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8 Health Benefits and Uses for Garlic

I remember a call with my mother about a decade ago in which she continually bragged about my three-year-old nephew. She was telling me how much he still enjoyed being cuddled and then paused. “But,” she said, “frequently the smell of garlic coming off of him is overwhelming. He just loves the stuff!” My nephew has eaten a largely raw, plant-based diet since he first started on solid food, and is one of the healthiest kids I know. Instinctively he knew that garlic was one of the world’s superfoods.

Garlic lovers already know how good this food tastes, but they might not know just how amazing it is for their health. Here are some of my favorite health benefits and uses for garlic.

Fresh organic garlic bulbs on old wooden table, selective focus

Anti-viral Aid

According to James Duke, PhD, botanist and author of The Green Pharmacy, several compounds found in garlic, including allicin, have antiviral activity against colds and flu.

Systemic Infection Solution

Countless studies over the last few decades have demonstrated the antibacterial activity of garlic against both gram positive and gram negative strains of bacteria. New research in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology found that garlic is one of the most potent antibacterial herbs. Of the 83 herbs tested, compounds in garlic and juniper showed the highest antibacterial action, including against drug-resistant infections like S. aureus and E. coli. S. Aureus (the bacteria that is involved in MRSA infections) can cause systemic infections of the blood, heart, spinal cord or bones.

Ulcer Aid

Garlic is such a superb antibacterial agent, it is of little surprise that more and more research links it to destroying infections that even antibiotics cannot address. Recent research in the Avicenna Journal of Phytomedicine found that raw garlic showed potency against H. pylori—the antibiotic-resistant bacteria linked to conditions like stomach ulcers.

Urinary Tract Infection Alleviator

Anyone who has ever had a urinary tract infection knows how difficult they can be to treat. The Journal of Parasitic Diseases concluded that garlic was effective against bacteria linked to urinary tract infections, even when antibiotics failed.

Tuberculosis Tamer

Research in the International Journal of Mycobacteriology found that garlic was one of fifteen plants that showed effectiveness against tuberculosis.

Cancer Fighter

Allicin is not only a natural antibiotic, it is also an antioxidant that helps to prevent the cell damage that can be a precursor of cancer. Researchers have concluded that garlic has the ability to inhibit different types of tumors and lower the risks of esophageal, stomach and prostate cancer. Research has also shown that allicin can not only slow the proliferation of human gastric cancer cells, but also cause cancer cell death.

High Blood Pressure and Heart Disease Remedy

Many studies have demonstrated garlic’s heart-healing ability over the last few decades. A recent study similarly concluded that garlic can help reduce high blood pressure and the risk for heart disease. The researchers also found that garlic supplements did not interfere with medications used to treat these conditions. Other research found that garlic significantly reduced triglycerides, high levels of which are linked to heart disease.

Diabetes Aid

Exciting new research in the journal Molecular Nutrition and Food Research found that aged garlic extract was effective at reducing some markers for diabetes and may offer hope in the treatment of diabetes.

Using Garlic

There are very few savory dishes that don’t benefit from the addition of garlic. You can add it to soups, stews, stir-fries, curries, sauces and pastas.

When supplementing with garlic, follow package directions as there is a large variation in dosages and active ingredients between products.

Related:
Don’t Believe in Herbal Medicine? 10 Things to Change Your Mind
The 5 Best Herbs to Soothe Your Nerves
Should You Actually Starve a Fever?

 

Dr. Michelle Schoffro Cook, PhD, DNM is the publisher of the free e-news World’s Healthiest News, president of PureFood BC, and an international best-selling and 20-time published book author whose works include the upcoming book: : Be Your Own Herbalist: Essential Herbs for Health, Beauty Cooking.

Article source: http://www.care2.com/greenliving/8-health-benefits-and-uses-for-garlic.html

St. Patrick Hospital – YMCA Form Three Year Healthy Living Partnership

photo by Peter Christian
St. Patrick Hospital

Two Missoula institutions, Providence St. Patrick Hospital and the Missoula Family YMCA announced on Thursday a three year agreement to grow preventive healthcare options for the Missoula area.

