therapy and medical management. To register, call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

BREAST-FEEDING CLASS: The benefits and process of breast-feeding, including positioning and latching, will be addressed during a class from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, Sept. 16, in the Magnolia Room at Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. To register, call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

TOTAL JOINT CLASS: A physical therapist, surgical nurse, case manager and orthopedic nurse will discuss preoperative and postoperative care for patients undergoing total joint replacement surgery at 1  p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 19, in the Magnolia Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. To reserve a spot, call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

GIRL TALK: Preteen and teen girls will learn about the physical, social and emotional changes of puberty during the Girl Talk session from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 19, in the first-floor conference room of the Slidell Memorial Hospital Founders Building, 1150 Robert Blvd., Slidell. Presenters will include pediatrician Alice LeBreton and dermatologist Deborah Hilton. Teens must be accompanied by an adult. The fee is $10 per family. To register, call (985) 280-2657 or visit slidellmemorial.org.

BASIC LIFE SUPPORT FOR HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS: Caregivers may benefit from a basic life support course to be held from 8:15  a.m. to 12:30  p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 20, in the Pelican Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. The course is designed to teach CPR for victims of all ages and use of an automated external defibrillator. The cost is $35 for the class, plus a $20 deposit for the book. To reserve a spot, call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

LAKEVIEW REGIONAL AUXILIARY: The Lakeview Regional Medical Center Volunteer Auxiliary will hold a Savvy Linens fundraiser from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday, Sept. 20-21, in the main entrance lobby of the hospital, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. Proceeds will benefit the auxiliary’s charities in St. Tammany Parish.

NEWBORN CARE: Feeding, diapering, swaddling and bathing are among the topics to be covered during a newborn care class from 7  p.m. to 9  p.m. Thursday, Sept. 21, in the Magnolia Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. To make a reservation, call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

TOTAL JOINT CLASS: A physical therapist, surgical nurse, case manager and orthopedic nurse will discuss preoperative and postoperative care for patients undergoing total joint replacement surgery at 1  p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 3, in the Pelican Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. To reserve a spot, call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

LAKEVIEW REGIONAL AUXILIARY: The Lakeview Regional Medical Center Volunteer Auxiliary will hold a jewelry sale Wednesday through Friday, Oct. 4-6, in the main entrance lobby of the hospital, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. Sale hours will be from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oct. 4, from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Oct. 5, and from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Oct. 6. Proceeds will benefit the auxiliary’s charities in St. Tammany Parish.

SIBLING CLASS IN COVINGTON: A class for children ages 3-8 who are about to be big brothers and sisters will be held from 10  a.m. to noon Saturday, Oct. 7, in the Magnolia Room at Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. The children will watch a video about what it will be like to have a new baby at home and will practice with dolls or stuffed animals they have brought. To register, call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

STROKE SUPPORT GROUP: A support group for stroke survivors and their caregivers will meet from 5:30  p.m. to 6:30  p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 11, in the Magnolia Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. Discussion topics include nutrition, social services, rehabilitation therapy and medical management. To register, call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

BASIC LIFE SUPPORT FOR HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS: Caregivers may benefit from a basic life support course to be held from 8:15  a.m. to 12:30  p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 11, in the Pelican Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. The course is designed to teach CPR for victims of all ages and use of an automated external defibrillator. The cost is $35 for the class, plus a $20 deposit for the book. To reserve a spot, call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

LAMAZE CHILDBIRTH CLASS: Relaxation and breathing techniques for natural childbirth, signs and symptoms of labor, and postpartum care will be discussed during a Lamaze childbirth class to be held from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 12, in the Magnolia Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. Bring a pillow and blanket. To reserve a spot, call (985) 867-3900 or visit www.lakeviewregional.com.

TOTAL JOINT CLASS: A physical therapist, surgical nurse, case manager and orthopedic nurse will discuss preoperative and postoperative care for patients undergoing total joint replacement surgery at 1  p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 17, in the Pelican Room of Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. To reserve a spot, call (985) 867-3900 or visit lakeviewregional.com.

NUTRITION: Rebecca Lee will discuss approaches to achieving a healthy weight from 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 26, at the Community Center at Christwood, 100 Christwood Blvd., Covington. The presentation is part of the center’s Wisdom Wine lecture series. The cost is $5. To reserve your spot, call (985) 292.1234.

