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Free training offered to future healthy living leaders

The Trump administration is resurrecting a Reagan-era rule that would ban federally funded family planning clinics from discussing abortion with women, or sharing space with abortion providers.

Article source: http://www.tucsonnewsnow.com/story/38243496/free-training-offered-to-future-healthy-living-leaders

Healthy Living: May 22, 2018

BANGOR, Maine (WABI) - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Luxturna (voretigene neparvovec-rzyl), a new gene therapy, to treat children and adult patients with an inherited form of vision loss that may result in blindness. Luxturna is the first directly administered gene therapy approved in the U.S. that targets a disease caused by mutations in a specific gene.

Luxturna is approved for the treatment of patients with confirmed biallelic RPE65 mutation-associated retinal dystrophy that leads to vision loss and may cause complete blindness in certain patients.
Hereditary retinal dystrophies are a broad group of genetic retinal disorders that are associated with progressive visual dysfunction and are caused by mutations in any one of more than 220 different genes. Biallelic RPE65 mutation-associated retinal dystrophy affects approximately 1,000 to 2,000 patients in the U.S. Biallelic mutation carriers have a mutation (not necessarily the same mutation) in both copies of a particular gene (a paternal and a maternal mutation). The RPE65 gene provides instructions for making an enzyme (a protein that facilitates chemical reactions) that is essential for normal vision. Mutations in the RPE65 gene lead to reduced or absent levels of RPE65 activity, blocking the visual cycle and resulting in impaired vision. Individuals with biallelic RPE65 mutation-associated retinal dystrophy experience progressive deterioration of vision over time. This loss of vision, often during childhood or adolescence, ultimately progresses to complete blindness.

Luxturna works by delivering a normal copy of the RPE65 gene directly to retinal cells. These retinal cells then produce the normal protein that converts light to an electrical signal in the retina to restore patient’s vision loss. Luxturna uses a naturally occurring adeno-associated virus, which has been modified using recombinant DNA techniques, as a vehicle to deliver the normal human RPE65 gene to the retinal cells to restore vision.

Luxturna should be given only to patients who have viable retinal cells as determined by the treating physician(s). Treatment with Luxturna must be done separately in each eye on separate days, with at least six days between surgical procedures. It is administered via subretinal injection by a surgeon experienced in performing intraocular surgery. Patients should be treated with a short course of oral prednisone to limit the potential immune reaction to Luxturna.

The safety and efficacy of Luxturna were established in a clinical development program with a total of 41 patients between the ages of 4 and 44 years. All participants had confirmed biallelic RPE65 mutations. The primary evidence of efficacy of Luxturna was based on a Phase 3 study with 31 participants by measuring the change from baseline to one year in a subject’s ability to navigate an obstacle course at various light levels. The group of patients that received Luxturna demonstrated significant improvements in their ability to complete the obstacle course at low light levels as compared to the control group.
The most common adverse reactions from treatment with Luxturna included eye redness (conjunctival hyperemia), cataract, increased intraocular pressure and retinal tear.
The FDA granted this application Priority Review and Breakthrough Therapy designations. Luxturna also received Orphan Drug designation, which provides incentives to assist and encourage the development of drugs for rare diseases.
The sponsor is receiving a Rare Pediatric Disease Priority Review Voucher under a program intended to encourage development of new drugs and biologics for the prevention and treatment of rare pediatric diseases. A voucher can be redeemed by a sponsor at a later date to receive Priority Review



of a subsequent marketing application for a different product. This is the 13th rare pediatric disease priority review voucher issued by the FDA since the program began.
To further evaluate the long-term safety, the manufacturer plans to conduct a post-marketing observational study involving patients treated with Luxturna.
The FDA granted approval of Luxturna to Spark Therapeutics Inc.

Article source: http://www.wabi.tv/content/news/Healthy-Living-May-22-2018-483369261.html

SEARHC awards healthy living grant to Petersburg Indian Association

Leatha Merculieff, SEARHC’s vice president of executive administration, awards a “Healthy is Here” grant to Petersburg Indian Association tribal council president Tracy Welch. (Photo courtesy of Ross Nannauck III)

The Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium awarded a $50,000 healthy living grant to the Petersburg Indian Association Monday night. SEARHC is a regional non-profit health care provider operating in 20 communities in Southeast Alaska. It has a 15-person board of directors representing as many communities in Southeast. The organization is awarding a “Healthy is Here” grant to tribal organizations in each of the 15 communities.