YMCA CEO Brian Steffen said the germ of the partnership began with a lunch meeting with former Providence CEO Jeff Fee where they shared their vision to improve health in Missoula.

“That led to a meeting between the senior executives of the YMCA and the senior executives of Providence Health and Services Western Montana to discuss how we could collaborate together,” Steffen said. “Honestly, the list we’ve put together is over three pages of ideas that we’re dreaming on, and the details are still being nailed down about how to affect population health.”

Specifically, Steffen said programs are being developed for those with diabetes, cardiac problems or cancer.

“We’ve also had some unique ideas like how we can help families where they’ve had a new birth in the family and how St. Pat’s and the YMCA can work together, such as providing a free membership for a period of time for the family so they can come to the YMCA, work on health goals and socialization, growing as a family and growing in the community.”

Steffen said the ‘Y’ is looking forward to how St. Pat’s can help with a program called ‘Splash’ for third graders to help them become more confident in the pool  and a program for all sixth graders in Missoula called ‘After 6″ where they can come to the ‘Y’ to learn healthy habits.

More information about Providence Health Services Western Montana can be found at montana.providence.org. More information about the Greater Missoula Family YMCA can be found at ymcamissoula.org.

Article source: http://newstalkkgvo.com/st-patrick-hospital-ymca-form-three-year-healthy-living-partnership/

Keswick campus to get Center for Healthy Living – Baltimore Sun

Keswick, which provides long-term care and other services to seniors, plans to open a Center for Health Living housed on its campus in Baltimore’s Roland Park-Hampden area.

The center will connect older adults in the community to health and wellness services that can help them stay fit and in their own homes.

Keswick residents and community members will have access to programs focused on socialization, education, arts, lifelong learning and exercise. There will also be information on chronic disease and care management.

The center, spanning more than 10,000 square feet, is currently being designed and will be located inside Keswick’s Bauernschmidt Building.

4 ways to help map a path to healthy living | Warr | NJ.com

By Al Warr

Healthy living means taking control of the pieces of your life. But taking control can frequently mean you must seek help from experts.

Anyone can do lots of reading and research on healthy living. The amount of information is overwhelming, however, and it always leads to more questions and more blind alleys.

Everyone needs a personal road map pointing to a desirable healthy living goal. In different people, healthy living can mean seeing to eating habits, giving more attention to exercise, and some hand-holding in tackling bad habits.

***

“My passion is to see people healed,” said Brad Snyder. “What I do is sit with people and put together protocols.”

Brad is widely known in this area. He owned and operated the Balance Health store on Route 22 in Lebanon for years. He sold that operation about 10 years ago – it still operates, now named Healthy Balance. Today, Brad devotes full time to his Innovative Therapies operation.

“People have different genetic conditions,” he told me. “The beauty of sitting down with individuals is that the protocol is specific to that person. The goal is to use herbal supplements and dietary regimens to bring the body back to homeostasis.”

Brad works with all types and ages of people, as well as with doctors practicing traditional medicine and who are open to complementary therapies. Some of his clients are elderly and in need of dietary modifications. Others are youngsters in need of nutritional requirements for sports or getting back to healthy living.

He is currently formulating a therapeutic drink for a biotech company, and he is developing his own line of products. He currently serves as the president of the New Jersey chapter of the American Herbalist Guild.  

For more information, call Brad at 908-310-6505. Innovative Therapies is located at 75 East Washington St., Washington.

You can meet Brad for a consultation at the Healthy Balance store, located at The Annex at Lebanon Plaza, 1265 Route 22, Lebanon. He is there most Saturdays, from 11 to 3. Stop in to learn more and make an appointment.

***

“Counseling differs from social work,” said Ruth Altamura-Roll. She is a licensed professional counselor, and she has more than 30 years experience.

She handles a variety of problems, including couples and marriage problems, addictions, eating disorders, post traumatic stress, obsessive compulsive disorders, depression, grief and others. She concentrates on the whole person.