BOO FEST: The ACCESS nonprofit for children with disabilities will be the beneficiaries of Boo Fest 2017, which will be from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 28, at Lakeview Regional Medical Center, 95 Judge Tanner Blvd., Covington. The gates will open at 9 a.m. for special-needs families. Admission is $2. There will be more than 70 haunted houses, costume contests, pumpkin decorating, face painting and all-abilities games. ACCESS stands for Adapting and Changing Children’s Environments with Successful Solutions. Also, the Northshore Area Board of Realtors will hold its Chili Challenge during Boo Fest. For information, visit accesslouisiana.org/boofest-2017.

FOOT CARE: Dr. Ryan Green will give a presentation, ”The Right Fit for Your Feet,” from 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 14, at the Community Center at Christwood, 100 Christwood Blvd., Covington. The presentation is part of the center’s Wisdom Wine lecture series. The cost is $5. To reserve your spot, call (985) 292.1234.

BABY AND ME TOBACCO-FREE: Slidell Memorial Hospital is holding smoking-cessation programs on Mondays and Wednesdays by appointment. For information or to request an application, call Ashlee Menke at (504) 733-5539. 

GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS: Gamblers Anonymous meets several times a week throughout the New Orleans area. Gamblers Anonymous is a fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength and hope with one another that they may solve their common problem and help others to recover from a gambling problem. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop gambling. For information, call (855) 222-5542 or visit gamblersanonymous.org.

Article source: http://www.theadvocate.com/new_orleans/news/communities/st_tammany/article_5dc1db22-6995-11e7-bca5-dbe90dd355f1.html

‘Healthy Living for Summer’: Eating organic

Organic food can be more expensive at the grocery store but some experts say investing in your health is worth the cost. In the fifth episode of ABC News’ “Healthy Living for Summer” series, we spoke with chef Tara Punzone from Real Food Daily, a Los Angeles-based organic restaurant.

But first, what does organic mean?

“The word ‘organic’ refers to the way farmers grow and process agricultural products, such as fruits, vegetables, grains, dairy products and meat,” the nonprofit Mayo Clinic states on its website. Organic farming does not permit certain things, such as synthetic fertilizers, sewage sludge as fertilizer, most synthetic pesticides, genetic engineering and antibiotics or growth hormones for livestock.

PHOTO: ABC News discusses organic eating and cooking with chef Tara Punzone. Galia Sotomayor/ABC News
ABC News discusses organic eating and cooking with chef Tara Punzone.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture also sets specific standards for what is certified organic. Food that is organic will carry a USDA Organic seal.

Punzone said eating organic is better because “you’re avoiding chemicals that they’re spraying on foods and chemicals in soil and all kinds of pesticides, and things they have no idea what it does to your health.”

“Research shows people have lower levels of pesticides when eating mostly organic,” according to Karen Smith, senior manager of clinical dietetics at the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine. “But there is no research linking that to disease risk or disease incidence.”

But she did point out that there appears to be a health correlation between pesticides and people working or living in areas with high exposure to them.

“People living in areas where they’re spraying fields with pesticides or working in areas with high pesticide exposures – there are studies showing higher rates of cancer or children having increased risks of birth defects and other diseases,” Smith said.

PHOTO: ABC News discusses organic eating and cooking with chef Tara Punzone. Galia Sotomayor/ABC News
ABC News discusses organic eating and cooking with chef Tara Punzone.

Punzone warns consumers to avoid non-organic soy, corn and wheat.

“Those three things they’re tying to turn out at mass production and speed, they’re inundating these crops with all kinds of chemicals to grow faster and be edible faster and they’re using these products in everything,” she said.

Below is advice Punzone and experts gave ABC News.

Quick tips

  • Find out if your grocery store has an organic section
  • Shop around to compare prices between organic and non-organic items as they may be comparable at certain locations
  • Research what products have higher concentrations of pesticide residues if you need to be selective in your organic purchases
  • Look at the ingredients and check the labels
  • Avoid fake meat products with soy if it is non-organic
  • Eat organic tempeh, beans, nuts and seeds for protein – your body doesn’t need as much energy to break down these foods
  • Stay educated and informed with nutrition facts and laws
  • PHOTO: ABC News discusses organic eating and cooking with chef Tara Punzone. Galia Sotomayor/ABC News
    ABC News discusses organic eating and cooking with chef Tara Punzone.

    While higher prices may hinder some consumers from buying organic, Punzone said organic vegetables and fruits are worth the cost because they have more nutrients and enzymes.

    “You [may be] saving money on non-organic now, but think about what will happen in the future [if you get] sick and you have issues to deal with,” she said.

