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Revealed: What your urine colour says about your health, according to a GP

  • Urine colour indicates hydration levels and should be a pale, straw-yellow hue
  • Darker reds and even shades of green suggest a more serious health concern
  • People should drink 1.5-2 litres of water a day and avoid dehydrating beverages
  • Urine can change colour due to certain foods, such as beetroot or asparagus
  • Darker shades may also occur due to complications of certain medications 

Alexandra Thompson Health Reporter For Mailonline

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A GP has revealed what people’s urine colour says about their health.

According to London-based Dr Luke Powles from Bupa Health Clinics, urine colour indicates people’s hydration levels, with dark yellow colours suggesting the need for an instant glass of water. 

Reds and even green shades may be a sign of a more serious health problem, he adds.

Dr Powles stresses most people require between 1.5 and two litres of water a day, and should avoid dehydrating, sugary drinks like soda and alcohol.

Below, Dr Powles outlines what different urine colours say about people’s wellbeing.

A GP has revealed what people's urine colour says about their health (stock)

A GP has revealed what people’s urine colour says about their health (stock)

Colourless urine suggests someone is drinking too much water. A pale-straw hue is ideal for optimal hydration. Darker yellows suggest the need to drink water as soon as possible. Red shades may be a sign of blood, while green urine may be due to certain medications

Colourless urine suggests someone is drinking too much water. A pale-straw hue is ideal for optimal hydration. Darker yellows suggest the need to drink water as soon as possible. Red shades may be a sign of blood, while green urine may be due to certain medications

WHAT IS FLUORESCENT URINE A SIGN OF?

A man’s urine turned fluorescent after being poisoned with antifreeze, a case report suggested in June 2017.

The unnamed man, 48, believed to be from Texas, is thought to have accidentally ingested a coolant that caused his urine to glow blue-green.

After appearing at hospital vomiting and complaining of abdominal pain, tests revealed his blood pressure was dangerously low.

He was later diagnosed with poisoning via ethylene glycol – the active ingredient in active freeze that contains fluorescent compounds.

After spending four days in hospital, he made a full recovery.

The authors wrote in BMJ Case Report: ‘A man with diabetes mellitus and alcohol abuse presented to the emergency room with altered mental status, vomiting and abdominal pain. On examination, he was confused and uncooperative’.

Test results suggested he had an abnormally low blood pressure and was breathing excessively fast.

Urine samples and mouth examinations confirmed he was suffering from ethylene glycol poisoning – a sign of antifreeze ingestion. 

Ethylene glycol poisoning typically causes the body to produce excessive amounts of acid or slows the rate the kidneys remove acid.

Pale straw 

This is the ideal urine colour and demonstrates a person is sufficiently hydrated, Cosmopolitan reported.

A lighter colour than this indicates the individual is probably drinking more water than they need to. 

Although usually harmless, this may cause them to urinate overly frequently.

Dark yellow 

Amber-coloured urine suggests somebody is dehyrated and should drink water as soon as possible.

Green

Although it may be alarming, green urine is usually harmless and occurs as a result of eating particular foods, such as asaparagus or artifical colourings.

In rare cases, however, green urine is a sign of the rare genetic disease familial hypercalcemia, which causes abnormally high calcium levels in the blood.

Green urine can also occur as a side effect of certain medications.

Red

Red urine is also usually due to eating certain foods, such as beetroot.

Yet, it can also be due to blood, such as during menstruation or, in more serious cases, infections or even cancers. 

If people are unable to link their red urine to a food they have eaten recently, they should visit their GP as soon as possible.  

 


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Article source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-5491093/What-urine-colour-says-health-according-GP.html

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