“Heroin is a major disorder currently,” she noted. “Eating disorders frequently fall into a form of addiction, and I might want them to work with a nutritionist.”

She approaches problems with a certain detachment, she explained. Having some detachment, she can be empathetic.

“We are taught how to counsel, bringing different theories to the process,” she added.

Every Wednesday, beginning at noon, she holds an hour-long Counselor’s Chat on local radio. You can listen at HunterdonChamberRadio.com.

For more information, call 908-237-2899 and visit AltaRollCounselor.net. Her office is located at 26 Main St., Flemington.

***

Healthy living requires attention to the physical body. And that is what the Hunterdon Pilates operation is all about.

“We concentrate on building strong core muscles, correcting muscle imbalances, building strength and flexibility,” said Connie Fazekas.

She started Hunterdon Pilates back in February of 2000. The operation was located at 23 West Main, Clinton. Last May, there was a devastating fire, and she moved to 65 Route 22.

“We were in the process of manufacturing our own equipment, called the Exero system,” she explained. “Exero is now out and running. It’s a vertical Pilates machine, and it’s in a class by itself.”

Her Exero machine took over seven years to develop, and it required lots of engineering expertise and inputs. Today, the unique machine is used in her operation, and sales to other Pilates studios are well underway.

Connie employs certified instructors, and she invites the public to see demonstrations. She offers private sessions and classes in Pilates, including the vertical Exero and yoga flow, both here and in other locations. She is planning an open house during May – stay tuned.

For more information, call 908-730-0300 and visit HunterdonPilates.com.

***

Barry Wolfson has a Master’s Degree in counseling and 30 years experience in hypnosis.

His Hypnosis Counseling Center Flemington has scheduled a special set of three workshops on three consecutive Saturday mornings in May. The separate sessions cover Smoking Cessation, Weight Loss, and Better Sleep.

“Hypnosis is a medically approved method of tapping the normally inaccessible power of the mind and correcting negative behavior,” he said.

The sessions are set for May 6, May 13 and May 20. Stop Smoking is from 9 to 10. Weight Loss is from 10 to 11. And Better Sleep is from 11 to noon. Classes are limited to 10 people, and the cost is $119. Attendees get a reinforcement CD, journaling, and group support.

For more information and to register, call 908-303-7767. Visit HypnosisNJ.com. The Flemington center is located at 28 Mine St.

Al Warr can be reached at 610-253-0432 or AlWarr16@gmail.com

Article source: http://www.nj.com/hunterdon/index.ssf/2017/04/help_in_laying_out_your_roadmap_to_healthy_living.html

Healthy living: Personalized cancer care

This week’s healthy living takes a look at a new personalized way to treat people with cancer that’s happening in San Diego. 

According to the American Cancer Society, more than 1.6 million people in our country will be diagnosed with cancer this year. About one-third will die from the disease.

While survival rates for certain types of cancer have improved over the years, the way doctors treat it has remained the same and unfortunately, the chemotherapy cocktail most patients endure is often ineffective. 

But a San Diego entrepreneur is working to change that. His life depends on it, and if you have cancer, yours may too. 

CureMatch is a startup company focusing on personal cancer care. It’s founder, Blaise Barrelet, is a venture capitalist with a background in big data and artificial intelligence. He’s been very successful launching various tech companies. He sold San Diego-based Webside Story in a billion dollar deal in 2004. 

CureMatch is much more personal.

“I got diagnosed with cancer and it really changed the way I look at life science,” Barrelet said.

Barrelet, a husband and father, was living the good life in Rancho Santa Fe when he learned four years ago he has an aggressive form of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

“At first you’re in shock, numb, didn’t know what to do and then I started to research,” he said.

His research made him realize standard chemotherapy was not the answer.

“The standard of care for most cancer is chemo. I think people believe cancer is attached to an organ and that everybody who’s got pancreatic cancer has the same cancer and it’s absolutely not true,” Barrelet said.

