Rss Feed
Tweeter button
Facebook button
Webonews button

Determination, grit, and commitment

Melissa Canwell is an inspiration.  Her story is a story of determination, grit, and commitment.

Melissa always has such a positive attitude and she has inspired her entire family and those closest to her to cultivate a lifestyle of health and wellness.  She has not only transformed her life – she has transformed the lives of people around her.

She has gained the confidence to do all of the things in life that she loves doing and has also fallen in love with some new activities.  Melissa has gotten very into mud runs and obstacle course races and even organized a team from Wilcox to participate in the first Wicked Muddy Mainer this year.

It hasn’t been an easy path for Melissa – she has experienced some setbacks with injuries that she sustained while doing an obstacle course race.

This is where the story gets good – most people would use this as justification to Netflix Chill.  Not Melissa.  She was back to her training session just one week after breaking her ankle.  Our trainers were able to make modifications to stabilize her ankle so that she could still remain consistent with her training program.

Check out Melissa’s story here:

Melissa has been training with Wilcox Wellness Fitness on a consistent basis and has made incredible progress.

“I NEVER thought I could love exercise…and since first visiting Wilcox Wellness fitness, I fell in love with it!

I couldn’t even do one push-up or a plank when I first started working out now I can do a plank on 3 medicine balls,  do several push-ups  from my toes

I now have some muscle definition I have received so many compliments from my co-workers, friends, and family since training with you” – Melissa Canwell

Congratulations Melissa!  Thank you for being an inspiration to us all!

If Melissa’s story has inspired you, we would love to talk with you about how to get started with your commitment to healthy living.  Click here to schedule a time to chat with us:

http://www.wilcoxwellnessfitness.com/letschat.html

Happy Training!

Paige

QuickStart Program

If this story inspired you to commit to your own health and fitness, download our free QuickStart Program here and get started today at home: http://www.wilcoxwellnessfitness.com/quickstart.html

Join our Facebook Group

https://www.facebook.com/groups/WilcoxHealthyLiving/

Join our private Facebook Group – Healthy Living with Wilcox Wellness Fitness.  We created this Facebook group to create a community of like-minded individuals supporting each other in pursuit of their health and fitness goals. This is a place for you to ask questions, share resources, build relationships, support each other, and celebrate each other’s wins. We will be posting in here daily all things healthy living. You will learn the strategies and techniques that we have used to help our clients live their very best healthy life.

Article source: http://bangordailynews.com/link/determination-grit-and-commitment/

Health briefs 9-18-17

Events

n Multiphasic Blood Analysis, 7-10 a.m., Saturday, at the Anthony M. Lombardi Education Conference Center at Monongahela Valley Hospital. Fee is $25. Appointments must be made. Information and scheduling: 724-258-1483.

n Exercise classes, Tuesdays and Thursdays, Center in the Woods, 130 Woodland Court, Brownsville. Classes include chair dancing at 9:30 a.m. followed by healthy steps at 11 a.m. Information: 724-938-3554

Support groups

n Stroke Support Group, 6-8 p.m., Thursday, in Community Room 1 of the Main Lobby in Uniontown Hospital. Information: 724-430-5212.

n Stroke Support Group, 6-7 p.m., Sept. 26 in Conference Room A/B in Westmoreland Hospital. Information:1-877-771-1234.

n Grief Support Group, 2-3:30 p.m. at Blessed Sacrament Cathedral in Greensburg, and from 6-7:30 p.m. at Trinity Lutheran Church in Latrobe every Thursday.

n Stepping Stones Bereavement Support Program, which began 7 p.m., Sept. 11, will be running for 10 weeks at the Fayette County Health Center on New Salem Road. Anyone who is grieving the loss of a loved one is welcome. Information and registrations: 724-438-9373 or 724-439-1683.

n Grief support group with art, 6-7 p.m. Wednesdays, Latrobe Hospital. Information: 724-516-8605.

n Al-Anon Family Groups, 8 p.m. Wednesdays, Trinity Church basement, Fayette and Morgantown streets, Uniontown, and 7:30 p.m. Fridays, Christian Church, Pittsburgh Street, Connellsville. These meetings are for anyone who has been affected by or is having problems from someone else’s drinking. Information: al-anon.alateen.org or pa-al-anon.org.