Leatha Merculieff , SEARHC’s vice president of executive administration, said the money is intended for healthy activities.

“It’s up to the Petersburg Indian Association to decide what is healthy and what healthy activities means to them,” Merculieff said. “It’s not for us to decide what they’re going to do with the money. They can build a playground, they can buy vegetables for tribal members. It’s really up to them what they think is healthy.”

SEARHC started distributing checks about a month ago. Projects are not yet decided but Merculieff said they’ve heard some of the ideas for using the grants.

“In Klukwan they’re going to, (they have) the idea of expanding their library for their kids and their community,” she said. “We’ve heard ideas of purchasing a whole bunch of canned vegetables and fruit in Angoon for having a closet full of vegetables so their tribal members can come and get canned vegetables and canned fruit. It varies across. Craig had the idea of sponsoring a basketball tournament, so it just really varies.”

Ross Nannauck III is a SEARHC board member from Petersburg and he’s confident the PIA tribal council will be able to find a good use for the money in the community.

“There’s always the need for something,” Nannauck said. “Right now a lot of places are having problems with the addictions that are going on and that‘s one of the things, such as our ANB (Alaska Native Brotherhood) here in town is starting up a talking circle, healing circle to help address that and I was mentioning to them about the grant.”

The full Petersburg Indian Association tribal council hasn’t yet had a chance to meet and decided on how to spend the money.

“We have already received multiple requests and ideas, all of which will be taken under advisement as we begin the decision making process,” said tribal council president Tracy Welch in an email. “Many areas of need have been identified and we look forward to putting the funding to good use. We’d like to thank SEARHC for their generosity and commitment to bettering the lives of the citizens that they serve.

The grant could be annual depending on the bottom line for the regional health care provider. Tribal organizations have to spend the money by September 30th in order to be eligible for a grant next year.

  • Undeneath the Matanuska.
  • Rep. Mike Chenault, R- Nikiski, talks to reporters during a press availability on April 13, 2017, in the state Capitol in Juneau.
  • Google spin-off company Waymo's Firefly 1 reference vehicle. Waymo is one of seven companies that has notified Washington's Department of Licensing that they plan to test self-driving vehicles.

Article source: https://www.ktoo.org/2018/05/21/searhc-awards-healthy-living-grant-to-petersburg-indian-association/

Healthy Living House Calls: Back pain

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Dr. Cristopher Baker, a neurosurgeon and medical director of the Florida Hospital Orlando Spine Center, answered your questions about back pain. 

For more information visit FloridaHospitalHouseCalls.com.

 

 

 

 

 

Article source: http://www.fox35orlando.com/health/healthy-living-house-calls/healthy-living-house-calls-back-pain-

Healthy Living: Prenatal education


CHAMPAIGN–

Datia Rosenberg joins us to talk about natural birth. 

Article source: http://www.illinoishomepage.net/the-morning-show/healthy-living-prenatal-education/1190812095

9 Uncommon Things That Can Trigger a Migraine

by Andrea Donsky, Naturally Savvy

If you think about what triggers a migraine, what are the first few things that come to mind? Bright or flashing lights? Lack of sleep? Coffee and caffeine? Chocolate? These are common migraine triggers, but not every migraine sufferer is bothered by these factors. So if these are off the table, the question becomes, what else could it be?

For the approximately 18 percent of American women and 6 percent of American men who experience migraines, this can be an all-important question.

If you or a loved one is a migraine sufferer and you have identified the triggers, this is first great step toward dealing with this debilitating condition. However, many individuals are still looking for the one or more underlying triggers for their severe head pain.

Not every migraine sufferer is triggered by the same factors. If common triggers aren't behind your migraines, what else could it be?

It’s entirely possible one of the more uncommon factors listed below could be a trigger for your migraine. What do you think?