In fact, the genetic makeup of every tumor is as individual as a fingerprint. No two cancers are exactly the same. But the standard for treating cancer today, chemo and radiation, is approached like a one treatment works for most.

“We have good drugs, but if you give the a drug to the wrong patient, it doesn’t work,” said Dr. Razelle Kurzrock, one of the nation’s leading Oncologists.

Kurzrock was recruited from MD Anderson Cancer to work at UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center. She’s also a co-founder of CureMatch.

“In the past it’s been a guessing game. And we would give a drug to a patient and out of 100 patients, 20 would really benefit and 80 would receive no benefit and might even be harmed by the drug. Now we’re beginning to understand exactly which drugs and combo’s of drugs to give to each individual patient to see each tumor as an individual tumor and match patients with the right drugs,” she said.

Using technology created at the Moores Cancer Center and the San Diego Supercomputer Center, Dr. Kurzrock, along with renowned scientist and CureMatch Co-Founder Igor Tsigelny, are able to match cancer patients with the most effective drugs.

And it’s not ways. Of the 300 FDA approved cancer drugs, if you combine two of them, there are 45,000 options. When you combine three, there are 5.4 billion.

“There is no way a doctor or anybody. I don’t care how smart they are can process that information,” Dr. Kurzrock said.

But the supercomputer can in about 10 minutes. Through genomic sequencing, it can determine which combination of drugs will have the best chance of killing cancer cells.

After a patient’s blood or tumor samples are analyzed, they receive a CureMatch report. It includes a detailed molecular profile of their tumor and the top five to 10 combinations of FDA approved drugs that will target their cancer.

The results are then sent to the patient’s oncologist.

“There’s a mixed feeling there.  I think oncologists are scared. It’s no different than cab drivers being scared of Uber.  It’s gonna happen, they’re gonna have to be part of it.  And we explain we’re not here to replace them, we’re here to empower them,” Barrelet said.

The technology is currently available to patients at Moore’s Cancer Center. The goal of CureMatch is to make it available to anyone anywhere.

“I don’t want to exaggerate what we can do, but I do think it’s making an impact and that slowly we’re gonna be transforming cancer through these types of modalities,” Dr. Kurzrock said.

For Barrelet, the stakes are high.

The CureMatch team predicts in 10 to 15 years, cancer will be a treatable, chronic disease, much like diabetes or even AIDs.

The cost for genomic sequencing of tumors? $5,000. 

Doctors are UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center are already offering it to their patients, which some insurance companies will cover.

Article source: http://www.kusi.com/story/35281117/healthy-living-personalized-cancer-care

River Region Healthy Living Expo

Alabama News Network presented the second annual River Region Healthy Living Expo. It was held Friday at Frazer Memorial United Methodist Church in Montgomery. More than 40 vendors came out offering health and medical advice. The community could get blood pressure checks, massages, and information on many programs to help you live a healthy life. And it was all for free.

Kathy Lenoir was a vendor with “Your Doctor’s Office.” She tells us why she wanted to come get involved with the Expo.

“Just to get our name out there and let people know that we are a new business and to help people. You have people who want to lose weight or have blood sugar problems. We can help maybe if they’ve never been anywhere, we can help them here and then send them to the office to get help,” said Lenoir.

Connie Hamilton attended the event and was glad she did.

“I just wanted to get some information on healthy living and what to do. I was talking about your heart and everything and try to keep, you know, kinda stay up above things and how well you can keep yourself going,” said Hamilton.

The expo was free and open to the public. However, the community was encouraged to bring a canned food item for the Montgomery Area Food Bank.

Article source: http://www.alabamanews.net/2017/04/28/river-region-healthy-living-expo/

Keswick campus to get Center for Healthy Living

Keswick, which provides long-term care and other services to seniors, plans to open a Center for Health Living housed on its campus in Baltimore’s Roland Park-Hampden area.

The center will connect older adults in the community to health and wellness services that can help them stay fit and in their own homes.

Keswick residents and community members will have access to programs focused on socialization, education, arts, lifelong learning and exercise. There will also be information on chronic disease and care management.

