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Students learn healthy living | News, Sports, Jobs

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WARREN — Each week, fifth- to eighth-grade students at McGuffey PK-8 School spend time after school learning ways to stay healthy through fitness and food choice.

McGuffey School guidance counselor Jill Redmond said the McGuffey fitness and wellness program is held for 14 sessions, once per week from February to May.

She said for the first six weeks, students learn about making healthy food choices and ways they can cook and prepare food. For the remaining weeks, a dance teacher, personal trainer and yoga instructor provided ways for children to exercise.

Redmond said 22 students were selected to be part of the program.

For one session, Marie Economos, educator, family consumer sciences, and Garvin McCorkle, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education program assistant, of The Ohio State Extension Office in Cortland, came to the school to show students how to prepare healthy meals and snacks if their parents are not home.

“The key is learning how to prepare the food themselves. There are many students who did not know how to prepare food,” Redmond said.

She said the keys of the program is the importance of teamwork and also being able to fix food yourself.

“They are learning about eating healthier and also seeking fitness and cooking careers,” Redmond said.

The program materials and transportation were covered by a grant from the Wean Foundation and Turning Technologies.

John Waldman, 13, an eighth-grader, said he has gained more knowledge of food and how to select what foods are the healthiest, and also how to live healthy a life through exercise.

He said he liked preparing fruit quesadillas and smoothies and cleaning food, which, he said, is important.

Cayden Reed, 11, a fifth-grader, said she has learned how to cook food such as tacos with cream and applesauce, and also tuna and vegetables.

“You should never sit down when your food is cooking,” she said.

Plans are to hold a Family Night on April 10 to see what the students have completed.

bcoupland@tribtoday.com

Article source: http://www.tribtoday.com/news/community-news/2019/03/students-learn-healthy-living/

Do Eggs Really Damage Your Heart Health?

Let’s face it: the controversy around eggs and whether they damage the health of the cardiovascular system has been around for years. On one side people claim that their relatively high amount of cholesterol pushes our own cholesterol levels off the charts and that cholesterol can seriously harm one’s health. On the other side, people say that the cholesterol we eat doesn’t affect our cholesterol levels or that we shouldn’t concern ourselves with cholesterol because it is harmless. What’s a person to believe?

Sorting out the answer to that question could have widespread public health implications when you consider that the average American eats 280 eggs per year, which works out to nearly 5-1/2 eggs per week. To say that is a lot of eggs would definitely be an understatement.

New research may be just what we need to determine which side of the argument is correct. According to a new large-scale study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, which reviewed the eating habits and heart health implications of 29,615 adults, researchers found eating eggs definitely has an impact on heart health and the risk of death from heart disease.

According to the scientists, eating 3 or more eggs weekly significantly increases the risk of heart disease and early death. Eating 2 eggs daily was enough to increase the risk of heart disease by a whopping 27 percent and also increased the risk of death from any cause. Considering that forms the average breakfast for many people across North America and around the world, that’s a disturbing finding with massive potential public health consequences.

Of course, the controversy persists. And, experts on both side of the table continue to debate the study findings, particularly in light of conflicting earlier studies. But, the side of this study helps to put some of the argument behind us. It’s hard to argue with these results.

And, as for the cholesterol argument and whether it is actually bad for us: well, there’s no end to the debate there either. The reality is that your body needs cholesterol from which to make hormones, manufacture vitamin D, provide structure to cellular walls and repair damage to the blood vessels; however, it doesn’t need the high levels many people are currently facing.

High levels of cholesterol have been linked to heart disease but in more recent research have also been linked to other serious illness, including Alzheimer’s and cancer.

Excess cholesterol can clog arteries by causing them to become narrow and restricting blood flow through them, making us vulnerable to heart disease. Of course, there are many other factors involved with heart disease. Recent research published in the medical journal Nature Chemistry found that cholesterol also plays a causative role in Alzheimer’s. The scientists found that excessive cholesterol can act as a catalyst for causing beta-amyloid plaques to form in the brain—a key causal factor in Alzheimer’s disease. When beta-amyloid plaques build up they impede healthy brain functioning and even kill healthy brain cells.

Excessively high levels of cholesterol have also been linked to cancer. According to a study published in the medical journal Cell Stem Cell, researchers found that dietary cholesterol was linked to an increase in the proliferation of some intestinal cells (stem cells) that resulted in a significantly increased risk of the formation of tumors in the intestines. Their results suggest that dietary cholesterol is not the harmless stuff most of us have been recently taught to believe, and indeed, which many internet sites continue to claim. But, perhaps most shocking was the fact that animal subjects eating a high fat (and high cholesterol) diet had a whopping 100-fold increase in tumor formation.