n Survivors of Incest Anonymous group, 6:30-8 p.m., the first and third Mondays of the month, excluding holidays. This 12-step recovery program is meant for men and women aged 18 or older who were sexually abused by a trusted person as a child. The group meets at the Mount Macrina Retreat Center. A similar group, Healing Friends, is from 6:30-7:30 p.m., East Liberty Presbyterian Church in Pittsburgh, on the second and fourth Tuesdays of the month. Information: peopleofcourage@gmail.com siawso.org, or healingfriends8@gmail.com.

n Missing Piece of My Heart Support Group, the last Thursday of each month, 6-8 p.m., at the Crime Victim’s Center conference room in the Oliver Square Plaza. The group is for families who have lost a child to a violent crime. Information: 724-438-1470.

n Silver Generation Support Program, 10 a.m. to noon, Wednesdays, East End United Community Center, Uniontown. The program is for ages 55 and older. Information: 724-437-1660.

Courses

n American Heart Association Heartsaver CPR/AED class, 8 a.m. to noon, Tuesday, at the Anthony M. Lombardi Education Conference Center at Monongahela Valley Hospital. Information and registration: 724-258-1333.

n Better Breather’s Club: Harmonics for Health, 2-3 p.m., Tuesday, at the Anthony M. Lombardi Education Conference Center at Monongahela Valley Hospital. Information and registration: 724-258-1226.

n Living Well Series: Life After Cancer “Cancer Survivorship, Exercise and Nutrition,” 6 p.m., Tuesday, at the Anthony M. Lombardi Education Conference Center at Monongahela Valley Hospital. Sessions will include Tricia Golden, oncology nurse navigator and Krista Begonia, clinical dietician.

n Managing Your Diabetes, 6-9 p.m., Tuesday through Thursday, at the Anthony M. Lombardi Education Conference Center at Monongahela Valley Hospital. Information and registration: 724-258-1483.

n Childbirth and Labor Preparation Courses, 7-9 p.m., Wednesday, in Community Room 1 of the Main Lobby in Uniontown Hospital. Registration is required. Information: 724-430-4646.

n Breastfeeding Success, 9-11:30 a.m., Saturday, at the Memorial Conference Center at Westmoreland Hospital.

n Insulin Pump user class, 9 p.m. to noon, Sept. 26, in Conference Room 1 at Latrobe Hospital. Information: 1-877-771-1234.

n Yoga class, 5:15 p.m., Mondays, Conference Room D at the Westmoreland Hospital, and Thursdays, in Auditorium A/B/ in the Latrobe Hospital.

n Chair Fit mixed cardiovascular training, 10:30-11:30 a.m., Mondays, Conference Room D in Westmoreland Hospital.

n Interval Training class, 4:30-5:40 p.m., Mondays, at the Memorial Conference Center at Westmoreland Hospital.

n Body Sculpting and Core Conditioning, 4:30 p.m., Wednesdays, beginning Sept. 6 in the Memorial Conference Center in Westmoreland Hospital. Information: 724-830-8568.

Article source: http://www.heraldstandard.com/healthy_living/health-briefs/article_ac6b7cad-4b8f-5f56-a489-1de90a550ba8.html

Simpson Wellness Fair to promote healthy living on campus

by Maddie Travis, Staff Reporter

INDIANOLA, Iowa — Simpson College will hold a Wellness Fair on Sept. 27 to help students form valuable, healthy living habits. Staying healthy during the school year is challenging, but staying healthy as a college student is a job all on its own. Being surrounded by hundreds of people at all times who each have their own health issues makes it almost impossible to not at least catch the sniffles.

Simpson’s annual Wellness Fair aims to inform students, faculty and staff about how to live a healthy lifestyle, as well as bring awareness to the many local resources who are happy to help.

“Participants can circle around the room, have conversations about services available and grab freebies,” said Nicole Darling, assistant director of student activities and intramurals.

The Balance Life and Wellness Committee organizes the fair each year, hoping to give the Simpson community useful resources for staying healthy. Free items include five-minute chair massages and the chance to win raffle prizes with the completion of their survey.

Flu shots are also a valuable tool in staying healthy throughout the cold months of the school year and beyond.