The center, spanning more than 10,000 square feet, is currently being designed and will be located inside Keswick’s Bauernschmidt Building.

Healthy Living Longer Fair To Feature CT Authors

The Welles-Turner Memorial Library is presenting a “Healthy Living Longer Author Fair,” which will feature three Connecticut authors and their books that provide tips for wellness.

Rescheduled from a snowed-out date in March, the fair will take place April 30, from 2 to 4 p.m. in the Friends Room at the library.

Nicole Cignoli, the library’s reference librarian, said the idea of a healthy living fair came last fall, when the library was looking for ways to support local authors, and was approached by Janet Verney, author of ROOTS2Wellness, with the idea of an author fair.

“She and I worked together on it, and then she brought in her colleagues,” Cignoli said. “It’s about getting ready for the summer, supporting our health, and supporting independent authors.”

4 ways to help map a path to healthy living | Warr

By Al Warr

Healthy living means taking control of the pieces of your life. But taking control can frequently mean you must seek help from experts.

Anyone can do lots of reading and research on healthy living. The amount of information is overwhelming, however, and it always leads to more questions and more blind alleys.

Everyone needs a personal road map pointing to a desirable healthy living goal. In different people, healthy living can mean seeing to eating habits, giving more attention to exercise, and some hand-holding in tackling bad habits.

***

“My passion is to see people healed,” said Brad Snyder. “What I do is sit with people and put together protocols.”

Brad is widely known in this area. He owned and operated the Balance Health store on Route 22 in Lebanon for years. He sold that operation about 10 years ago – it still operates, now named Healthy Balance. Today, Brad devotes full time to his Innovative Therapies operation.

“People have different genetic conditions,” he told me. “The beauty of sitting down with individuals is that the protocol is specific to that person. The goal is to use herbal supplements and dietary regimens to bring the body back to homeostasis.”

Brad works with all types and ages of people, as well as with doctors practicing traditional medicine and who are open to complementary therapies. Some of his clients are elderly and in need of dietary modifications. Others are youngsters in need of nutritional requirements for sports or getting back to healthy living.

He is currently formulating a therapeutic drink for a biotech company, and he is developing his own line of products. He currently serves as the president of the New Jersey chapter of the American Herbalist Guild.  

For more information, call Brad at 908-310-6505. Innovative Therapies is located at 75 East Washington St., Washington.

You can meet Brad for a consultation at the Healthy Balance store, located at The Annex at Lebanon Plaza, 1265 Route 22, Lebanon. He is there most Saturdays, from 11 to 3. Stop in to learn more and make an appointment.

***

“Counseling differs from social work,” said Ruth Altamura-Roll. She is a licensed professional counselor, and she has more than 30 years experience.

She handles a variety of problems, including couples and marriage problems, addictions, eating disorders, post traumatic stress, obsessive compulsive disorders, depression, grief and others. She concentrates on the whole person.

“Heroin is a major disorder currently,” she noted. “Eating disorders frequently fall into a form of addiction, and I might want them to work with a nutritionist.”

She approaches problems with a certain detachment, she explained. Having some detachment, she can be empathetic.

“We are taught how to counsel, bringing different theories to the process,” she added.

Every Wednesday, beginning at noon, she holds an hour-long Counselor’s Chat on local radio. You can listen at HunterdonChamberRadio.com.

For more information, call 908-237-2899 and visit AltaRollCounselor.net. Her office is located at 26 Main St., Flemington.

***

Healthy living requires attention to the physical body. And that is what the Hunterdon Pilates operation is all about.

“We concentrate on building strong core muscles, correcting muscle imbalances, building strength and flexibility,” said Connie Fazekas.

She started Hunterdon Pilates back in February of 2000. The operation was located at 23 West Main, Clinton. Last May, there was a devastating fire, and she moved to 65 Route 22.

“We were in the process of manufacturing our own equipment, called the Exero system,” she explained. “Exero is now out and running. It’s a vertical Pilates machine, and it’s in a class by itself.”