1. Catch-up sleep.

It’s not uncommon in this day and age to not get enough sleep, so catch up sleep can be a great way to remedy that, right? Wrong—at least for some people who suffer with migraines.

Sleeping in on weekends or other days off can actually trigger migraines in some people. Migraineurs need to maintain a steady go-to-bed and get-up routine seven days a week.

2. Electronic devices.

Many people feel they can’t live without their electronic devices—smartphones, laptops, tablets. Yet the blue light emitted from these devices, especially when you expose yourself to them around bedtime, can trigger migraines.

If there is no tearing yourself away from checking your phone or tablet at night, then at least wear digital screen protection glasses (they work well!).

3. Patterns.

Have you ever looked at a patterned sofa, dress, rug, blanket, shower curtains, or painting and felt a little dizzy? For some people who get migraines, some visual patterns such as checks, lines, squiggles, or circles can overstimulate the occipital cortex in the brain and trigger headaches.

It’s best to choose simple designs for items in your home, including your furniture, bed linens, and rugs.

4. Delayed stress response.

It makes sense that someone might experience headache pain while in the midst of a stressful situation, such as a overwhelming work environment, caring for a loved in who is ill, or looking for a job. Yet some people actually experience a migraine once the stressful situation has passed.

Such migraines are sometimes referred to as let-down or weekend migraines. They appear once the stress has passed and the individual can finally relax.

If you want to help prevent such a migraine trigger, try to practice stress-reduction measures and follow a healthy lifestyle during the stressful event. This effort can help prevent the dramatic difference in how the body is during the stress—elevated stress hormone (cortisol, adrenaline) levels, heightened sense of awareness, on edge—and after when you can finally let go and relax.

5. Sudden changes in temperature or pressure.

Not all headache and migraine experts agree that dramatic changes in temperature or barometric pressure can trigger migraines, but many do. Recognizing if either of these natural triggers are true for you can at least allow you to make plans or adjustments in your life to reduce these risk factors.

For example, traveling by airplane may trigger migraines, so alternative plans may be needed. Ear plugs and hearing aids are available that can help regulate ear pressure and prevent migraine. Also try to be prepared with appropriate clothing for big changes in temperature.

6. Certain food additives.

Some foods contain substances that have been shown to trigger migraines. Why these ingredients set off a migraine in some people and not others is not completely understood.

Two substances identified as triggers are tyramine and phenylethylamine, two amino acids found in various foods, such as aged or fermented cheeses (blue, Brie, cheddar, all hard moldy cheeses), nuts, citrus, soy foods, and vinegar.

Other food additives that may trigger migraine include aspartamemonosodium glutamate and its many names (e.g., yeast extract, hydrolyzed or autolyzed yeast, hydrolyzed vegetable protein (HVP), hydrolyzed plant protein (HPP), sodium caseinate, and kombu extract), sulfites (found in dried fruit and wines), and nitrites (found in processed meats).

Keep a headache diary to help you identify whether food or food additives are triggering your migraine. Write down everything you eat and when you experience migraine pain, then look for patterns.

7. Sleep apnea.

People with sleep apnea experience a blocked upper airway while they sleep, and they stop breathing for a period of time. Because their access to oxygen decreases, they are susceptible to developing a migraine.

If you suspect sleep apnea may be a cause of your migraines, have someone watch you sleep or look into a sleep clinic to determine if you stop breathing during the night. Sleep apnea can be treated without medication.

8. Some medications.

Among the common medications that may trigger migraine are oral birth control pills and antidepressants. The synthetic estrogen and progesterone in oral contraceptives can help balance a woman’s hormones but for some they also lead to a migraine.

In addition, some antidepressants, including SSRIs, are frequently prescribed to treat migraine, but some migraineurs are triggered by these drugs. In both cases, women should talk to their healthcare provider about making medication adjustments.

9. Sex.

Any type of vigorous or intense physical activity may trigger migraine, and that includes sex. Two types of sex headaches have been identified: pre-orgasmic and post-orgasmic.

For those who experience sex headaches, one natural solution is to let your partner do much of the physical “work” during sex. Unfortunately, most ways to deal with sex headache involved medications.

Images via Thinkstock.