Flu vaccination percentages remain extremely low throughout the years, according to the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases. Anywhere from 8 to 39 percent of college students receive their flu shot each year, dangerously short of the 50 percent goal from the American College Health Association and even shorter of the 70 percent from the “Healthy People 2020” target set by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“Flu shots will be available for students for $25,” Darling said.

The National Foundation for Infectious Diseases reported that approximately 5 to 20 percent of individuals get the flu each year, and more than 200,000 people are hospitalized. In addition, tens of thousands of people die from flu-related complications.

“I never got the flu in middle or high school, so I never got the flu shot,” said sophomore Courtney Kersey, who supports the flu shot initiative. “But once I came to college and experienced communal living for the first time, I got the flu and wished I would have gotten the shot prior to coming to Simpson. Free flu shots would be a huge advantage for people on campus, even if just to cut down the spread of it.”

Simpson’s Wellness Fair will be held from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Sept. 27 in the Black Box Theater. For more information, contact Darling at [email protected]

Article source: https://thesimpsonian.com/26303/news/simpson-wellness-fair-to-promote-healthy-living-on-campus/

Health calendar for the week of Sept. 17, 2017 | Health Living …

‘+

‘+__tnt.truncateStr(oAsset.title,85,’…’)+’

‘+

‘+

Article source: http://www.fredericksburg.com/features/health_living/health-calendar-for-the-week-of-sept/article_2d950d24-ebaf-5667-ae62-f7d036d4ef7b.html

In Berlin, the New Nightlife Obsession is Not Partying But Healthy Living

It was 11 a.m. on a sunny Saturday. I had been dancing at Berghain, the mega club, for five hours, and time had disappeared, as it always does in Berlin. It was mid-April, and the city was beginning to recover from its endless winter and come alive again.

I emerged from the club with a couple friends, plus two DJs we met along the way. We were starving, and the question of where to eat gained urgency. But the suggestion that followed signaled a shift in the city I knew. “Daluma?” offered my friend. “Perfect,” answered the 6-foot-tall, Berlin-born DJ who had joined our clan. Don’t get me wrong, Daluma is great— it’s known for its fresh-squeezed juices and organic vegan fare. But it’s the last place I ever imagined I would end up after a night out in Berlin.

In 2011, the members-only club Soho House had just opened, rents were rising, and warehouses where people had been squatting in the borough of Kreuzberg were being bought up by real estate developers. Complaints that “Berlin was over” and reminiscences of the “good old days” echoed in conversation. But it’s a city that’s always starting anew, forcing its denizens to reassess and adapt. Countless artists swore they would never set foot in Soho House—and now make up much of the membership.

But the biggest change in this ever-evolving landscape is a health-oriented one—not what you’d expect from a city known for its hedonism, grit, and penchant for 48-hour partying. If someone told me health would be a top-of-mind consideration half a decade ago, I would have laughed. We lived in falafel dives and burger joints. We fed off kebab carts. We had a grab-and-go lifestyle, ducking into bodegas to snatch up energy drinks, three-ounce vodka shots, and Pilsners. Health was simply the last thing on the to-do list.

X

Trou noir. Berlin, 2014.
Family affairs. Tokyo, 2014.
Lily in the U-Bahn. Berlin, 2015.
First date. Berlin-west, 2013.
Dialogue de sourds. Miami, 2015.
Full moon. Mexico, 2016.
Golden ratio. Marseille, 2015.
Heat wave.
Les absents. Berlin, 2014.
Kim. Berlin, 2016.
Lonely nights. Prades, 2016.
Mornings. St. Etienne, 2008.
Nylon gradient. Berlin, 2012.
Nylon trap. Berlin, 2017
Ritual. Condrieux, 2009.
Soft journey. Provence, 2009.
Shipwreck. Miami, 2015.
Sunbath. Prades, 2016.
Tea time. Berlin, 2017.
Twerk. Haute-Provence, 2013.
Valerie. Berlin, 2015.
Winter ghosts. Berlin-Weissensee, 2017.
Velvet loop. Berlin, 2017.

Toggle

Trou noir. Berlin, 2014.

I am floored walking through the Berlin of today, finding organic shops and eateries like Your Superfoods, Cookies Cream, Vitalia, and Bio Berlin lining every block. Not to mention the stylish workout studios that have opened, such as Spirit Yoga, Jivamukti Yoga Berlin, Lagoa (another yoga studio), or BeCycle, a yoga, pilates, and cycling studio housed in a—no surprise here—converted warehouse.

