Rss Feed
Tweeter button
Facebook button
Webonews button

6 Herbs & Spices That Boost Your Brain Health

If you want to give your brain a boost, consider your spice rack. When it comes to brain health, herbs and spices are showing great promise for enhancing memory, and even protecting against serious brain disorders like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease. Here are my picks for the top brain-healing, memory-enhancing herbs and spices:

Ginger

Because brain diseases (like countless other illnesses) are linked to inflammation, it is no surprise that anti-inflammatory spices like ginger can be helpful. Research published in the medical journal Neurology found that ginger reduces the inflammation linked to brain disease and may therefore be helpful in the prevention or treatment of diseases like Parkinson’s. Additionally, research published in the journal Neurochemical Research found that ginger also prevents the reduction of the neurotransmitter dopamine involved in Parkinson’s disease.

How to use: Coarsely chop a 2-inch piece of fresh ginger and add to a pot with one quart of water. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat. Cover and allow to simmer for 45 minutes to an hour. Strain. Drink 2 to 3 cups daily.

Juniper Berries

While juniper berries are primarily known for their ability to fight urinary tract infections and give the UTI system a boost, these lovely blue berries from the coniferous bushes and trees are demonstrating their ability to slow the progression of Alzheimer’s disease. According to research, juniper berries are potent antioxidants that inhibit an enzyme linked to the brain disease, thereby showing promise in the prevention or treatment of the condition. Another study in the journal Neurochemical Research found that even regularly inhaling the essential oil could inhibit the enzyme involved in brain diseases, suggesting that the plant may also hold promise against Parkinson’s disease and dementia.

How to use: Use one teaspoon of dried juniper berries per cup of boiling water. Allow to infuse for at least 10 minutes. Strain. Drink one cup 3 times daily. Do not use for the long-term or in high doses. Avoid if you have kidney disease or while pregnant or lactating. Choose Juniperus communis.

Rosemary

This herb that doubles as an amazing holiday meal flavoring has a long-time reputation for enhancing memory. This reputation likely stems from its ability to increase blood flow to the brain. In studies, rosemary demonstrates the ability to slow the degradation of the brain messenger chemical known as acetylcholine, which is in part linked to the formation of new memories, which likely accounts for its brain-boosting and memory enhancing abilities.

How to use: Add 2 teaspoons of dried rosemary needles to a cup of water and let sit for 10 minutes. Strain. Drink 2 to 3 cups daily.

Sage

There’s a reason we’ve come to associate this herb with those who hold wisdom in their later years. The plant has a lengthy history of use to prevent and treat memory disorders and brain diseases. In research a range of beneficial effects on cognition were noted with the sage species Salvia lavandulifolia, including improvements in word recall, mood, and overall cognition. The researchers concluded that its effects are likely attributable to inhibiting the breakdown of neurotransmitter linked to brain health. Sage also improved brain-muscle coordination and the formation of new memories. Since the brain messenger, known as acetylcholine, also tends to be depleted in people who suffer from Alzheimer’s disease, sage may hold promise in the treatment of the condition.

How to use: Add one teaspoon of the dried herb to one cup of hot water and allow to steep for at least 10 minutes. Strain. Drink two to three times daily.

St. John’s Wort

When you think of St. John’s Wort, you probably think of depression, which the herb is indeed helpful for, but Swiss researchers also found that the herb has a protective effect against the beta-amyloid plaques linked with Alzheimer’s disease. While the research for this application is still in its infancy, it is exciting to think that this already-proven brain-healing herb could be a treatment for dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. Some pharmaceutical drugs interact with St. John’s wort so be sure to check with your pharmacist or doctor if you are taking medications.

Turmeric

In a study published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology researchers found that just one hour after taking a supplement containing one of turmeric’s active ingredients, curcumin, study participants had a significant improvement in memory and attention tasks compared to the placebo group.

How to use: Add the spice turmeric to your soups, smoothies, stews and curries. Or use higher concentrations in a standardized extract of curcumin. Follow package directions.