While egg-lovers may try to hold on to their favorite breakfast foods at any cost, it seems that the jury is in on eggs and their link to heart disease.

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Dr. Michelle Schoffro Cook, PhD, DNM shares her food growing, cooking, preserving, and other food self-sufficiency adventures at FoodHouseProject.com. She is the publisher of the free e-newsletter World’s Healthiest News and an international best-selling and 20-time published book author whose works include: The Cultured Cook: Delicious Fermented Foods with Probiotics to Knock Out Inflammation, Boost Gut Health, Lose Weight Extend Your Life. Follow her work.

 

 

Article source: https://www.care2.com/greenliving/do-eggs-really-damage-your-heart-health.html

Extension agencies’ app prompts healthy living | Ledger Independent – Maysville Online


The FitBlue app is a new tool for Kentuckians that can help begin or maintain healthy habits through fitness and nutrition. This app is brought on by the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, and can be used by both the public and extension agencies.

“The Fit Blue app was developed to really start looking at holistic health and nutrition,” said University of Kentucky Family Health Extension Specialist Natalie Jones.

Originally starting as a website that would track ones nutrition and fitness, the FitBlue app now allows people to record their information on mobile devices for ease of access. Jones said the program itself came about as a way to Lowe obesity rates within the Commonwealth.

“It’s designed to teach the concept of nutrition and healthy eating,” she said.

Not only does the app track fitness and nutrition, Jones said the app also has a farmers market tracker and Kentucky food banks.

Along with use by the public, Jones also said extension agencies throughout the state will be using the app to organize activities to promote healthy living in their communities. One such example is the FitBlue Walking Challenge, which is brought on by the Lewis County Extension Agency, that will require the FitBlue app to participate in.

The app also contains Kentucky Proud recipes, which extension agents can use for food demonstrations and that the public can refer to for their own cooking.

The FitBlue app is available for download on either the Apple Store for iPhone or iPad users, or on the Google Play Store and is free of charge.

Jonathan Wright

[email protected]

Article source: https://maysville-online.com/news/165758/extension-agencies-use-new-app-to-encourage-healthy-living

HEALTHY LIVING: A Wallingford dietitian’s four tips to eating healthier – Meriden Record

WALLINGFORD — In a world full of processed to-go food and fad diets, it can be difficult to find healthy options when it comes to mealtime.

The Record-Journal recently sat down with Maryann Meade, registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator of nutrition and wellness, at her Oakdale Circle office to talk about affordable ways to eat healthier. Her practice is called Maryann Meade Associates

According to the latest National Dietary Guidelines from the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, about half of the U.S. population has a preventable diet-related illness like cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and obesity.

Check with your doctor or a dietician before starting any diet.

Organize your plate

According to Meade, a typical meal should follow the USDA’s “My Plate” model which divides food into appropriate portions.

The plate guide was introduced as a replacement for the food pyramid, previously used to group foods by what should be consumed the least and what should be consumed the most.

The plate guide, shaped like a dinner plate, measures portions by individual calorie needs, height, weight, age and physical activity level. The standard plate should be half fruits and vegetables, a quarter protein like beans or poultry and a quarter grains or starch like rice.

“The plate is an easy way for people to think about portions without measuring everything,” Meade said. “This way you’re going to get all the nutrients you need.”

Eat fruits and vegetables

Meade said many people she has advised over the years do not eat fruits and/or vegetables every day. She said she often sees people who fill half their plate with protein and devote a smaller portion to fruits and vegetables, or no fruit and vegetables at all.

Depending on the individual, one and a half to two cups of fruit is advised daily, with an additional two to three cups of vegetables.

A cup can be raw or cooked, fresh, frozen, or canned and can be whole or mashed.

Be cautious of diets

Meade said she cautions against diets like the Ketogenic diet, a popular trend currently, because they leave out or significantly limit important food groups, like carbohydrates. 

“Carbohydrates don’t have as many calories actually as some protein foods do,” she said.

Diets also do not commonly address the underlying problem and eventually people go back to their bad eating habits.

“It’s not just something we do temporarily,” Meade said of eating healthy.

Meade said one of the few diets approved by dietitians like herself is the Mediterranean diet, a food plan that is low in red meat intake, high in healthy fats and includes a lot of fruits and vegetables.

Break bad habits

Meade said the biggest obstacle to eating healthy is bad habits.

“You should be finished after dinner, you shouldn’t be eating all night,” she said of a common damaging habit. “That’s where a lot of people get into trouble and they’re not necessarily hungry they’re just bored.”

Meade said popular snacks and drinks like chips and soda shouldn’t be consumed every day.

Meal preparations should be included in weekly routines to prevent getting take-out or fast food.