“Everyone knows Berlin to be hedonistic,” says Jordan Summers, BeCycle’s manager. “You would grab a döner kebab with friends at 7 a.m. when you were drunk and leaving a club. But that’s not always the case anymore. Health food has entered the market.” She attributes its initial entrance to the influx of expats who want to maintain the healthy lifestyles they had in their home countries, coupled with the emerging start-up communities charmed by the city’s affordable price tag. “The attractiveness of Berlin is not just
about clubbing anymore. Start up culture has really helped drive the health initiative,” Summers explains.


Two women drink juice at Daluma, a healthy hotspot in Berlin. Photo by Becca Crawford for Here Magazine.

But leave it to Berlin to put its own, contradictory stamp on the trend: for many, adopting healthier habits makes the nights last longer. “They realize drinking a green juice or smoothie after clubbing and drinking all night makes them feel better,” Summers says, noting that three of her studio instructors are also practicing DJs. “They go out at night and sweat it out the next day.”

People now prefer a 7 p.m. workout instead of a pre-dinner drink to maximize energy for the night ahead. “I’ve traveled the world for 12 years, and I’ve never found a party like Berlin,” says Daluma’s director, Lukas Bossert, who moved there from Milan. Daluma, which
is—almost too appropriately—nuzzled between an alcohol shop and a bike store, set the tone for the movement as a health pioneer when it opened two years ago. “Berlin always had a different definition of health. They thought Asian food was healthy, but it’s not,” says Bossert.


Outside Daluma in Berlin. Photo by Becca Crawford for Here Magazine.

Needless to say, he was surprised by the eatery’s immediate success serving “crazy foreign food” like kale salads and Açaí bowls. “People party, but they have a more conscious way of living now,” he says, accrediting Berlin’s slow transition to health consciousness
to its carefree lifestyle. “Health has been prevalent in New York and London for decades because life is harder there—people have to juggle two jobs to make rent—whereas in Berlin it’s easier to skate by.”

But not so much for the DJs.

“It’s a completely wrecking job. Even if they’re tired they have to play for five hours straight,” Bossert says, adding that DJs frequent his shop at all hours on the weekend until Monday afternoon when the clubs finally close. Expectedly, they gravitate toward fast-acting juice shots. Andre Crom, a big-time Berlin DJ, was quick to adapt. “If you have a lot of vegetarians around you, it makes you think about your own food and health,” he says. “Maybe they should open a smoothie bar outside of Berghain…and just add some ibuprofen in the mix.”

As we finished our salads and acai bowls at Daluma, talk of which after party to go to came to the forefront. We had been up for 24 hours—I was dying—but the others showed no signs of slowing down. And they didn’t have to. Because in the new Berlin, vodka shots
are followed by ginger shots the morning after.

For more advice on the healthiest spots in the new Berlin, visit Here.

X

The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.
The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.
The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.
The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.
The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.
The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.
The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.
The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.
The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.
The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.
The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.
The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.
The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.
The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.
The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.
The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.
The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.
The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.
The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.
The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.
The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.
The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.
The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.
The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.
The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.
The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.
The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.
The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.
The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.
The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.
The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.
The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.
The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.
The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.
The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.
The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.
The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.
The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.
The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.
The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.
The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.

Toggle

The best street style from Berlin Fashion Week.

Photo by Jeremy Moeller.

Related: Contemporary Art Is Flourishing Everywhere in Berlin

Watch: Butterflies of Paris: How Street Style Stars Do Paris Fashion Week

Article source: https://www.wmagazine.com/story/berlin-nightlife-obsession-healthy-living-daluma

Healthy Living: Nontech Treatment – 9 & 10 News

After years of animal testing, researchers at Penn State have developed a therapy to treat some of the most resistant cancers without damaging any healthy cells, and that treatment is now in the early stages of testing on humans.

In today’s Healthy Living, we talk about ceramide nanoliposome.

Researchers are now testing the dosing levels on cancer patients for whom other therapies have not worked.