Her Exero machine took over seven years to develop, and it required lots of engineering expertise and inputs. Today, the unique machine is used in her operation, and sales to other Pilates studios are well underway.

Connie employs certified instructors, and she invites the public to see demonstrations. She offers private sessions and classes in Pilates, including the vertical Exero and yoga flow, both here and in other locations. She is planning an open house during May – stay tuned.

For more information, call 908-730-0300 and visit HunterdonPilates.com.

***

Barry Wolfson has a Master’s Degree in counseling and 30 years experience in hypnosis.

His Hypnosis Counseling Center Flemington has scheduled a special set of three workshops on three consecutive Saturday mornings in May. The separate sessions cover Smoking Cessation, Weight Loss, and Better Sleep.

“Hypnosis is a medically approved method of tapping the normally inaccessible power of the mind and correcting negative behavior,” he said.

The sessions are set for May 6, May 13 and May 20. Stop Smoking is from 9 to 10. Weight Loss is from 10 to 11. And Better Sleep is from 11 to noon. Classes are limited to 10 people, and the cost is $119. Attendees get a reinforcement CD, journaling, and group support.

For more information and to register, call 908-303-7767. Visit HypnosisNJ.com. The Flemington center is located at 28 Mine St.

Al Warr can be reached at 610-253-0432 or AlWarr16@gmail.com

Article source: http://www.nj.com/hunterdon/index.ssf/2017/04/help_in_laying_out_your_roadmap_to_healthy_living.html

Holistic Health Fair features healthy-living demos, international eats – Charleston Gazette


Waakye is a traditional Ghanaian dish of cooked rice and beans — and this week you won’t need to go to West Africa to taste it.

The dish (pronounced wah-CHAY) will be one of several international foods available for sale at this weekend’s Holistic Health and Wellness Fair at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 520 Kanawha Blvd. E, an annual fundraiser that takes place from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. (If you can’t make it to the fair, scroll down to see how to make the recipe yourself!)

The fair, held in conjunction with the Chi-Lin Martial Arts Association, is focused on holistic services, products and healthful foods as part of an event to promote individuals, businesses and ideas devoted to healthy lifestyles and healing. It takes place on the 18th annual World Tai Chi and Qigong Day, features speakers and more than 30 vendor booths, plus demonstrations of yoga, Tai Chi, acupuncture, chakra dance and international and wild food dishes.

Nezeziyah Sakuhai will help prepare the Ghanaian dish for the event.

“I originally had the dish for the first time a few years ago, and I always wanted to know how to make it,” said Sakuhai.

The Chicago native moved to West Virginia a few years ago and is a student at The Earth Center, 1590 Jackson St. The center is part of a worldwide group that promotes traditional culture and spirituality, particularly from West Africa, she said.

“We also offer herbs which are kind of like an alternative to modern medicine that is so popular these days,” she said. “These are time-tested herbs that have worked for many thousands of years.”

Her connection with the center has affected her life on multiple levels, she said.

“It really just helps me in so many ways to kind of have a better idea of what my purpose in life is as a human being and how I can change myself and change the world around me.”

Other international dishes featured at the event will include two Persian chicken and fish dishes by Annette Zavareei and a vegan pasta dish by Becky Martin. Another speaker, Nannette Hosley, will present two dishes from her travels in Tibet and Nepal.

squf; squf; squf;

The fundraiser also features a keynote address by Don Gartman on “Wild Foods Preparation and Collecting.” Gartman is a member of the National Wild Foods Association, a group started in 1968 by Edelene Wood of Parkersburg, and the famous wild foods expert and outdoorsman Euell Gibbons, author of “Stalking the Wild Asparagus.”

“He’s the one that really started the whole back-to-earth movement, you might call it,” said Gartman.

Gibbons, who was born in 1911, became an expert in wild foods by necessity, he said. “Euell lived through the Depression and supplied food to his family. This wasn’t just a hobby.”