Related:

The Vitamins that Protect Your DNA against Air Pollution
Don’t Believe in Herbal Medicine? 10 Things to Change Your Mind
The 5 Best Herbs to Soothe Your Nerves

 

Dr. Michelle Schoffro Cook, PhD, DNM is the publisher of the free e-news World’s Healthiest News, president of PureFood BC, and an international best-selling and 20-time published book author whose works include: Be Your Own Herbalist: Essential Herbs for Health, Beauty Cooking.

Article source: http://www.care2.com/greenliving/6-herbs-spices-that-boost-your-brain-health.html

Healthy Living: Your Body Without Sugar

The average American consumes more than 19 teaspoons of added sugar a day, even though guidelines suggest we should be eating no more than 6-9 teaspoons daily.

You’ve probably heard that cutting your sugar intake can improve your health, but what really happens in your body when you say “sayonara” to sugar?

It’s today’s Healthy Living.

If you’re trying to cut back on sugar, remember to check the ingredient list on all the products you eat.

Sugar goes by more than 50 different names.

A simple trick to identify it is to look for ingredients that end in “ose.”

          

Article source: http://www.9and10news.com/story/35958115/healthy-living-your-body-without-sugar

Callaghan’s C-Prize finalists dominated by healthy living, rehab categories

Callaghan Innovation announced the 10 finalists in its biennial C-Prize Challenge, where innovators have been invited to create the next generation of wearable technology and the winner will receive a $100,000 prize package that includes international exposure.

Of the 10, seven were drawn from the “Living Healthier” category and include the Rehabilitation Innovation Team, which aims to help stroke sufferers, Team Rippl, which wants to change the way deaf people interact with the environment, Team Hauraki, which hopes to improve communication for people with language impairment, and Team Migo, which wants to equip young people with a system to better manage anxiety and depression, Callaghan said.

Others like Quoralis want to provide people with foresight about their fall risk, thereby reducing potential injury, Uri-Go hopes to give control back to millions of people suffering bladder issues while Team Bobux plans to empower parents through knowledge of their children’s health and shoe size.

“The convergence of technologies is allowing healthcare solutions to move from reaction to prediction,” said Southern Cross Health Society chief executive and C-Prize judge panelist Nick Astwick.

Two finalists have been drawn from the “Working Safer” category: Photonic Innovations has proposed a methane detection wearable that aims to reduce gas explosion risks while Team Sculpt wants to improve situational awareness in remote environments. In the Playing Smarter category, finalist Team UruSense aims to provide users of its wearable products with immediate answers about how well they are exercising and what they can be doing better.

The finalists, which receive $10,000 in cash and support services to develop their technology solutions to a proof of concept, were selected from 92 entrants. The grand prize winner will be announced December 1.

(BusinessDesk receives assistance from Callaghan Innovation to cover the commercialisation of innovation)

Article source: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=11894513

Health briefs 7-24-17

Events

n Exercise classes, Tuesdays and Thursdays, Center in the Woods, 130 Woodland Court, Brownsville. Classes include chair dancing at 9:30 a.m. followed by healthy steps at 11 a.m. Information: 724-938-3554.

Support groups

n Suicide Bereavement Support Group, 1 to 2:30 p.m., today, at the Anthony M. Lombardi Education Conference Center at Monongahela Valley Hospital. Information: 724-268-1144.

n Stroke Support Group, 1-2:30 p.m., Thursday, at the Anthony M. Lombardi Education Conference Center at Monongahela Valley Hospital. Information: 724-258-1455.

n Stepping Stones Bereavement Support Program, beginning 7 p.m., Sept. 11, and running for ten weeks at the Fayette County Health Center on New Salem Road. Anyone who is grieving the loss of a loved one is welcome. Information and registrations: 724-438-9373 or 724-439-1683.

n Al-Anon Family Groups, 8 p.m., Wednesdays, Trinity Church basement, Fayette and Morgantown streets, Uniontown, and 7:30 p.m., Fridays, Christian Church, Pittsburgh Street, Connellsville. These meetings are for anyone who has been affected by or is having problems from someone else’s drinking. Information: al-anon.alateen.org or pa-al-anon.org.