Comments

comments

Article source: http://www.9and10news.com/2017/09/15/healthy-living-nontech-treatment/

Healthy Living: Busting myths about diabetes – FOX 8 News WVUE

NEW ORLEANS (WVUE) -

Type 1 diabetes is more common in children and adolescents, but there has been a recent rise in children and adolescents with Type 2 diabetes. Although the signs and symptoms are the same, they are caused by two different factors. Peggy Malone, Pediatric RN Nurse Navigator at Ochsner Hospital for Children, discusses the types of diabetes and corrects common myths about the condition.

Types of Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is caused by genetics and unknown factors that trigger the pancreas to stop producing insulin, which is an autoimmune condition. Insulin is a hormone that allows the body to get energy from food. The onset has nothing to do with diet and lifestyle.

Type 2 diabetes is caused by genetics and lifestyle factors. With Type 2 diabetes your pancreas makes insulin but it is not used properly. This condition is known as insulin resistance. Your pancreas has to make extra insulin to keep up but overtime it is unable to keep up.

Myths and Facts

Living with diabetes is very challenging, not just for the person with diabetes but for the whole family. Getting the facts from medical professionals experienced in treatment of diabetes will be beneficial in overcoming these challenges. The most common question is “how did I or my child develop diabetes?”

Parents of children with diabetes often blame themselves and some may worry that if they have diabetes, they will pass it on to their children. Unlike some traits, diabetes does not seem to be inherited in a simple pattern. The unknown causes fosters many myths as to the what, why and how’s.

Myths and Facts About Type 1 Diabetes

Myth: Type 1 diabetes is caused by eating too much sugar or being obese.

Fact: Sugar consumption or weight has nothing to do with the onset of Type 1 diabetes. Scientists believe that both genetic and environmental factors are involved, but the exact triggers are not known.

Myth: Only children can develop Type 1 diabetes.

Fact: Type 1 diabetes was formerly called “juvenile diabetes,” but you can develop it at any age. It is regularly diagnosed in teens, young adults and adults.

Myth: People with diabetes can’t or shouldn’t eat sugar or sweets.

Fact: Limiting intake of sugar and sweets can be part of a healthy diet. People with Type 1 diabetes can work sugars and sweets into their diet just like someone who does not have Type 1 diabetes.

Myth: Women with Type 1 diabetes shouldn’t get pregnant.

Fact: Women with Type 1 diabetes regularly have healthy pregnancies and deliver healthy babies with planning and support.

Myth: You can cure Type 1 diabetes with diet and exercise.

Fact: There is no cure for Type 1 diabetes at this time. Healthy eating, exercise and the proper amount of insulin will help people with Type 1 diabetes maintain better blood glucose control.

Copyright 2017 WVUE. All rights reserved.

Article source: http://www.fox8live.com/story/36377253/healthy-living-busting-myths-about-diabetes

The 5 pillars of healthy living

 

This content is provided by NITP, Inc. 

September 18, 2017 – Join our host, Bob Leins, as he welcomes Kari Utz-Wolsky, Nutrition Counselor and Personal Trainer. Kari will focus on identifying five pillars of healthy living and why so many of us are still struggling.  What are you missing?

Today’s talk will answer:

  • Could your diet be sabotaging your health goals?
  • Is there more to health than diet and exercise?
  • What should your priorities be so that you feel your best? (Or what can you personally do to improve your own health?)
  • Why don’t you feel rested when you wake?

To ask a question and have it answered during the show.  Email us in advance at ForYourBenefit@nitpinc.com or call 202-465-3080 this coming Monday.  Program begins at 10:05 ET and questions are accepted between 10:20 AM and 10:55 AM.

Article source: https://federalnewsradio.com/for-your-benefit/2017/09/the-5-pillars-of-healthy-living/

Wear your sneakers Friday to show support for healthy living – The St. Kitts

Wear your sneakers Friday to show support for healthy living

From SKNIS

In the fight to reduce the growing trends in non-communicable diseases (NCDs), the CARICOM Heads’ Summit on Chronic Diseases established Caribbean Wellness Day (CWD) in 2007. Caribbean Wellness Day is an annual event that provides opportunities to increase awareness of the NCD burden in the Caribbean; promote multi-country, multi-sectorial activities in support of wellness; and showcase national and community level activities to promote healthy living while encouraging residents to develop good health practices. 