In a New Yorker profile from the early ’60s by John McPhee, the writer accompanied Gibbons on a six-day canoe trip down the Susquehanna River, and they took no food with them, said Gartman. “They lived off the land, literally, for seven days. Euell Gibbons showed them like 37 different things they ate.”

When the wild foods craze first took hold in the late ’60s, many people who grew up during the Depression were not so keen on the idea, said Gartman.

“A lot of folks said, ‘No, no, that reminds me of the Depression and reminds me of how poor we were. When grocery stores came along, we were so happy.’”

Times have certainly changed for wild foods, he added. On a recent visit to a Whole Foods store, Gartman said he found morel mushrooms for sale for $90 a pound.

“Ramps were selling for some outrageous thing — for $12 a bunch,” he said.

There is also a new niche trend in gourmet restaurants for wild foods, said Gartman. “People go out and harvest wild foods and take them in and have a gourmet chef prepare them. I don’t know if we’ll ever get that in West Virginia, but it’s possible.”

Many of our medicines also started out from natural products, he said. Medicines made from the bark of willow and other salicylate-rich plants date to antiquity and led to the creation of aspirin, said Gartman.

Gartman will be bringing to the health fair some wild food delicacies, including ramp pesto and pickled ramps.

He had taken time out Tuesday for an interview while making another ramp-based dish.

“My wife and I are making ramp butter today,” said Gartman. “Livens up your toast.”

squf; squf; squf;

Other presenters at the fair include:

n Jim Charley — Art Therapy

n Kate Long — Try This WV

n Cathy Grant — Music Therapy

n Julie Williams — Essential Oils

n Charlotte Pritt — Better Balance Wellness

n Millie Snyder — Weight loss guru, Author of “Lean and Luscious” cookbooks

n Linda Sodaro — Skinny Piggy Kombucha

n Valley Wellness Pharmacy

n Emily Jones — Yoga

n Healthy Life Market

n Nanette Mosley — Crystal Jewelry from Tibet

n Alexa Peck — Massage Therapy

n Linda Toborowski — Reki

n Carol Tucker — Charleston Blues Society

n Rose Jacobs — Acupuncture

n Bob Fisher — Art Therapy

n Stephanie Harper — Fusion Yoga and Energy Medicine

n Paul Leach — Herbal Teas/Consulting

n Sifu Renu Chakrabarty — Tai Chi

n Frank Ma — Chi Yoga

n Kasabez MaakMaah — African Herbs

n Jennifer McGee — Health and Wellness

n Gregg and Suzanne Ferguson — Urbalachian Recycling

For more information, call 304-345-5042 or visit facebook.com/events/771623229678849. The Unitarian website is uucharlestonwv.org.

Contact Douglas Imbrogno at 304-348-3017, e-mail douglas@wvgazettemail.com and follow him on Twitter at @douglaseye.

Waakye Recipe

Courtesy of Nezeziyah Sakuhai

1 pound black-eyed peas

4​ cups rice

5 cups ​w​ater

6 teaspoons ​potassium solution (obtained at African or international stores)

​Vegetable to​ppings:

1 or 2 tomatoes

1 onion

1/4 cup of olive oil

Add the black-eyed peas and water to a large stockpot and bring to a boil. Meanwhile, prepare the vegetable toppings.

Dice the tomatoes and onions. Julienne the onions and fry in the oil. Boil until black-eyed peas are about 75 percent done (about 45 minutes).

Remove 1 cup of water, reserving for later. Add potassium to pot. (Potassium is often used in West African cooking to reduce acidity. When the waakye is done, the potassium will give it a distinct reddish color.)

Add salt to taste. Immediately add rice while stirring, leaving an inch of water above the rice.

Once the water boils, simmer the black-eyed peas and rice for about 20 minutes, or until water has been absorbed.

Add the hot water from the cup, as needed to continue cooking the black-eyed peas and rice.

Once done, serve the waakye topped with the vegetables and fried onions.

Article source: http://www.wvgazettemail.com/life-food-and-dining/20170425/holistic-health-fair-features-healthy-living-demos-international-eats