More information is available by calling Meade at 203-265-9756.

akus@record-journal.com
203-317-2448
Twitter: @KusReporter

Article source: http://www.myrecordjournal.com/News/Lifestyle/Features/Healthy-Living/Tips-for-healthy-eating-from-a-registered-dietitian.html

Extension agencies use new app to encourage healthy living | Ledger Independent


The FitBlue app is a new tool for Kentuckians that can help begin or maintain healthy habits through fitness and nutrition. This app is brought on by the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, and can be used by both the public and extension agencies.

“The Fit Blue app was developed to really start looking at holistic health and nutrition,” said University of Kentucky Family Health Extension Specialist Natalie Jones.

Originally starting as a website that would track ones nutrition and fitness, the FitBlue app now allows people to record their information on mobile devices for ease of access. Jones said the program itself came about as a way to Lowe obesity rates within the Commonwealth.

“It’s designed to teach the concept of nutrition and healthy eating,” she said.

Not only does the app track fitness and nutrition, Jones said the app also has a farmers market tracker and Kentucky food banks.

Along with use by the public, Jones also said extension agencies throughout the state will be using the app to organize activities to promote healthy living in their communities. One such example is the FitBlue Walking Challenge, which is brought on by the Lewis County Extension Agency, that will require the FitBlue app to participate in.

The app also contains Kentucky Proud recipes, which extension agents can use for food demonstrations and that the public can refer to for their own cooking.

The FitBlue app is available for download on either the Apple Store for iPhone or iPad users, or on the Google Play Store and is free of charge.

Jonathan Wright

[email protected]

Article source: https://maysville-online.com/news/165758/extension-agencies-use-new-app-to-encourage-healthy-living

Healthy Living: Loneliness and depression common among aging adults


In ‘Healthy Living’ this month, Q13 is focusing on the challenges facing adults as they age.  For many people the changes that come with getting older can leave a negative impact on their emotional well-being and physical health.

Dr. Jim Polo , the Behavioral Health Medical Director for Regence stopped by the Q13 news studio to talk to Marni Hughes about this common concern, and offered advice to help people cope.

Article source: https://q13fox.com/2019/03/20/healthy-living-loneliness-and-depression-common-among-aging-adults/

Just Born Supports New St. Luke’s Healthy Living Initiative (Sponsored)

St. Luke’s got a sweet visit on Tuesday, Feb. 26, when the famous PEEPSmobile rolled up to Priscilla Payne Hurd Pavilion at St. Luke’s University Hospital-Bethlehem. It was brought there for a special occasion, as representatives from Bethlehem’s Just Born Quality Confections presented a check for $5,000 to support the Mobile Market Voucher Pilot Program, a new St. Luke’s Healthy Living Initiative developed in partnership with the Kellyn Foundation.

Just Born Healthy Living

Credit: St. Luke’s University Health Network

From left to right: Shannon Veneziano, St. Luke’s Clinical Coordinator; Samantha Bouton, St. Luke’s Community Health Intern; Dr. Kathy Paulik Ramson, RN, CCRN, St. Luke’s Network Director of Healthy Living and Chronic Disease Initiatives; Carol Saegar, Just Born Quality Confections Corporate Affairs Manager; Eric Ruth, Kellyn Foundation Co-Founder and CEO; and Carla Arbushites, St. Luke’s Assistant Vice President for Development. The check that was presented will support St. Luke’s Hospital’s Healthy Living Initiative’s  Mobile Market Voucher Pilot Program.

The grant enables St. Luke’s and the Kellyn Foundation to provide a select group of diabetic patients at the Fowler Community Wellness Center/Hispanic Center of the Lehigh Valley with access to fresh produce throughout the 2019 growing season (June through October). Patients can also participate in plant-based cooking classes to encourage clean eating habits at home, and the center’s kitchen staff will be trained on the preparation of healthy senior meals.

“Through this program, we can help remove the barriers that our patients face when evaluating their meal options,” said Dr. Kathy Paulik Ramson, RN, CCRN, St. Luke’s Network Director of Healthy Living and Chronic Disease Initiatives. “Empowering our patients to make healthier choices has a significant impact on the state of their overall well-being–both physically and mentally.”

The pilot program kicks off this summer. It will end in the fall with a celebration for participants which will also serve as an opportunity to measure patient outcomes from this period of cleaner eating.

The goal is to expand the program to a wider network of patients and move the needle on improving diet and chronic disease prevention to promote healthier living throughout the community.

Note: This local healthy living news is brought to you in partnership with St. Luke’s University Health Network.

Article source: https://sauconsource.com/2019/03/20/just-born-supports-new-st-lukes-healthy-living-initiative-sponsored/

Healthy Living: Calypso Knee

For the very first time in the United States, surgeons have implanted a new device designed to relieve knee pain in patients with arthritis.