Article source: https://www.care2.com/greenliving/9-uncommon-things-that-can-trigger-a-migraine.html

8 Signs that a Diet Isn’t Right For You

A diet is good for you if it helps you lose weight, right? That may seem true, it but isn’t. Losing weight is not an indicator that your diet is healthy.

A diet can ruin your health and make you miserable, even when it aids weight loss. That’s because most diets ask people to eliminate entire nutrients, like carbohydrates or fats, which results in nutritional deficiencies and all sorts of health problems.

However, not all diets are bad. Lifestyle-focused diets, like a whole food, plant-based diet not only help you lose weight but have positive impacts on your overall health.

These are some telltale signs that a diet is not right for you.

A diet is good for you if it helps you lose weight, right? That may seem true, it but isn't. Losing weight is not an indicator that your diet is healthy.

1. You have persistent diarrhea.

It is common for people to experience diarrhea after making dietary changes. Sometimes the diarrhea is temporary. In other cases, it persists for weeks.

Adding too much fiber to your diet too quickly or eating foods with artificial sweeteners are a couple of the dietary changes that can cause diarrhea.

If a diet is giving you diarrhea, it’s time to quit it. And do not hesitate to see your doctor if diarrhea persists.

2. You are tired all the time.

Fatigue is one of the main reasons people quit diets. You may feel tired all the time, if your diet is too low in calories or lacks iron and other nutrients.

Research shows that a diet low in complex carbs can cause fatigue.

If you’re new to a plant-based diet, you may experience fatigue due to iron deficiency, if you’re not including enough iron-rich plant foods in your meals. Make sure you’re getting enough iron from these plant sources.

3. You have intense, prolonged cravings.

Intense cravings may be a signs that your diet lacks vitamins and minerals.

For instance, craving chocolate could suggest magnesium deficiency, according to research. A diet that lacks one of the three macronutrients - carbohydrates, fat, and protein – can also increase your cravings.

Unless you are on a sugar detox, do not stick to a diet that gives you intense cravings for a long period of time.

4. You get sick often.

A healthy diet is supposed to strengthen your immune system, not weaken it. Yet, people stick to diets that cause constant headaches, sore throats, and digestive problems, if they’re also losing weight.

It’s important to mention here that cutting back on processed carbs or increasing fiber intake can cause minor health problems that may last for a few days. But if a diet makes you sick for weeks on end, that is a clear sign that you should quit it.

5. You feel cold all the time.

Feeling colder than usual may be a sign that your diet lacks iodine. Iodine is vital for weight loss, since it helps regulate thyroid hormones.

Iodine deficiency has many other negative side effects, so make sure you get it from these sources.

6. You are easily irritable.

We tend to blame stress or lack of sleep for our irritability, but the truth is a poor diet can also cause irritability.

According to research, a diet that lacks vitamin B6 can make you more irritable. Luckily, you can get vitamin B6 from potatoes, fortified cereals, and non-citrus fruits.

7. You are aging fast.

The effects of a poor diet do not always show up instantly. It may take a year or more to start seeing the effects.

A diet that lacks antioxidants and vitamins A, C, D, and E can cause premature aging. If you notice that your skin is getting wrinkly fast, add more fruits, veggies, and herbs to your diet.

8. Your skin is dry and itchy.

Low fat intake can make your skin dry and itchy. Research shows that fats increase the absorption of vitamins and minerals, which reduces the risk of nutritional deficiencies.

Consume enough skin-promoting vitamins like A, D, and E. Then increase the intake healthy fats such as olive oil, avocado, and nuts and seeds.

Article source: https://www.care2.com/greenliving/8-signs-that-a-diet-isnt-right-for-you.html

Hopewell elementary schools host Healthy Living Fair for students and families

Event stressed fitness and eating right.

HOPEWELL — Patrick Copeland Elementary School hosted a health event recently where students attending all of the city’s elementary schools and their families could come to learn about healthy living.

Sommer Jones, an instructional coach for Hopewell City Public Schools said, “This is the Healthy Living Fair. It’s about bringing to our kids healthy options through interactive learning. There’s so much here to explore.”