    Overall, if you can eat organic, “go for it, because we don’t know the potential risks associated with consuming foods high in pesticides and if you’re able to afford and have access to organic foods then I think that’s a great option, but it definitely isn’t the only option,” Smith said.

    And just because a cookie is labeled organic, it doesn’t mean it’s healthy.

    “You have to weigh the risks versus the benefits,” Smith said.

    Watch ABC News discuss organic foods in the video above.

    This weekly health series will continue throughout the summer.

    Article source: http://abcnews.go.com/Health/healthy-living-summer-eating-organic/story?id=48821157

    Promote healthy living with an outdoor pool

    What’s my point with this fictional conversation? It’s that a city the size of Beaver Dam doesn’t have an outdoor pool to utilize in the summer. Don’t get me wrong, my kids and I, along with many other Beaver Dam residents, enjoy going to Fox Lake, Waupun, Columbus, Horicon, Watertown, etc. to enjoy their outdoor pools, but it would be great if we had one in our own community.

    Article source: http://www.wiscnews.com/bdc/opinion/mailbag/article_804aad5e-0acb-57e6-a685-bf5bd87fa339.html

    How to Become More Courageous

    Cultivating courage is not easy. There is a lot of fear and uncertainty in the world. Climate change is an ever-growing threat.  News stations use fear mongering to increase ratings. Internet threads are full of anonymous hatred. Social media has created a toxic FOMO culture. The inequality and injustice among us remains shocking. It’s scary when you think about it, and that fear is reasonable. But a lot of us get paralyzed by fear instead of taking the braver leap forward.

    Courage requires vulnerability, a feeling no one really enjoys. Being courageous means removing your “comfort zone” from the equation and thrusting yourself into uncharted territory. But we can all be more courageous with some radical shifts in thought. Whether you are working on a global, national, local or self-reflective scale, here are 3 tips for becoming a more courageous, self-assured person.

    Embrace your fears.

    The pervading myth seems to be that our fears are something we should be ashamed of; that they should be kept under a dark cloak in a dusty corner, out of view. But being open with yourself about your fears can make it easier to overcome them. For starters, stop being so hard on yourself for having fears in the first place. The bravest men and women of history had fears, too. But courage and fear can actually co-exist.

    Are you afraid of not being enough? Afraid of being kidnapped? Afraid of the ocean? Afraid of embarrassing yourself? Afraid of the uncertainty of climate change? The first step to courageously facings a fear is in acknowledging it. Accept yourself for who you are and stop trying to hide what you are afraid of.

    Practice self-love.

    If you are going to be courageous and stand up for what you believe in, it is paramount that you love yourself. That means putting your own needs first. If you are feeling stressed and thinly stretched, where will that courage come from? Nowhere. Drink plenty of water, eat nourishing foods, sleep well, de-stress. Be kind to yourself. Courage takes a lot of effort. Take care of your basic needs so that you can be strong and courageous for yourself and others.

    Understand your own power.

    As a human, you have an enormous amount of power and influence on the world. Something as simple as holding the door open for someone or complimenting them can really brighten their day. Conversely, your singular actions also have the potential to ruin a day. You don’t need a lot of money or a big job or beauty to be influential in the world. You have incredible untapped potential, and knowing that can give you the strength to stand tall and fight for yourself and others when you need it. You can make change happen. You are beautiful and powerful. Be courageous.

    Let your fears guide you toward the things you need to stand up for. Take care of yourself, trust yourself, and let your intuition be your guide. And, when it comes time to stand up for what you believe in, you’ll be ready to dig deep into your pool of courage and fight for what’s right.

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    Article source: http://www.care2.com/greenliving/how-to-become-more-courageous.html

    Healthy Living: FIT4MOM






    Elsie  Hedgspeth Fitness Wellness Coorindator  Stroller Strides instructor, Katelynn Clark join us for Healthy Living. 

    Article source: http://www.illinoishomepage.net/the-morning-show/healthy-living-fit4mom/773990013

    Healthy Living: Rotator Cuff Repair

    Enjoy all the island has to offer with a 2 night stay for 2 guests at the Grand Hotel!  910 News along with Grand Hotel, Shepler’s Mackinac Island Ferry, Mackinac Island Carriage Tours, Inc, Pink Pony at the Chippewa Hotel and Original Murdick’s Fudge are coming together to give away a 2 day …

    Article source: http://www.9and10news.com/story/35956830/healthy-living-rotator-cuff-repair