In Healthy Living, Courtney Hunter explains how the calypso knee device is putting spring back in the steps of people whose knees have been worn down after years of use. 

Chuck is retired from the fire department, but he’s looking forward to supporting local firefighters in a non-paid rehabilitation position.

Researchers are studying the calypso knee device, developed by the company Moximed, in 80 patients before it would be available nationwide.

In European studies, the implant has provided pain relief for a decade for some patients.


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Article source: https://www.9and10news.com/2019/03/20/healthy-living-calypso-knee/

Healthy Living Market & Cafe reveals fresh renderings for new Williston store

WILLISTON – The owners of Healthy Living Market Cafe have submitted plans for a new store near Taft Corners in Williston that would open in early- to mid-2020.

The South Burlington-based company already has a branch in Saratoga Springs, and has proposals drawn up for a Shelburne store on U.S. 7.

BUSINESS GROWTH STALLED: No growth in the number of Vermont businesses

A Williston location would be attractive to nearby Williston residents as well as to shoppers from Essex, Richmond and parts of Hinesburg, said co-owner Eli Lesser-Goldsmith on Tuesday.

“There are hundreds of residences here; the infrastructure is here,” he added. “We’re excited to be joining this community.”

Groundbreaking at the site — directly across Williston Road/U.S. 2 from the Shaw’s entrance to Taft Corners — is scheduled for June or July, depending on when the permitting process is complete, Lesser-Goldsmith said. Construction would take nine to 12 months.

SURVIVING TRADER JOE’S: Healthy Living weathers the Trader Joe’s era

BAGEL BAKERY SETTLES: Burlington Bagel Bakery to move into old Bruegger’s space on Church Street Marketplace

Healthy Living plans to lease about 18,000 square feet of space in a commercial building to be built by Finney Crossing developers Snyder FC Commercial Properties LLC and Rieley Properties LCC.

The proposed Williston branch of the grocery would be about 40 percent smaller than the anchor store on Dorset Avenue, which is 30,000 square feet.

A new restaurant, unaffiliated with the grocery, as well as several retail stores would occupy the same building, according to the developers.

NEW RESTAURANTS: Farmhouse Group to open three new restaurants just outside of Burlington

ReSOURCE AT WILLISTON: ReSource store in Burlington eyes Williston location

That combined development is on the April 9 agenda for discussion by the Williston Development Review Board.

Contact Joel Banner Baird at 802-660-1843 or joelbaird@freepressmedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @VTgoingUp.

Article source: https://www.burlingtonfreepress.com/story/news/2019/03/20/healthy-living-market-and-cafe-plans-open-new-store-williston/3212510002/

Kennebec Valley YMCA to start childhood obesity program

The Kennebec Valley YMCA — Manchester Campus will offer Healthy Weight and Your Child from 6 to 8 p.m. beginning Monday, March 25, at the Kennebec Valley YMCA, 40 Granite Hill Road, Manchester. The program will be held Mondays and Wednesdays.

The pilot program is designed to empower children between the ages of 7 and 13, with the support from their families, to reach a healthy weight and live a healthier lifestyle. The last day to register is Friday.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, obesity now affects 17 percent of all children and adolescents in the U.S. Today, one in six children are obese and one in three are overweight, which poses greater risks for a number of health problems such as type 2 diabetes, hypertension, high cholesterol and mental health issues, according to a news release from the YMCA.

“The Kennebec Valley YMCA has a long history of advancing the health and well-being of children in Kennebec Valley and helping children reach a healthy weight is important now more than ever,” said Feargal Semple, Healthy Living director, according to the release. “Healthy Weight and Your Child will help children experience improved health outcomes and higher self-esteem, and families will feel empowered to make and support healthier choices.”

The 25-session program engages the whole family, so together they can understand how the home environment and other factors influence the choices that lead to a healthy weight. Additionally, the program combines three elements of healthy eating, regular physical activity and behavior change.

Made up of groups of eight to 15 children and an accompanying adult, the program creates a safe, fun and active environment for children and their families to explore and adopt proven methods to living a healthier lifestyle. Sessions are two hours in length, with the first hour delivered in a classroom setting and the second hour focusing on physical activity.

Children eligible for the program must be between the ages of 7 and 13, have a body mass index greater than or equal to the 95th percentile, receive approval from their doctor or a health care provider, and accompanied by an adult at every session.

The cost is $100 (includes membership during the program), scholarships are available. People are encouraged to apply for scholarships if needed. 

For more information, contact Feargal Semple, Healthy Living director, at 622-9622, ext. 122, or [email protected].


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Article source: https://www.centralmaine.com/2019/03/19/kennebec-valley-ymca-to-start-childhood-obesity-program/