Greater Richmond Fit For Kids representative Cynthia Piazza said that she was at the Healthy Living Fair on a grant with the John Randolph Foundation. We try to integrate a culture of wellness in the schools.”

Piazza, a certified teacher, shares her academic lessons with Hopewell elementary teachers to help “get the kids up and moving.”

Her interactive portion of the Healthy Living Fair illustrated exactly (and surprisingly) how much sugar is actually present in beverages parents and children imbibe on a daily basis. Most people were shocked to discover how many grams of sugar were present in classic southern sweet tea, popular sodas and sports drinks.

“We call it the ‘Sugar Shocker Lesson,’” said Piazza, sweeping a gesture at the displayed drinks and sugar containers depicting how much was in each drink. “The McDonald’s Sweet Tea has 25 teaspoons of sugar. People are very, very surprised. When women and children are supposed to have only six teaspoons a day … It’s really shocking for people.”

“I prepared some strawberry and cucumber water for everyone to taste,” added Piazza. She pointed out a large dispenser of water with chopped-up bits of strawberries and cucumbers inside.

Nine year-old Kimmie Daniels, with no small measure of excitement, exclaimed, “It’s not very sweet, like the stuff you normally drink, but you can taste the strawberries and the cucumbers. It’s not very sweet, but it still tastes so good!”

Many other interactive engagements provided opportunities for participants to learn about different aspects of healthy living at the fair.

Representatives from Hopewell Family Dentistry provided handouts as well as information for people to chew on. Officers from the Department of the Sheriff shared safety information with participants. And, several other stations informed people about other aspects of healthy living.

Sheriff Billy Costanza said, “We’re showing the parents what the Sheriff’s Department has to offer. We have the Project Lifesaver Program, which helps children or adults with special needs in case they go missing or become lost. We help relocate them. … We’re answering questions about the Sheriff’s office, explaining what we do and what our duties are. And, we’re giving out small badges to the kids so they know we’re here to help out the community,” he said.

While this was going on in Patrick Copeland’s cafeteria, yet other aspects of living a safer and healthy life were demonstrated on the main stage by Hopewell Martial Arts World. Boards were broken by martial arts students and self-defense techniques were employed.

“I really like this,” said Cindy Bradley, a mother of two DuPont Elementary students. “It’s healthy for them, physical fitness-wise. But, I want my kids to be able to defend themselves from bullies. They’ll always be bullies, and I think teaching them martial arts will give them what they need if they ever really need to defend themselves from bullies.”

Just outside the gymnasium stage, where the martial arts demonstrations were given, stood a tall tower silhouetted against a quickly setting sun, casting a long shadow across field grass and parking lot pavement. Assisted by soldier volunteers from Fort Lee, children ascended and descended the climbing tower.

“In a way,” stated student grandparent Ernie Frost, “it’s like that Devil’s Tower from ‘Close Encounters of the Third Kind.’ I mean, it’s not a bad thing at all. It’s just a thing they have to climb. Because it’s there.”

Private Bryan Ortiz, a Fort Lee trainee of the 27-Delta course (Paralegal) set to ship out to his next assignment in a matter of days, was helping kids ascend the climbing tower. Ortiz said, “It’s fun working with kids. They give you a new perspective on things.” When asked what he gets from working with children, Ortiz smiled and answered, “A smile. A natural smile on my face. Being with new, normal people having a normal, good-old time. It’s just nice seeing the atmosphere. It’s calm. There’s nothing serious about it. There’s no worry.”

Also outside was a trailer outfitted with exercise bikes and energetic music. This attracted many students. Assisting in this aspect of fitness was P.E. teacher Ryan Ponder. “It’s a great turnout. The kids look like they’ve enjoyed the health fair tonight. My favorite part of the event is this bike trailer because I like biking myself. It’s neat, it’s a lot of fun, and the kids are super-active, and that’s what we’re looking for,” said Ponder.

Such an atmosphere of interactive and fun learning did not just spontaneously generate. It took the coordinated efforts of dedicated people. And, those people were directed by Dr. Tina Barringer, director of Elementary Instruction.