This year, CWD was held on Sept. 9 and is followed by seven days of activities aptly titled Caribbean Wellness Week. Our focus in 2017 is on youth aged 15-29 with the theme “Securing a Future Generation through Healthy Eating and Not Smoking.”

In light of this, Friday, Sept. 15, has been designated as National Sneaker Day to promote healthy living through increased physical activity. On this day, nationals and residents island-wide are encouraged to wear sneakers with their usual corporate/work attire. The aim of this activity is to encourage persons to incorporate more physical activity into their day. 

The Ministry of Health wishes to stress the point that insufficient physical activity is one of the leading risk factors for NCDs within the federation. Regular physical activity of moderate intensity – such as walking, cycling, or doing sports – has significant benefits for health. To achieve these benefits, people should engage in physical activity up to 2½-5 hours a week or 45 minutes per day for three to five days per week. People can easily achieve the recommended activity levels by becoming more active throughout the day. Physical activity, however, should not be confused with “exercise,” which is planned, structured, repetitive and aims to improve and maintain physical fitness. 

The Ministry of Health invites all high schools, colleges, universities, government ministries, business entities, and civil society organizations to participate in the National Sneaker Day event to ensure its success. Participants are encouraged to take selfies and post on various social media platforms with the hashtag #SKBsneakerday2017.

The Ministry of Health, through this event, is seeking to provide an opportunity to increase awareness of the impact that NCDs have on the nation’s social and economic infrastructure – such as the high cost of health care, medication, disability, absenteeism from work, and reduced national productivity.  The ministry also wants to help people, in particular, youth, to become more aware of the importance of overall health and well-being, and to showcase national and community level activities that promote healthy living and encourage residents to develop good health practices.  

Article source: http://www.thestkittsnevisobserver.com/local-news/wear-your-sneakers-friday-to-show-support-for-healthy-living/

Healthy Living: Managing back to school anxiety | Q13 FOX News

Kids and parents are settling into a new school year, but remember, it may take some time to shake that back-to-school anxiety.

There is the stress of the morning routine, new teachers, friends, staying organized, studying and homework.  Let’s face it, getting back into the swing of things can be a challenging time for many families.  If that’s happening to you, please know you’re not alone.  Also, there are some very simple steps you can take to make the transition smooth for everyone.

We sat down with Megan Frye, a licensed psychologist with Seattle Children’s Hospital Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic to talk about managing back to school stress.

First off, Frye says it’s typical for kids to be worried and anxious as they go through any type of transition.  She says the key is to be consistent and get connected.

Frye suggests setting a consistent routine in the morning, afternoon and at bedtime.

Frye says one thing parents can do is create a launchpad to make getting out the door in the morning frenzy-free.  A launchpad would be a place where all the basic school items live, including a backpack, supplies and homework.  It’s also a good idea to set up a homework zone.  This is a spot where kids can concentrate, free of distractions.  Make sure it’s in a place where a parent or adult is nearby to offer help if needed.  Many experts also recommend setting a consistent bedtime.  Most school age kids need between nine and twelve hours of sleep a night.  Keeping that consistent will not only help them get up in the morning, but also keep them going throughout the school day.

When it comes to connection, Frye says kids thrive in schools where they feel connected and when their family is also involved. Frye suggests plugging in, finding opportunities to volunteer, go to back to school night, meet the teachers and staff and get to know the administrators and school.  Find out the best way to communicate with your child’s teachers.  Is it through email, over the phone or in person?  Also, Frye recommends working with your child to identify two adults that can be their support system in school.  That can be anybody from an instructional assistant, a coach or a teacher.  Basically a person they can go to if they’re in need.  Make sure those people also know you and your child have selected them as a support person.

Finally, if you’re the parent of a younger child just starting school for the first time.  If a child is having a hard time with separation anxiety, you could give them an object that can help them feel connected to you throughout their day.  It can be a small item from home they could keep in their pocket, a picture, or maybe a necklace.  Basically something that they can turn to when you’re not there and feel comforted.  Also, reassure your child that you’re going to see them after school.  Kids pick up on parents and family anxiety, so model a positive excitement and let kids know they’re going to be successful, and that you have git hopes for them in the year ahead.

 

Article source: http://q13fox.com/2017/09/13/healthy-living-managing-back-to-school-anxiety/