n Survivors of Incest Anonymous group, 6:30-8 p.m., the first and third Mondays of the month, excluding holidays. This 12-step recovery program is meant for men and women aged 18 or older who were sexually abused by a trusted person as a child. The group meets at the Mount Macrina Retreat Center. A similar group, Healing Friends, is from 6:30-7:30 p.m., East Liberty Presbyterian Church in Pittsburgh, on the second and fourth Tuesdays of the month. Information: peopleofcourage@gmail.com siawso.org, or healingfriends8@gmail.com.

n Missing Piece of My Heart Support Group, the last Thursday of each month, 6-8 p.m., at the Crime Victim’s Center conference room in the Oliver Square Plaza. The group is for families who have lost a child to a violent crime. Information: 724-438-1470.

n Silver Generation Support Program, 10 a.m. to noon Wednesdays, East End United Community Center, Uniontown. The program is for ages 55 and older. Information: 724-437-1660.

Courses

n Learn To Prevent Type-2 diabetes, today and 31 at the Anthony M. Lombardi Education Conference Center at Monongahela Valley Hospital. More information: 724-258-1483.

n American heart Association Heartsaver CPR/AED classes, 8 a.m. to noon, Tuesday, at the Anthony M. Lombardi Education Conference Center at Monongahela Valley Hospital. Information and registration: 724-258-1333.

Article source: http://www.heraldstandard.com/healthy_living/health-briefs/article_c20721b4-bb39-581e-a70e-4c99deed2378.html

Fit Family Challenge incentivizes healthy living with weekly Zumba … – San Antonio Express

Visitors to the eighth annual Family Fitness Challenge line up to redeem their rewards points early Satudray mornig at Rossevelt Park. Photo: Robin Jerstad, Freelance / San Antonio Express News / ROBERT JERSTAD

When she was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2014, Chandra Reyes had been through just about every hurdle life could throw at her — chemotherapy, aggressive surgeries, radiation therapy.

Article source: http://www.expressnews.com/news/local/article/Fit-Family-Challenge-incentivizes-healthy-living-11307902.php

Carthage Area Hospital’s Health Fair Focuses on Prevention and Healthy Living

Getting your passport to good health.

Carthage Area Hospital held its third annual health fair Saturday afternoon at the Carthage Park. It was chance for some free lunch and to get some tips on healthy living with booths for different services on hand.. the focus of much of the event is on prevention.

“This is just a step in that process,” Taylour Scanlin, director of marketing, Carthage Area Hospital said. “So if we can reach people before they’re sick and get them to doctor and get them to have their annual screenings and tests and everything, we’re taking on that responsibility and being the hospital for our community.”

To entice people to visit every booth, fair goers got a passport to be filled out at every stop – with a reward of a salad shaker or a fidget spinner for seeing them all.

Article source: http://www.wwnytv.com/story/35948181/carthage-area-hospitals-health-fair-focuses-prevention-and-healthy-living

Healthy Living: Valley Fever – Northern Michigan’s News Leader

Several crews batted a barn fire in Osceola County, and 910 News was on scene before fire crews arrived. 

Article source: http://www.9and10news.com/story/35941430/healthy-living-valley-fever

Fit Family Challenge incentivizes healthy living with weekly Zumba classes, games – San Antonio Express

Visitors to the eighth annual Family Fitness Challenge line up to redeem their rewards points early Satudray mornig at Rossevelt Park. Photo: Robin Jerstad, Freelance / San Antonio Express News / ROBERT JERSTAD

When she was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2014, Chandra Reyes had been through just about every hurdle life could throw at her — chemotherapy, aggressive surgeries, radiation therapy.

Article source: http://www.expressnews.com/news/local/article/Fit-Family-Challenge-incentivizes-healthy-living-11307902.php

Proper diet, exercise can keep pets on all fours

Veterinary assistant Jenn Leeson holds Boss, a 10-week-old puppy, while Dr. Darlene Finley examines his leg at Humane Society Calumet Area in Munster. 

Article source: http://www.nwitimes.com/niche/get-healthy/healthy-living/proper-diet-exercise-can-keep-pets-on-all-fours/article_1e436cc5-3a04-5a7b-b1ce-665db22ae5f1.html

Healthy Living: Valley Fever

Several crews batted a barn fire in Osceola County, and 910 News was on scene before fire crews arrived. 

Article source: http://www.9and10news.com/story/35941430/healthy-living-valley-fever