Barringer, said, “The P.E. (Physical Education) teachers did the overwhelming amount of the work. I helped coordinate it. They worked together to decide what should happen in the event, and they invited vendors, and planned out the scope of where everything should go.” She continued praising them, saying, “There are six of them, two in each of the three schools, and they’ve just done a wonderful job.

“Tonight’s event is about fitness, as well as eating right,” she continued. “We’re trying to take it from both perspectives. It’s about a lot of exercise. Just getting out there and moving. And the nutritional side as well.”

Barringer explained that the event was an effort from all three of Hopewell’s elementary schools. “Very often, in Hopewell, we’ll have an event at one elementary school,” she said. “This is a time when we’re coordinating, putting the three together. It’s pretty well attended considering it’s the first year.

“I’m really proud of the P.E. teachers. They’ve done really well,” said Barringer. She also stated that the efforts of Paula Brumfield, who wrote the grant, was instrumental in the success of the event.

In the end, Dr. Barrigner said that the success of the event was “due to a solid, good, team effort.”

All of the previous being said, what is the takeaway from the Healthy Living Fair?

“Move and eat well,” answered Barringer. “That’s the bottom line. Fitness and healthy eating.”

Article source: http://www.progress-index.com/news/20180520/hopewell-elementary-schools-host-healthy-living-fair-for-students-and-families

SEARHC awards healthy living grant to Petersburg Indian … – KFSK

Leatha Merculieff, SEARHC’s vice president of executive administration, awards a “Healthy is Here” grant to Petersburg Indian Association tribal council president Tracy Welch. (Photo courtesy of Ross Nannauck III)

The Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium awarded a $50,000 healthy living grant to the Petersburg Indian Association Monday night. SEARHC is a regional non-profit health care provider operating in 20 communities in Southeast Alaska. It has a 15-person board of directors representing as many communities in Southeast. The organization is awarding a “Healthy is Here” grant to tribal organizations in each of the 15 communities.

Leatha Merculieff , SEARHC’s vice president of executive administration, said the money is intended for healthy activities.

“It’s up to the Petersburg Indian Association to decide what is healthy and what healthy activities means to them,” Merculieff said. “It’s not for us to decide what they’re going to do with the money. They can build a playground, they can buy vegetables for tribal members. It’s really up to them what they think is healthy.”

SEARHC started distributing checks about a month ago. Projects are not yet decided but Merculieff said they’ve heard some of the ideas for using the grants.

“In Klukwan they’re going to, (they have) the idea of expanding their library for their kids and their community,” she said. “We’ve heard ideas of purchasing a whole bunch of canned vegetables and fruit in Angoon for having a closet full of vegetables so their tribal members can come and get canned vegetables and canned fruit. It varies across. Craig had the idea of sponsoring a basketball tournament, so it just really varies.”

Ross Nannauck III is a SEARHC board member from Petersburg and he’s confident the PIA tribal council will be able to find a good use for the money in the community.

“There’s always the need for something,” Nannauck said. “Right now a lot of places are having problems with the addictions that are going on and that‘s one of the things, such as our ANB (Alaska Native Brotherhood) here in town is starting up a talking circle, healing circle to help address that and I was mentioning to them about the grant.”

The full Petersburg Indian Association tribal council hasn’t yet had a chance to meet and decided on how to spend the money.

“We have already received multiple requests and ideas, all of which will be taken under advisement as we begin the decision making process,” said tribal council president Tracy Welch in an email. “Many areas of need have been identified and we look forward to putting the funding to good use. We’d like to thank SEARHC for their generosity and commitment to bettering the lives of the citizens that they serve.

The grant could be annual depending on the bottom line for the regional health care provider. Tribal organizations have to spend the money by September 30th in order to be eligible for a grant next year.

Article source: https://www.kfsk.org/2018/05/18/searhc-awards-healthy-living-grant-to-petersburg-indian-association/

Healthy Living: Fitness Tracker

Whether you are taking a brisk walk through the park or running on the treadmill, you may have a fitness tracker to count your steps.

But as Katie Boomgaard reports, that tracker has some lesser known features to help you stay on track with your health.


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Article source: http://www.9and10news.com/2018/05/16/healthy-living-fitness-tracker/